Class 9 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions and Answers Peasants and Farmers

Class 9 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions and Answers Peasants and Farmers

Check the below NCERT MCQ Questions for Class 9 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions and Answers Peasants and Farmers with Answers Pdf free download. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-9-social-science/

Peasants and Farmers Class 9 Extra Questions History Chapter 6

Class 11 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions And Answers Question 1.
When were the laws of cricket first written?
Answer:
In 1744.

Class 9 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions Question 2.
When was the world’s first cricket club formed and where?
Answer:
At Hambledon, and in 1760s.

Class 9 History Chapter 6 MCQ With Answers Question 3.
When was the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) founded?
Answer:
1787.

History Class 9 Chapter 6 Question Answer Question 4.
Where was cricket originally played?
Answer:
Cricket was originally played on country commons. As such it has been a village sport.

Class 9th History Chapter 6 Question Answer Question 5.
What led to the introduction of protective equipment in cricket?
Answer:
The invention of vulcanised rubber led to the introduction of pads in 1848 and gloves afterwards.

Class 9 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions and Answers Peasants and Farmers

Peasants And Farmers Class 9 Extra Questions And Answers Question 6.
Who was Len Hutton?
Answer:
A professional batsman who led the English team in 1930s.

Peasants And Farmers Class 9 Questions And Answers Question 7.
Name the founder of the modern public school system.
Answer:
Thomas Arnold, the headmaster of the famous Rugby School.

Ncert History Class 9 Chapter 6 Question Answer Question 8.
Which game was considered the game for the girls during late 19th century?
Answer:
Croquet, and not cricket. It was a slow-paced elegant game, suitable for women.

Class 9 History Chapter 6 Questions And Answers Question 9.
Where is cricket usually played?
Answer:
Cricket is played in Commonwealth countries.

Class 9 History Chapter 6 Question Answer Question 10.
Which and When was the first cricket club established in India?
Answer:
The Calcutta Cricket Club, in 1792.

Class 9 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions and Answers Peasants and Farmers

Class 8 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions And Answers Question 11.
Mention the place where the origins of the Indian Cricket are found in India?
Answer:
Bombay. (Now Mumbai).

Class 6 History Chapter 9 Extra Questions Question 12.
Name the first Indian community which started playing the game of cricket in the country.
Answer:
Parsis, the small community called the Zoroastrians.

Class 6 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions And Answers Question 13.
Who was India’s captain when she played against England in 1932?
Answer:
C. K. Nayudu.

Class 9 Chapter 6 Extra Questions Question 14.
When was the Imperial Cricket Conference renamed to International Cricket Conference and why?
Answer:
In 1965, to scrap the colonial influence.

Question 15.
Who saw in cricket the money-making potential?
Answer:
Kerry Packer, an Australian television 1 tycoon.

Question 16.
When was the first one-day international played and between whom?
Answer:
In 1971 between England and Australia.

Question 17.
When was the first leg before wicket (LBW) published?
Answer:
In 1799.

Class 9 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions and Answers Peasants and Farmers

Question 18.
State two grounds on which Gandhjji was averse to cricket.
Answer:

  1. It was a game for the privileged.
  2. It showed the colonial mindset.

Question 19.
Mention any four laws of cricket as were written down in 1744.
Answer:

  1. Two umpires to decide all disputes when the game was played.
  2. The stamps were to be 22 inches high.
  3. The ball was to be between 5 and. 6 ounces.
  4. Two stumps were to be, 22 yards apart.

Question 20.
Why was ball allowed to pitch through the air rather titan rolling it along the ground in the 18th century Britain.
Answer:
During the 1760s and 1770s it became common to pitch the ball through the air, rather than roll; it along the ground. This change, gave bowlers the options of length, deception through the air, plus increased pace. It also opened new possibilities for spin and swing. It also helped the batsman to master timing and sort selection. It was at his time that the curved bat came to be replaced by straight one.

Question 21.
Describe the changes in cricket rule which occurred during the 10th century.
Answer:
The 19th-century saw important changes in the cricket history.
These changes include:

  • the fule about wide balls;
  • The exact circumference of the ball was specified;
  • protective equipment like pads and gloves were introduced;
  • boundaries came to be known where previously, all shots had to be run;
  • overarm bowling became legal.

Class 9 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions and Answers Peasants and Farmers

Question 22.
How do you explain that cricket remained a colonial game?
Answer:
While some English team games like hockey and football became international games, played all over the world, cricket remained a colonial game, limited to countries that had once been part of the British empire. The pre-industrial oddness of cricket made it a hard game to export. It took roots only in countries that the British conquered and ruled.

In these colonies, cricket was. established as a popular sport either by white settlers (as in Soth Africa, Zimbabwe, Australia, New Zealand, the West Indies and Kenya) or by local elites who wanted to copy the habits of their colonial masters as in India.

Question 23.
Explain the fact that the origins of the Indian cricket are to be found in Bombay (Mumbai).
Answer:
The origins of Indian cricket, that is cricket played by Indians are to be found in Bombay and the first Indian community to start playing the game was the small community of Zoroastrians, the Parsis. Brought into close contact with the British because of their interest in trade and the first Indian community to westernize, the Parsis founded the first Indian cricket club, the Oriental Cricket Club in Bombay in 1848. Parsi clubs were founded and sponsored by Parsi businessmen like the Tatas and the Wadias.

Question 24.
Why did Mahatma Gandhi condemn Pentangular as a communally divisive competition?
Answer:
Mahatma Gandhi condemned the quadrangular or the pentangular tournament a communally divisive competition because cricket had been organised in India on communal and racial lines. The teams that played colonial India’s greatest and most famous first-class cricket tournament did not represent regions, as teams in today’s Ranjit Trophy currently do, but religious communities.

Tournament was initially called the Quadrangular because it was played by four teams: the Europeans, the Parsis, the Hindus and the Muslims. It later became the Pentangular when a fifth team was added, namely, the Rest, which comprised all the communities leftover such as the Indian Christians. For example, Vijay Hazare, a Christian, played for the Rest.

Question 25.
State briefly Gandhiji’s views on the colonial port such as cricket and football.
Answer:
Mahatma Gandhiji believed that sport was essential for creating a balance between body and the mind. However, he often emphasized that games like cricket and hockey were imported into India by the British and were replacing traditional games. Such games as cricket, hockey, football and tennis were for the privileged, he believed. They showed a colonial mindset and were a less effective education than the simple exercise of those worked on the land.

Question 26.
How has television coverage changed’ cricket? Explain.
Answer:
Television coverage changed cricket. It expanded the audience for the game by beaming cricket into small towns and villages. It also broadened cricket social base. Children who had never previously had the chance to watch international cricket because they lived outside the big cities, where top-level cricket was played, could now watch and learn by imitating their heroes.

Class 9 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions and Answers Peasants and Farmers

Question 27.
Who was Kerry Packer? What were his innovations in cricket?
Answer:
Kerry Packer, an Australian television tycoon who saw the money-making potential of cricket as a televised sport, signed up fifty- one of the world’s leading cricketers against the wishes of the national cricket boards and for about two years staged unofficial ‘Tests’ and One-day internationals under the name of World Series Cricket. The innovations he introduced during its time to make cricket more attractive to television audiences endured and changed the nature of the game.

Question 28.
Why is 1970s decade significant in the history of cricket?
Answer:
The decade 1970s has been significant in the history of cricket because of the following reasons:

  • The year 1970 was notable for the exclusion of South Africa from international cricket.
  • The year 1971 was remarkable because the first one-day international cricket was played between England and Australia in Melbourne. ,
  • The year 1977 celebrated the 100 years of test matches in cricket.

Question 29.
Write a brief essay on Cricket in the Victorian England.
Answer:
The organisation of cricket in England’reflected the nature of English society; The rich who could afford to play it for pleasure were called amateurs and the poor who played, it for a living were called professionals. The rich were amateurs for two reasons. One, they considered sport a kind of leisure.

To play for the pleasure of playing and not for money was an aristocratic value. Two, there was not enough money in the game for the rich to be interested. The wages’ of professionals were paid by patronage or subscription or gate money. The game was seasonal and did not offer employment the year-round. Most professionals worked as miners or in other, forms of working-class employment in winter, the off-seasons.

The social superiority of amateurs was built into the custom: of cricket. Amateurs were called Gentlemen while professionals had to be content with being described as Players. They even entered the ground from different entrances. The social superiority of the amateur was also the reason that the captain of a cricket team was traditionally a. batsman; not because batsmen were naturally better captains but because they were generally the Gentlemen.

Question 30.
Why did cricket become popular in the Caribbean countries?
Answer:
Despite the exclusiveness of the white cricket elite in the West Indies/the game became hugely popular in the Caribbean. Success at cricket became a measure of racial equality and political progress. At the time of their independence, many of the. political leaders of Caribbean countries like Forbes Burnham and Eric Williams saw in the game a chance for self-respect and international standing.

When the West Indies won its first Test series against England in 1950, it was celebrated as a national achievement, as a way of demonstrating that West Indians were the equals of white Englishmen. There were two ironies to this great victory. One, the West Indian team that won was captained by a white player. The first time a black player led the West Indies Test team was in 1960 when Frank Worrell was named captain. And two, the West Indies cricket team represented not one nation but several dominions that later became independent countries.

Class 9 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions and Answers Peasants and Farmers

Objective Type Questions

1. Fill in the blanks with words given in the bracket:

(i) Palwankar Baloo and Vithal were……………………. . (brothers, cousins)
Answer:
brothers

(ii) The Oriental Cricket Club was ……………………. .(Bombay, New Delhi)
Answer:
Bombay

(iii) The ……………………. were the first to start cricket in India. (Hindus, Parsis)
Answer:
Parsis

Class 9 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions and Answers Peasants and Farmers

(iv) Vijay Hazare was an Indian ……………………. . (European, Christan)
Answer:
Christian.

2. Mark right (✓) or wrong (✗) in the following:

(i) The cricket was first played in rural America.
Answer:
(✗)

(ii) The Laws of Cricket were written in1844.
Answer:
(✗)

(iii) MCC stands for Melbourne Cricket Club.
Answer:
(✗)

Class 9 History Chapter 6 Extra Questions and Answers Peasants and Farmers

(iv) Vijay Hazare was an Indian Christian.
Answer:
(✓)

3. Choose the correct answer from among the four alternatives given below:

(i) The two sets of stumps are apart:
(a) 20 yards
(b) 21 yards
(c) 22 yards
(d) 23 yards.
Answer:
(c) 22 yards

(ii) The world’s first cricket club was formed in:
(a) London
(b) Hambledon
(c) Washington
(d) Melbourne.
Answer:
(b) Hambledon

(iii) Dennis Lillee, the cricket player, belongs to:
(a) England
(b) New Zealand
(c) Australia
(d) South Africa
Answer:
(c) Australia

(iv) C. K. Nayudu was India’s Test Captain in:
(a) 1930
(b) 1931
(c) 1932
(d) 1933
Answer:
(c) 1932.

Extra Questions for Class 9 Social Science

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions and Answers Food Security in India

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions and Answers Food Security in India

Check the below NCERT MCQ Questions for Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions and Answers Food Security in India with Answers Pdf free download. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-9-social-science/

Food Security in India Class 9 Extra Questions Economics Chapter 4

Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Extra Questions And Answers Question 1.
What is food security?
Answer:
Food is as essential for living as air is for breathing. Food security means something more than getting two square meals.

Food Security In India Class 9 Extra Questions Question 2.
Why food security is necessary?
Answer:
The poorest, section of the society might be food insecure most of the times while persons above the poverty line might also be food insecure when the country faces a natural disaster like earthquake, drought, flood, tsunami, widespread failure of crops causing famine, etc.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Extra Questions Answers Question 3.
How is food security affected during a calamity?
Answer:
Due to a natural calamity, total production of food grains decreases. It creates a shortage of food in the affected areas.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Questions And Answers Question 4.
Who are food-insecure?
Answer:
Although a large section of people suffers from food and nutrition insecurity in India, the worst affected groups are landless people with little or no land depend upon, traditional artisans, providers of traditional services, petty, self-employed workers and destitute including beggars.

In the urban areas, the food-insecure families are those whose working members are generally employed in ill-paid occupations and casual labour markets.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Extra Questions and Answers Food Security in India

Extra Questions For Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Question 5.
What is Buffer stock?
Answer:
Buffer stock is the stock of food grains, namely wheat and rice procured by the government through Food Corporation of India.

Food Security In India Extra Questions Question 6.
What is minimum support price?
Answer:
The FCI purchases wheat and rice. from the farmers in states where there is surplus production. The farmers are paid a pre-announced price for their crops. This price is called minimum support price.

Economics Chapter 4 Class 9 Question Answers Question 7.
Why buffer stock is created by the government?
Answer:
Buffer stock is created by the government to distribute food-grains in the deficit areas and among the poorer strata of society at a price lower than the market price also known as issue price This also helps resolve the problems of shortage of food during adverse weather conditions or during the periods of calamity.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 MCQ With Answers Question 8.
Give the factors responsible for rising maintenance cost of food grains.
Answer:
The rising minimum support prices have raised the maintenance cost of procuring food grains by the government. Rising transportation and storage costs of the FCI ‘ are other contributing factors in this increase.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Question Answers Question 9.
Write a short note on National Food for Work Programme.
Answer:
National Food for Work Programme was launched on November 14, 2004, in 150 most backward districts of the country with the objective of intensifying the generation of supplementary wage employment and desire to do manual unskilled work. It is implemented as a 100 per cent centrally sponsored scheme and the food grains are provided to states free of cost.

The collector is the nodal officer at the district level and has the overall responsibility of planning implementation, coordination, monitoring and supervision. For 2004-05, Rs. 2020 Crore have been allocated for the programme in addition to 20 lakh tonnes of food-grains.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Extra Questions and Answers Food Security in India

Food Security In India Class 9 Extra Question Answer Question 10.
Write a short note on Antyodaya Anna Yojana (AAY).
Answer:
AntyodayaAnna Yojana was launched in December 2000. Under the scheme, one crore of the poorest among the BPL families covered under the targeted public distribution system were identified by the respective state rural development departments through a below poverty line (BPL) survey. Twenty-five kilograms of food-grains were made available to each eligible family at a highly subsidised rate of Rs. 2 per kilogram for wheat and Rs. 3 per kilogram for rice.

This quantity has been enhanced from 25 to 50 kilograms with effect from April 2002. The scheme has been further expanded twice by additional 50 lakhs BPL families in June 2003 and in August 2004. With this increase, 2 crore families have been covered under the AAY.

Class 9 Economics Ch 4 Extra Questions Question 11.
Give any four drawbacks of public distribution system?
Answer:
The four drawbacks of PDS are as follows:

  • Deaths due to hunger- Many instances of death due to hunger are prevalent despite overflowing granaries. FCI godowns are overflowing with grains with some rotting. away and some being eaten by rats.
  • High carrying costs- The high level of buffer stocks are responsible for high carrying costs. The rising minimum support price has raised the maintenance cost of procuring food grains by the government.

Food Security In India Class 9 Questions And Answers Question 12.
Hunger indicates food insecurity. Explain?
Answer:
Hunger is not just an expression of poverty, it brings about poverty. The attainment of food security, therefore, involves eliminating current hunger and reducing the risks of future hunger. Hunger has chronic and seasonal dimensions. Chronic hunger is a consequence of diets persistently inadequate in terms of quantity and/or quality. Poor people suffer from chronic hunger because of their tew income and in turn instability to buy food even for survival.

Seasonal hunger is related to cycles of food growing and harvesting. This is prevalent in rural areas because of the seasonal nature of agricultural activities and in urban areas because of the casual labour e.g. there is less work for causal construction labour during the rainy season.

This type of hunger exists when a person is unable to get work for the entire year. The percentage of seasonal, as well as chronic hunger, has declined in India. Seasonal hunger has declined to 0.6 in urban areas and 2.6 in rural areas. Chronic hunger is 0.3 in urban areas and 2.7 in rural areas.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 4 Extra Questions and Answers Food Security in India

Chapter 4 Economics Class 9 Question 13.
Critically examine public distribution system.
Answer:
Supply of essential commodities to the people by the government through ration shops is called public distribution system. PDS is the most important step taken by the government of India towards ensuring food security. It is the most important instrument, of government policy over the years for stabilizing prices and making food available to consumers affordable prices.

It has been successful in avoiding widespread hunger and famine by supplying food from surplus regions of the country to the deficit ones. In addition, the prices have been under revision in favour of poor households in general. The system including the minimum support price and procurement has contributed to an increase in food-grain production and provided income security to farmers in certain regions.

In the beginning, the coverage of PDS was universal with no discrimination between the poor and non-poor. Over the years the policy has been revised to make it more efficient and targeted. In 1992Revamped Public, Distribution was started in 1700 blocks in the country. Its target was to provide the benefits of PDS to remote and backward areas. Then in June 1997, Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS) was introduced to adopt the principle of targeting the poor in all areas.

For the first time, differential price polity was adopted for poor and non-poor. Further in 2000, two special schemes were launched, viz. Antyodaya Anna Yojana and Annapurna Scheme with special target groups of the poorest of the poor and indigent senior citizens. The functioning of the above schemes was linked with the existing network of the PDS.

Criticism-However; the Public Distribution System has faced severe criticism, on several grounds. Substances of hunger are prevalent despite over-flowing granaries. FCI godowns are overflowing with grains with some rafting away and some being eaten by rats. The storage of massive food stocks has been responsible for high carrying costs, in addition to wastage an,d deterioration in grain quality.

The average consumption of PDS grain at all Indian levels is only 1 kg. per person per month. This is much lower than the consumption pattern which is 3-4 kgs per month. As a result, the poor have to depend on markets rather than the ration shops for their food needs. PDS dealers are sometimes found resorting to malpractices like diverting the grains to open market to get better margin by selling poor quality grains.

Extra Questions for Class 9 Social Science

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions and Answers The Story of Village Palampur

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions and Answers The Story of Village Palampur

Check the below NCERT MCQ Questions for Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions and Answers The Story of Village Palampur with Answers Pdf free download. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-9-social-science/

The Story of Village Palampur Class 9 Extra Questions Economics Chapter 1

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions And Answers Question 1.
What are the different types of production activities in the village?
Answer:
There are two types of production activities in the village-

  1. farming and,
  2. non-farm activities. The non-farm activities include small manufacturing, transport and shop-keeping.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions Question 2.
Define factors of production.
Answer:
The various inputs required to produce goods and services are called as factors of production. There are mainly four factors of production: land, labour,’ physical capital and human capital.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Short Question Answers Question 3.
Distinguish between fixed capital and working capital.
Answer:
The physical capital which can be used in production over many years is called as fixed capital. For example: tools, machines and buildings. On the other hand, the physical capital which gets completely used up during the production process is called as working capital. For example: raw materials and money in hand.

Economics Class 9 Chapter 1 Extra Questions Question 4.
What is human capital?
Answer:
The knowledge and enterprise required to put together land, labour and physical capital to produce an output either for self-consumption or for sale in the market is called as human capital.

Ncert Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Important Questions Question 5.
Define multiple cropping.
Answer:
To grow more than one crop on a piece of land during the year is known as multiple cropping. It is the most common way of increasing production on a given piece of land.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions and Answers The Story of Village Palampur

Ncert Solutions For Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions Question 6.
Mention tire two ways of increasing production from the same land.
Answer:
The two ways of increasing production from the same land are:

  1. Multiple cropping and
  2. Using modern farming methods.

Extra Questions For Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Question 7.
What is the working capital required by the farmer using modern farming methods?
Answer:
The working capital required by the farmer using modem farming methods is HYV seeds, chemical fertilizers and pesticides.

Class 9 Economics Ch 1 Extra Questions Question 8.
What is surplus?
Answer:
The produce left over after self-consumption is called as surplus. This surplus is brought Over to the market for sale.

Economics Chapter 1 Class 9 Extra Questions Question 9.
Briefly explain the four factors of production.
Answer:
Every production is organized by combining land, labour, physical capital and human capital which are known as factors of production.

These factors are explained below:

  • Land-If is the first requirement for production of goods and services. The land required for farm activities is practically fixed.
  • Labour- The second requirement is labour i.e. people who will do the work. Some activities require highly educated workers like banking and some require workers, for manual work, for example, carpenter.
  • Physical capital-Physical capital es the variety of inputs required at every stage dur¬ing production. For example: tools, building, raw materials etc. Physical capital is of two types: fixed capital and working capital.
  • Human capital-The knowledge and enterprise required to put together land, labour and physical capital for producing an output either for self-consumption or to sell in the market is called, as human cap.

The Story Of Village Palampur Class 9 Extra Questions Question 10.
What is the main constraint on land?
Answer:
In villages, farming is the main production activity. Most of the people are dependent on fanning for their livelihood. The well being of these people is closely related to production in the farms. The farm production depends upon the land area under cultivation. But there is one constraint on it.

Land area under cultivation is practically fixed. There has been no expansion in land area under cultivation since 1960. By then, some of the wastelands in the village had been converted to cultivable land. There exists no further scope to increase farm production by bringing new land under cultivation.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions and Answers The Story of Village Palampur

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Worksheet With Answers Question 11.
What is multiple cropping? Explain by giving an example.
Answer:
To grow more than one crop on a piece of land during the year is known as multiple cropping. It is the most common way of increasing production. During different seasons different crops are grown on the same piece of land.

The farmers are able to grow

  • Land-It is the first requirement and natural resource. Land is a scarce resource in case of farm activities. Therefore, it must be properly utilised.
  • Labour-The second requirement is labour. By labour we mean people who will » do the work. Some production activities require highly skilled and educated workers to perform tire necessary task. Other activities require workers who can do manual work. Each worker is providing the labour necessary for production.
  • Physical capital-It is the third requirement. Physical capital means the variety of inputs required at every stage during production.

The items that come under physical capital are:

  1. Tools, machines and buildings- Tools, machines and buildings can be used in production over many years, and are called as fixed capital.
  2. Raw materials and money in hand- Production requires a variety of raw materials such as the yarn used by weaver and the clay used by the potter. Also, some money is always required during production to make some payments and buy other necessary items. Raw materials and money in hand are called working capital.

Human capital-The fourth requirement of production is human capital. The knowledge and enterprise required to put together land, labour and physical capital to produce an output either for self-consumption or for sale in the market is called as human capital.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions Very Short Question 14.
Write a short note on green revolution.
Answer:
The green revolution started in India in the late 1960’s It introduced the Indian farmer to cultivation of wheat and rice using high yielding varieties of seeds (HYV). These seeds give much greater amounts of grain on a Single plant as compared to traditional seeds.

As a result the same piece of land would now produce for larger quantities of foodgrains ‘than was possible earlier. HYV seeds, however, needed plenty of water, chemical fertilizers and pesticides to produce best results.

Higher yields were possible only from a combination. of HYV seeds, irrigation, chemical fertilisers, pesticides etc. Farmers of Punjab, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh were the first to try out the modem farming method in India. The farmers in these regions set up tube wells for irrigation and made use of HYV seeds, chemical fertilisers and pesticides. Some of them also bought farm machineries like tractors and threshers. They were rewarded with high yields of wheat.

But green revolution did not come without negative effects. Scientific reports indicated that modern farming methods have overused the natural resource base. In many areas there was loss of soil fertility due to increased use of chemical fertilizers. The continuous use of groundwater for tubewell irrigation has reduced the wafer table below the ground. This is a huge loss. Therefore, one must take care of the environment to ensure future development of agriculture.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions and Answers The Story of Village Palampur

The Story Of Village Palampur Extra Questions Question 15.
How do fanners arrange for the capital needed in fanning?
Answer:
Modem farming methods require a great deal of capital, therefore farmers now need more money than before. Different farmers have different source of capital. Most of the small farmers borrow money from large farmers or the village money-lenders or the traders who supply various inputs for cultivation. The rate of interest on such loans is very high. They are put to great distress to repay the loan. Sometimes the small farmers have to work on the fields of medium and large farmers at very low wages to repay the loan. .

In contrast to small farmers, the medium and large farmers have their own savings from farming. These farmers sell their surplus produce in market and get good, earnings. A part of these earnings are saved and kept for buying capital for the next season. Thus, they are able to arrange for the capital for farming from their own savings.

The Story Of Village Palampur Important Questions Question 16.
What is the condition of non-farm sector in villages? How can these activities Be increased?
Answer:
The non-farm activities include small manufacturing, transport shop-keeping etc. At present, the non-farm sector in the village is not very large. Out of every 100 workers in the rural areas in, India, only 24 are engaged in non-farm activities. Though there is a Variety of non-farm activities in the village, the number of people employed in each is quite small.

Unlike farming, non-farm activities require little land. People with some amount of capital can set up non-farm activities. The capital required can be mobilised either from one’s own savings or by taking a loan. It is important that loan be available at low rate of interest so that even people without savings can start some non-farm activities.

Another thing which is essential for non-farm activities is to have market where the goods and services can be sold. As more villages get connected to towns and cities through good roads, transport and telephone, it is possible that the opportunities for non-farm activities production in the village would increase in the coming years.

Class 9 Economics Chapter 1 Extra Questions and Answers The Story of Village Palampur

Ch 1 Economics Class 9 Extra Questions Question 17.
How are three factors of production land, labour and capital used in farming?
Answer:
Among these factors of production, labour is the most abundant factor of production. There are many people who are willing to work as farm labourers in the villages whereas the opportunities of work are limited. They belong to either landless families or small farmers They are paid low wages and lead a difficult life.

In contrast to labour, land is a scarce factor of production. Land has been used to its maximum. There can be no expansion in cultivated land area. Moreover, even the existing land is distributed unequally among the people engaged in farming. There are large number of small farmers who cultivate small plots of land and live in conditions not much better than the landless farm labourers. To make the maximum use of the land farmers use multiple cropping and modem methods of farming both these have led to increase in production of crops.

Modern farming methods require a great deal of capital. Small farmers usually need to borrow money to arrange for the capital and are put to great distress to repay the loan. Therefore, capital to is a scarce factor of production, particularly for the small farmers.

Though both land and capital are scarce, there is a basic difference between the two factors of production. Land is a natural resource whereas capital is man-made. It is possible to increase capital, whereas land is fixed. Therefore, it is very important that we take good care of land and other natural resources used in farming.

Extra Questions for Class 9 Social Science

NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi

NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi

The Question in NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi are explained from each and every chapter in an easy language to understand by students. Also, it offers exercise questions for more practice and stands out as the best study material to clear all your doubts regarding the subject. This NCERT Class 9 Hindi Textbook Solutions PDF seems like a guide for students. So, access the links and download the NCERT book Solutions for Class 9 Hindi, for future reference.

All Chapters NCERT Class 9 Hindi Solutions – Free PDF Download

According to the latest CBSE Class 9 Hindi syllabus, the chapters are divided into four parts such as Kritika Bhag 1, Kshitij Bhag 1, Sanchayan Bhag 1, and Sparsh Bhag 1. All these parts are involved in the NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi. So, students can find all parts of the 9th class Hindi subject in one place for a better understanding of the concepts and write Hindi exam very well. So, download chapter-wise NCERT Solutions of Class 9 Hindi Kshitij, Kritika, Sparsh, Sanchayan from below quick links & ace up your preparation.

NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi are the part of NCERT Solutions for Class 9. Here we have given CBSE Hindi NCERT Solutions Class 9.

Hindi NCERT Solutions Class 9

NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi – A

NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi Kshitij Bhag 1 क्षितिज भाग 1

गद्य – खंड

काव्य – खंड

NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi Kritika Bhag 1 कृतिका भाग 1

NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi – B

NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi Sparsh Bhag 1 स्पर्श भाग 1

गद्य – खंड

काव्य – खंड

NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi Sanchayan Bhag 1 संचयन भाग 1

Advantages of NCERT Solutions For Class 9 Hindi

One of the most important study resources to secure more marks in the exams is NCERT Class 9 Hindi Book Solutions PDF. Here are some of the NCERT Solution for Class 9 Hindi Advantages:

  • In Ncert Class 9 Hindi Solutions Book, you will see the questions and answers covered in all four books such as Kshitij, Kritika, Sparsh, Sanchayan.
  • You can get the answers in a simple and conceptual way for easy understanding.
  • As per the latest CBSE guidelines, subject experts prepare the solutions for the questions in NCERT textbooks.
  • All these solutions are very important to students because it improves subject knowledge, Hindi grammar skills, and also strengthen students strong basics on the subject.
  • The quality of all questions and answers is top-notch and there are no chances of any mistake.

FAQs on NCERT 9th Class Hindi Solutions PDF

1. Why Should I Download NCERT 9th Class Hindi Solution Book?

Some of the students feel Hindi subject is difficult to secure good marks. But actually, it is one of the easiest subjects of all to score good grades in the final exams. All solutions are explained in a simple manner and they are prepared by the experienced subject teachers.

2. Where can I get the solutions for the Class 9 Hindi NCERT Nooks?

At Learninsta.com, the team and subject experts provide subject-wise and chapter-wise solutions for all Class 9 NCERT Hindi Textbooks in pdf format.

3. How to use the chapter-wise NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi?

We have provided the solutions as per the chapters in the Kritika-I, Kshitij-I, Sparsh-I, and Sanchayan-I parts in the NCERT CBSE Class 9 Hindi Solutions PDF. Simply click on the respective chapter link and make use of the NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi.

Conclusion

We expect the provided NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Hindi Kshitij, Kritika, Sparsh, Sanchayan will assist you during preparation. Need to ask any doubts on the CBSE Hindi NCERT Solutions Class 9 क्षितिज, कृतिका, स्पर्श, संचयन, leave your comment below and we will reply back to very soon with the best possible answer. Moreover, visit our site for more updated NCERT Solutions PDF for other subjects.

Snake Extra Questions and Answers Class 10 English Literature

Snake Extra Questions and Answers Class 10 English Literature

Here we are providing Snake Extra Questions and Answers Class 10 English Literature Reader, Extra Questions for Class 10 English was designed by subject expert teachers. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-10-english/

Snake Extra Questions and Answers Class 10 English Literature

Snake Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Hunting Snake Extra Questions And Answers Class 10 Question 1.
Imagine that you are the narrator and have seen the snake at the water trough today. Write a diary entry about how you feel after having thrown the stick at the creature.
Answer:
11 June 20xx
I am very upset that I hit a snake for no reason. I saw it at the water trough. It had come to drink water as it was a hot day. I-stood there fascinated and waited for it to go. It was a beautiful creature and it looked harmless. I think that other creatures also have a right on natural resources like water. But once the snake turned to go, I hit at its tail with piece of fallen bough. I am so ashamed at the act. It was so thoughtless and unnecessary. I felt like the Ancient Mariner. I wondered if my action was as a result of self-preservation or is it human nature?

Snake Trouble Questions And Answers Class 10 Question 2.
The narrator’s friend comes to know about the encounter with the snake. Write a letter from the friend to the narrator, asking for more details and advising him about how to protect himself against snakes.
Answer:
11 June20xx
XYZ
Dear DH
I read your letter and I cannot imagine having a snake for a guest. But I did not understand that after admiring the creature, what was the need to hit it? What I can conclude after my observation is that man is selfish and cannot live in harmony with other creatures. Whereas animals only attack when threatened, man attacks without reason. I agree that human nature and the need for self-preservation is responsible for this act. Man must leam to live in harmony with other creations of God.
Yours Affectionately
PQR

Snake Trouble Story Questions And Answers Class 10 Question 3.
Imagine you are the water-trough. Write a description of what you saw on the day described in the poem.
Answer:
Today, it is very hot as it is a typical Sicilian summer day. All creatures are affected by this heat. I saw a snake come out of a fissure in the wall. It was drinking water collected near the tap. I also saw a man approach and wait for the snake to finish drinking water. I felt happy that he did not try to harm the snake.

The snake was relaxed in its movements and was moving slowly. The man waited patiently. But suddenly, when the snake started disappearing into the fissure in the wall, the man picked up a stick and threw it at the snake. The snake was surprised and it hurried off and disappeared soon, as it was upset. Why does Man think that he owns the world and no one else have the right to use natural resources?

Snake Questions And Answers Class 10 Question 4.
The snake goes back into his hole and tells his family and friends about how he was attacked by a cruel human. The newspaper ‘Snake Times’ carries an article entitled, ‘Never Trust Humans’. Write the article.
Answer:
NEVER TRUST HUMANS
It has been reported that a snake was attacked by a human. The snake had stopped to drink water near human habitation on a very hot day, as it had found water in a small clearing. While drinking, the snake saw a man staring at him but the mail, seemed harmless, so it continued drinking. But when it turned its back, it felt something aimed at its back, most probably the man had attacked it with something. All snakes are warned against going near humans. They are the most unpredictable creatures and keeping a safe distance from them would be the best policy.

Hunting Snake Poem Questions And Answers Class 10 Question 5.
The narrator’s friend is a newspaper reporter. He writes an article about the incident, highlighting the battle between natural instincts and the effect of education on the way we approach the natural world.
Answer:
MAN VERSUS NATURE
By Staff reporter
Recently my friend reported an encounter with a snake. The snake was harmless and had come to drink water. It did not attack or even look remotely dangerous. There was no need to feel fearful but my friend attacked the snake because he believed that the snake was poisonous. I found his reasoning quite strange. Do creatures other than man have no place on this earth? If so why were they created? Why is man so selfish and his main work seems to be just hunting down animals? Why can’t he live peacefully as God wanted him to? Does he always have to show his superiority? This is a question all of us have to answer.

Hunting Snake Poem Extra Questions And Answers Class 10 Question 6.
Discuss the theme of the poem Snake.
Answer:
The poet wanted to convey the message that most animals have- harmless attitude and human beings must have patience while dealing with them. He regrets his decision of being inhospitable towards the snake. The value that can be derived from this is that man and animal must coexist in peace and harmony.

Snake Extra Questions and Answers Reference to Context

Hunting Snake Questions And Answers Class 10 Question 1.
A snake came to my water-trough
On a hot, hot day, and I in pyjamas for the heat,
To drink there.
In the deep, strange-scented shade of a great dark Carob tree.

(a) Who was the visitor the narrator is referring to?
Answer:
The visitor was the snake.

(b) Why is the narrator in pyjamas?
Answer:
The narrator was in pyjamas because it was quite hot.

(c) What is a Carob tree?
Answer:
It is a tree found in the Mediterranean region.

Question 2.
I came down the steps with my pitcher
And must wait, must stand and wait, For there was at the tough before me

(a) Why did the narrator come down the steps?
Answer:
The narrator wanted to fill the pitcher with water to drink.

(b) Why did he have to wait before filling water?
Answer:
He had to wait as there was a snake at the water trough drinking water.

(c) How did the narrator react to the snake?
Answer:
At first he admired it, but when it turned its back, he hit it with a stick.

Question 3.
He reached down from the fissure in the earth-wall in the gloom
And trailed his yellow-brown slackness soft bellied down, over the edge of the stone trough

(a) Who does ‘he’ refer to?
Answer:
‘He’ refers to the snake.

(b) Where had it come from?
Answer:
The snake had come from a hole in the earth wall.

(c) Describe the creature as depicted in these lines.
Answer:
It was yellow-brown in colour, with a soft, slack body.

Question 4.
He sipped with his straight mouth
Softly drank through his straight gums, into his slack, long body,

(a) What is being described in these lines?
Answer:
The manner in which the snake was drinking water is being described here.

(b) What is the attitude of the narrator?
Answer:
The narrator is respectful, admiring the snake and waiting for his turn at the water trough.

(c) How does his attitude change in the end?
Answer:
In the end he hits the snake with a stick.

Question 5.
He lifted his head from his drinking as cattle do,
And looked at me vaguely as drinking cattle do,
And flickered his two formed tongue from his lips and mused a moment

(a) Pick out the poetic device in the first line.
Answer:
A simile is used in the first line.

(b) Why has the narrator compared the snake to cattle?
Answer:
The narrator does so because at that time, the snake appeared as harmless as cattle.

(c) Pick put the word which tells us that the snake was not aware of the narrator’s presence.
Answer:
The word ‘vaguely’ indicates that the snake was not aware of the narrator’s presence.

Question 6.
The voice of my education said to me
He must be killed
For in Sicily the black, black snakes are innocent, the gold are venomous.

(a) Where does the narrator see the snake?
Answer:
The narrator sees it in the water trough.

(b) Why does he want to kill it?
Answer:
The narrator wants to kill it because it was a golden-brown snake and hence poisonous.

(c) What had the ‘voice of education’ taught him?
Answer:
It had taught him that snakes were poisonous creatures and had to be killed.

Question 7.
But must I confess how I liked him
How glad I was that he had come here like a guest in quiet, to drink at my water trough

(a) What is the narrator referring to in these lines?
Answer:
The narrator is referring to a snake which had come to his trough to drink water.

(b) What was the paradox as expressed in these lines?
Answer:
Though the narrator felt that the snake which had come to drink water at his trough was poisonous and should be killed, he felt he was like a guest and should not tTd killed.

(c) How did the narrator resolve the problem?
Answer:
The narrator threw a stick at the retreating back of the snake.

Question 8.
And as he put his head into that dreadful hole
And as he slowly drew up, snake-easing his shoulders, and entered further,
A sort of horror, a sort of protest against his withdrawing into that horrid black hole
Deliberately going into the blackness, and slowly drawing himself after
Overcame me now his back was turned.

(a) Where is the snake going?
Answer:
The snake was going into the hole.

(b) What are the conflicting views that the narrator has as he watches the snake?
Answer:
The narrator at first felt honoured, then wondered whether he should kill it because it was poisonous and finally he hit the snake’s retreating back.

Question 9.
And looked around like a god, unseeing into the air.

(a) What is the poetic device used in this line?
Answer:
The poetic device used is a simile.

(b) Who is being compared to a god?
Answer:
The snake is being compared to a God.

(c) What does the phrase ‘unseeing into the air’ tell us about it?
Answer:
The snake is relaxed and not focussing on anything in particular.

Question 10.
But suddenly that part of him that was left behind convulsed in undignified haste

(a) Who does ‘him’ refer to?
Answer:
‘Him’ refers to the snake.

(b) Why did it convulse in undignified haste?
Answer:
The snake reacted because it sensed danger after being attacked by a stick thrown by the narrator.

(c) How is the movement different from his earlier behaviour?
Answer:
Earlier, the snake was relaxed and moving slowly and lazily without any fear.

Question 11.
And immediately I regretted it

(a) What did the narrator regret?
Answer:
The narrator regretted hitting the snake with a stick.

(b) Why did he feel so?
Answer:
The narrator felt regretful because he had hit the snake without any reason.

(c) How did he feel?
Answer:
The narrator felt guilty and remorseful.

Question 12.
And I thought of the albatross
And I wished he would come back, my snake.

(a) What made the narrator think of the albatross?
Answer:
The narrator’s action of hitting the snake without any reason, and a fear of the repercussions he might have to face as a result of his act, made the narrator think about the albatross.

(b) Why was he reminded of the albatross? What does this refer to?
Answer:
It refers to the bird mentioned in the poem Rime of the Ancient Mariner where an albatross was killed by a mariner without any reason.

(c) Why did he want it to return?
Answer:
The narrator wanted to ask for forgiveness and atone for his sins.

The Man Who Knew Too Much Extra Questions and Answers Class 9 English Literature

The Man Who Knew Too Much Extra Questions and Answers Class 9 English Literature

Here we are providing The Man Who Knew Too Much Extra Questions and Answers Class 9 English Literature Reader, Extra Questions for Class 9 English was designed by subject expert teachers. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-9-english/

The Man Who Knew Too Much Extra Questions and Answers Class 9 English Literature

The Man Who Knew Too Much Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

Answer the following questions briefly.

The Man Who Knew Too Much Question Answer English Class 9 Question 1.
Why did his fellow trainees dislike Private Quelch?
Answer:
Private Quelch’s fellow trainees disliked him because each time one of them made a mistake he would publicly correct him. Whenever one of them shone in their work, he outshone them. He had a very patronising and condescending attitude towards them.

The Man Who Knew Too Much Question Answers Class 9 English Question 2.
“We used to pride ourselves on aircraft recognition.” How was their pride shattered?
Answer:
The pride of the author and his fellow trainees was shattered when Private Quelch announced that the plane was a North American Harvard Trainer even without looking up at it, adding that it could be identified by the harsh sound of the engine which was caused by the high speed of the airscrews.

The Man Who Knew Too Much Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

The Man Who Knew Too Much Class 9 Question And Answers Pdf Question 1.
“At first, Private Quelch was a hero in the eyes of his fellow soldiers.” Support this observation with suitable examples from the story in about 80-100 words.
Answer:
It is true that at first the narrator and the others at the training camp were in awe of the amount of knowledge Quelch .had about everything under the sun and that is why they had nicknamed him “Professor”. Therefore, the narrator says that when he was able to answer all the questions the Sergeant asked him about rifles accurately, it “enhanced” his glory in the eyes of his colleagues. At another place the narrator mentions, “He had brains. He was sure to get a commission before long.” Again, commenting on his hard working nature he writes, “He worked hard. We had to give him credit for that”, and again, “He was not only miraculously tireless but infuriated us all with his heartiness.” And finally he writes, “At first we had certain respect for him but soon we lived in terror of his approach.”

The Man Who Knew Too Much Class 9 English Question 2.
Private Quelch knew “too much”. Give reasons to prove that he was unable to win the admiration of his superior officers or his colleagues.
Answer:
Though everyone agreed that Quelch knew too much, he soon lost all their respect because of his habit of correcting his colleagues publicly whenever they made a mistake. If anyone shone at his work, he made sure to outshine them. He was always trying to patronise them and show off his knowledge to them. After a while they just couldn’t take his condescending ways any longer and steered clear of him.

The Man Who Knew Too Much Chapter Class 9 Question 3.
Attempt a character sketch of Private Quelch.
Answer:
Private Quelch was a dedicated, committed, and focused man. He had set his heart on becoming an army • officer and getting a stripe and he left no stone unturned to achieve his goal. He borrowed the traihing manual and read it thoroughly, even staying up late at night to prepare himself for the classes to be held the next day. He was very keen to acquaint himself with every aspect of army life and would badger his instructors with all sorts of questions till he got his answers. He worked very hard and during the long marches he never appeared tired or exhausted.

But with all his good qualities, he was not popular because of his habit of showing off and behaving in a condescending manner. If anyone made a mistake he was sure to correct them with no thought to the fact that he was offending their feelings. In fact, he did not even spare his teachers. The Sergeant and the Corporal were highly offended at his interruptions of their lessons and that is why he was sent to the cook house as a punishment by the Corporal. However, the punishment did not seem to have had any effect on his behaviour because he was heard lecturing the cooks on the correct method of peeling potatoes.

The Man Who Knew Too Much English Question 4.
You are the “Professor”. Write a diary entry after your first day at the cookhouse, describing the events that led to this assignment, also express your thoughts and feelings about the events of the day in about 175 words.
Answer:
21 January 20xx
Today was my first day at the cook house! It wasn’t as bad as I had thought it would be! But I was appalled to see how little the cooks know about cooking. Today I had to lecture them on the correct way of peeling potatoes. They have been peeling them so thickly that a lot of the vitamins are getting lost! By the time I complete my term here I will have taught them a thing or two.

After all, I was chosen by Corporal Turnbull for this task. I think he was greatly impressed by my knowledge of grenades. He let me give the whole lecture by myself. Even the Sergeant had been impressed by my knowledge of rifles. I have no doubt they think I am the best trainee in the camp! I know that I march the best and my hut is the cleanest. I simply love reading the training manual. I know the others call me “Professor” behind my back because of all my knowledge. I feel so good. I am eagerly waiting for my stripe. Only then will I fulfil my dream of becoming an army officer. I wonder whether I will get the Best Trainee Award

The Man Who Knew Too Much Extra Questions and Answers Reference to Context

Read the extracts given below and answer the questions that follow.

The Man Who Knew Too Little Class 9 English Question 1.
“I first met Private Quelch at the training depot. A man is liable to acquire in his first week of Army life together with his uniform, rifle, and equipment—a nickname. ”

(a) What was the nickname given to Private Quelch? Why did he get his nickname?
Answer:
The nickname given to Private Quelch was Professor because of his habit of sermonising.

(b) Where did the narrator meet him?
Answer:
The narrator met him at an army training camp.

(c) What do you think does the word “liable” mean in this context?
Answer:
The word ‘liable’ means ‘likely’ in this context.

The Man Who Knew Too Much Private Quelch Class 9 Question 2.
“When he hadfinished, he put questions to us and perhaps in the hope of revenge, he turned with his questions again and again to the Professor. ”

(a) Whom does “he” refer to and why was “he” looking for revenge?
Answer:
In the extracted line, “he” refers to the Sergeant. He was looking for revenge because the Professor had disturbed him during his lecture.

(b) What had “he” been lecturing the trainees on?
Answer:
The Sergeant had been lecturing the trainees on the mechanism of a rifle.

(c) Can you think of another word that has the same meaning as revenge?
Answer:
avenge, exact retribution, make retaliation for

Question 3.
“No Sergeant. It’s all a matter of intelligent reading. ”
(a) Who is the speaker?
Answer:
Private Quelch is the speaker.

(b) What had the sergeant wanted to know?
Answer:
The sergeant wanted to know whether he had been trained previously.

(c) What did the speaker mean by “intelligent reading”?
Answer:
By “intelligent reading” the speaker meant reading up the training manual the day before.

Question 4.
“That was our introduction to him. ”
(a) Who is the person being talked about?
Answer:
The person being talked about is Private Quelch.

(b) Where did they meet him for the first time?
Answer:
They met him for the first time at rifle training.

(c) What do you mean by “introduction” in this context?
Answer:
introduction means the action of introducing . In this extract, it talks about how the narrator and his batch mates got acquainted with private Quelch.

Question 5.
“In pursuit of his ambition, he worked hard. ”
(a) Who is being referred to as “he”? What was “his” ambition?
Answer:
Private Quelch is being referred to as “he”. His ambition was to become an army officer and to get a stripe before his peers did.

(b) Can you name some other word with the same meaning as ambition?
Answer:
aspiration, desire, goal

(c) How did “he” work hard?
Answer:
Private Quelch worked hard by reading up training manuals, questioning his instructors incessantly and drilling enthusiastically. He was also tireless on route marches and would march to the canteen like a guardsman when officers were in sight.

Question 6.
“At first we had a certain respect for him, but soon we lived in terror of his approach. ”

(a) Whom does the word “him” refer to?
Answer:
Here, “him” refers to Private Quelch.

(b) Why did the speaker respect him?
Answer:
The speaker respected him for his knowledge, intelligence and hard work.

(c) Why was the narrator terrified at his approach?
Answer:
The narrator as well as the other trainees, was terrified at his approach because Private Quelch lectured ‘ everyone on everything under the sun.

Question 7.
“He was not a man to be trifled with.,.He was our hero and we used to tell each other that he was so tough that you could hammer nails into him without his noticing it. ”
(a) Whom does “He” refer to?
Answer:
In this extract “He” refers to Corporal Turnbull.

(b) What does a man “not to be trifled with” mean?
Answer:
It means that he was not a man one could act frivolously with.

(c) Explain: One could hammer nails into him without his noticing it.
Answer:
This exaggerated claim meant that Corporal Turnbull was an immensely strong and sturdy man.

Question 8.
“The squad listened in cowed, horrified kind of silence ”
(a) What was the squad doing at this time?
Answer:
The squad was learning about a grenade from Corporal Turnbull at this time

(b) Why were they horrified?
Answer:
The lecture had been interrupted by the Professor and so the squad were scared of the reaction of the Corporal.

(c) Give the meaning of the word “cowed”?
Answer:
“Cowed” means quieted or subdued.

Question 9.
“Through the open door we could see the three cooks standing against the wall as if at bay. ”
(a) Give the meaning of the phrase “keeping at bay”?
Answer:
“Keeping at bay” means keeping a safe distance from someone or something.

(b) Why were the cooks standing against the wall?
Answer:
The cooks were standing against the wall because they were listening to Private Quelch’s lecture in their kitchen.

(c) Who were the cooks reacting against?
Answer:
The cooks were reacting against Private Quelch.

Question 10.
“Most of us could not help glancing at Private Quelch who stood rigidly to attention and stared straight in front of him with an expression of self-conscious innocence. ”
(a) Why did everyone glance at the Professor?
Answer:
Everyone glanced at the Professor to check his reaction as they were expecting Turnbull to give him some tough punishment.

(b) What did they expect would happen?
Answer:
They expected Private Quelch to be punished for trying to show off his knowledge to the Corporal.

(c) What does the Professor’s “self-conscious innocence” show?
Answer:
The Professor’s self-conscious innocence shows that he did not expect to be punished.

Class 9 Civics Chapter 3 Extra Questions and Answers Constitutional Design

Class 9 Civics Chapter 3 Extra Questions and Answers Constitutional Design

Check the below NCERT MCQ Questions for Class 9 Civics Chapter 3 Extra Questions and Answers Constitutional Design Pdf free download. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-9-social-science/

Constitutional Design Class 9 Extra Questions Civics Chapter 3

Question 1.
Mention the number of states in the Union of India.
Answer:
Twenty eight (2006).

Question 2.
Mention the number of union territories in India.
Answer:
Seven (2006).

Question 3.
Give the dafe when the Constitution of India was Enforced.
Answer:
January 26, 1950, also called the Republic Day.

Question 4.
Who was elected as the President of the Constituent Assembly ?
Answer:
Dr. Rajendra Prasad.

Question 5.
Name the chairman of the drafting committee who drafted the constitution.
Answer:
Dr. B. R. Ambedkar.

Class 9 Civics Chapter 3 Extra Questions and Answers Constitutional Design

Question 6.
Name the three states which Originated in 2001..
Answer:

  1. Chattisgarh,
  2. Uttranchal,
  3. Jharkhand.

Question 7.
What is meant by the union territory?
Answer:
Union territory is the region where the government is under the direct control of the Centre.

Question 8.
For how many days did the Constituent Assembly meet?
Answer:
114 days.

Question 9.
What time was taken in the making of the constitution?
Answer:
2 years 11 months and 18 days.

Question 10.
Why tire Constitution is called a living document?
Answer:
The Constitution is called a living document because it has the scope of continuous development according to the needs, aspirations and the expectations of the people.

Question 11.
Name the countries from where the Constitution had incorporated some of the salient features.
Answer:

  • England,
  • Ireland,
  • France.
  • U.S.A
  • Australia.

Question 12.
Who set out the underlying philosophy of the Constitution?
Answer:
Jawaharlal Nehru.

Class 9 Civics Chapter 3 Extra Questions and Answers Constitutional Design

Question 13.
What is highlighted by the Preamble?
Answer:
The Preamble highlights the fundamental and noblest values and guiding principles on which the Indian Constitution is based.

Question 14.
How many items are there in the Concurrent List ?
Answer:
47.

Question 15.
How many items are there in the State List?
Answer:
66.

Question 16.
Which one of the three lists has Tnaximum of the items?
Answer:
The Union List.

Question 17.
How many subjects are there in the Union List ?
Answer:
97.

Question 18.
Which kind of citizenship has been provided in India?
Answer:
Single citizenship.

Question 19.
What are the provisions made by the, Indian Constitution to cope with a situation which is not normal?
Answer:
Emergency provisions.

Question 20.
By whom the residuary powers are enjoyed?
Answer:
By the Central Government.

Class 9 Civics Chapter 3 Extra Questions and Answers Constitutional Design

Question 21.
In which of the lists the subjects like criminal and civil procedure are included?
Answer:
In the Concurrent List.

Question 22.
Name some of the subjects included in the Union List.
Answer:

  • Banking,
  • Telegraph,
  • Defence,
  • Foreign affairs,
  • Atomic Energy etc.

Question 23.
Name some of the subjects included in the State List.
Answer:

  • Police,
  • Local government,
  • Agriculture,
  • Trade and commerce etc.

Question 24.
At the time of emergency which one of the governments has been more powers?
Answer:
The Central Government.

Question 25.
How were the number of seats allocated to the states?
Answer:
Each of the states was allocated the number of seats in such a manner that the ratio between the number of seats and the population remain practical.

Question 26.
What is Constitution?
Answer:
Constitution is a set of rules according to which the government of a country runs. The constitution also defines the composition and powers of the three organs of the government- the Executive, the Legislative and the Judiciary.

The constitution also explains the relations between the government are the citizens. The constitution defines the powers of the government so clearly that in order to make sure the government does not misuse its powers. The constitution protects the right of the citizens. In fact, every independent country prepares a constitution of its own as it signifies independence.

Question 27.
Explain in your own words the difference you find between the political maps of India, in 1947 and in 2002.
Answer:
The political map of India in 1947:
In 1947, when India got its freedom; it had provinces and several princely states. Many of its parts were still: under the foreign possession like Pondicherry, Yanam, Mahe, and Chandernagore were under the French rule while Goa, Daman and Diu were under the rule of Portugal, This also shows nearly 562 princely states independence. Hie political map of India in 2002: This map shows the present political condition of India. having 28 states and 7 union territories. In the present map of India, there is no foreign territory.

Question 28.
Why the Constituent Assembly is called the miniature India?
Answer:
The Constituent Assembly is called the miniature India because the members of the Constituent Assembly were from all of the parts and communities of the country. In fact, the Constituent Assembly did not only have the members from different communities and regions but also had the members representing different political parties. Hence, it was a miniature India in a very true sense.

Question 29.
Give a brief description of the Constituent Assembly.
Answer:
The Constituent Assembly had the great leaders like Pt. Jawaharlal Nehru, Sardar Ballabhbhai Patel, Maulana Abdul Kalam Azad, Dr.Shyama Prasad Mukerji, Sardar Baldev Singh. Dr. Rajendra Prasad was the President of the Constituent Assembly. Dr. B.R. Ambedkar was the Chairman of the Drafting Committee.

In fact, the Constituent Assembly had its members from different regions and sections of India. More than 30 members were from scheduled castes. The Anglo Indian community was being represented by Frank Anthony while H. P. Modi was representing the Parsi community.

Question 30.
Make a table of the languages which have been included in the Constitution.
Answer:
Assemse Bengali Gujarati’ Hindi Dogri Kannada Kashmiri Konkani Malayalam
Manipuri Marathi Nepali Orissa Santhali
Punjabi Sanskrit Sindhi Tamil Maithali
Telugu Urdu Bodo

Question 31.
Name the states which were carved out of in view of the popular demand much after 1956.
Answer:
In 1956 the states of India were reorganized for the first. But several states were carved out in view of the popular demands.

These states are

  • Gujarat,
  • Nagaland,
  • Haryana,
  • Mizoram,
  • Himachal Pradesh,
  • Manipur,
  • Meghalaya,
  • Arunachal Pradesh,
  • Tripura,
  • Goa,
  • Chhattisgarh,
  • Jharkhand,
  • Uttaranchal.

Class 9 Civics Chapter 3 Extra Questions and Answers Constitutional Design

Question 32.
How many members were there in the Indian constituent Assembly in December 1947?
Answer:
In December 1947 the Constituent Assembly of India had 299 members. 229 members among them were from the Indian states while 70 members were from the princely states.

Question 33.
Why has Hindi been adopted as the official language of the Union government?
Answer:
After the independence, the need of adopting an Indian language to replace English was felt.

The Constituent Assembly choose Hindi to replace English because of the following reasons:

  • Of all the Ind.ian languages, Hindi is spoken by a large number of the people. ‘
  • Hindi is understood by a large number of people.
  • Even the persons whose mother tongue is not Hindi can understand Hindi.

“Because of these plus points, Hindi has been adopted as the official language of the Union government.
However, an assurance was also given that so long as it is found necessary the non- Hindi speaking states have been given the liberty to use English along with Hindi.

Question 34.
What was the need of reorganization of the states after the independence?
Answer:
Soon after the independence, most of the princely states and the states were joined together so that the unity and the integration of the country would be maintained. But after some time the need was felt to reorganise the states because of the expectations and aspirations of the people and also because of their demands.

Question 35.
Why is Preamble very important?
Answer:
The Preamble contains the ideals and basic principles of the Indian constitution. The Preamble is riot a part of the constitution. The Preamble is neither enforceable in a court of law. No one has the right to go to the court and say that the. Preamble has not been enforced by the government.

Yet the Preamble is, very important as it serves as the guiding light of the constitution. The Preamble of the Indian constitution makes it absolutely clear that the Indian constitution stands for justice, Liberty, Equality and Fraternity.

Question 36.
What do you know about the Universal Adult Franchise? Why the constitution of India has adopted it?
Answer:
The term Universal Adult Franchise is meant by the voting right of the citizen. In India, every citizen who has completed the age of 18 years is able to participate in the election procedure.

This right has been extended to all the citizens irrespective of. their caste, creed, colour, religion, sex or status. Our Constitution has adopted this system to make India a real democracy. In a very true sense, this feature has made India the largest democracy in the world.

Question 37.
Write down the four ideals on what the Preamble of the of India emphasises. *
Answer:
The preamble of our constitution emphasises on the following four elements-

  1. Justice-According to the Preamble every citizen must get justice in every sector including social, economic and political sectors.
  2. Liberty-Each Indian must have the liberty of thought, expression, belief, faith and worship.
  3. Equality-The Preamble ensures equality of status and opportunity for all the citizens.
  4. Fraternity-It assures the dignity of the individuals and the unity and integrity of the Nation.

Question 38.
Explain clearly the meaning given to secularism.
Answer:
Secularism in India acquired a meaning different from the way it is. understood in the West. It means respect for all religious beliefs and practices, regardless of who and what number follow a particular religion. It also means that individual has complete freedom of faith and worship.

Question 39.
Explain as to how the European countries and India got their democratic rights.
Answer:
In Europe, people won democratic rights through long struggles against, the privileges of aristocrats and powers of monarchs. Sometimes, these struggles were highly violent. For example, during the French Revolution, hundreds of supporters of monarchy were killed.

In India, the struggle for democracy was carried on against the British colonial rule. It retrained by and large peaceful. With the adoption of the Constitution, all basic democratic political rights along with universal adult suffrage were introduced in India at one stroke.

Question 40.
What is the basic structure of the T Constitution?
Answer:
The Constitution of India does not describe as what is the basic structure of the Constitution. But the Supreme Court has done it.

The basic structure of the constitution is as follows:
“every provision of the Constitution is essential; otherwise it would not have been put in the Constitution. This is true. But this does not place every provision of the Constitution in the same position. The true position is that every provision of the Constitution can be amended provided the basic foundation and structure of the Constitution remains the same.

The basic structure may be said to consist of the following features:

  • Supremacy of the Constitution;
  • Republican and Democratic form of Government;
  • Secular character of the Constitution;
  • Separation of powers between the legislature, the executive and the judiciary;
  • Federal character of the Constitution.”

“The above structure is built on the basic foundation, i.e., the dignity and freedom of the individual. This is of supreme importance. This cannot, by any form of amendment, be destroyed,” The Supreme Court said this in its judgement on the Kesavananda Bharati case.

Question 41.
Explain terms such as “sovereign’, ‘democratic’, and republic.
Answer:
The Constitution proclaimed India to be a sovereign democratic republic. This three words-sovereign, democratic and republic are significant. Sovereignty means supreme power. It means the right of people to take decisions on internal matters as well as policies determining our relations with other countries. As the authority of the government rests upon the support of the people, people are sovereign. Democracy means people enjoy equal political rights.

They include right to form associations, right to criticise and oppose policies of government, right to contest elections and hold public offices. People have a right to elect a government through periodical, free and fair elections. Government is responsible to people and exercises powers only as defined in the Constitution.

No government can continue in power without the support of majority of people’s representatives in the legislature. People can change the government in elections. Republic means that the head of the State (President) is an elected person. He/ she wields power for a fixed term. India is a Union of States.

Question 42.
Compare the grant of the democratic rights as it came in the European countries and in India.
Answer:
European countries had developed industrially before they became full-fledged democracies. But in India democracy came before any such substantial industrial development. At the time of its Independence, India was predominantly an agrarian economy. Illiteracy was widespread. Poverty was rampant. This was an unusual experiment in establishing democracy in conditions of mass poverty. European countries had become strong nations by the time they became democratic.

The situation was different in. our country. The task of building the nation in real sense started after we became a democracy. In Europe and America expansion of democracy took place by limiting the powers of government. People there believed that freedom is possible if there is no unnecessary interference of government in private affairs of the individual.

So they fought for freedoms against absolutist governments. But in India, government was assigned a larger role from the beginning: We wanted the state to bring about all-around development. So the expansion of democracy in India has been bound with the expansion of government.

Thus in the history of the Western nations, expansion of democracy was associated with industrialisation, emergence of strong nations, militant struggles for voting rights and limiting the governmental powers. Those countries went through these stages one after the other, over a period of nearly 200 years. But in India democracy had to address these issues all at the same time.

The country has to industrially develop, build a nation and national government, transform social relations, and meet the basic needs of the people. The Indian state had to simultaneously pursue these, goals in a democratic framework.

Class 9 Civics Chapter 3 Extra Questions and Answers Constitutional Design

Question 43.
Write a brief note on the Directive Principles of State Policy.
Answer:
The Constitution prescribed certain guidelines for governments in making policies. These are called “Directive Policies of State Policy”. Their objective is to secure a social order, which promotes the welfare of the people. For example, the State should take steps for securing an adequate means of livelihood to all citizens.

The ownership and control of the material resources of the nation are to be distributed in such a way as to secure the common good. The economic system of the county is to be operated in a maimer so as to prevent concentration of wealth.

Men and women shall receive equal pay for equal work. Free and compulsory education, shall be provided to all children. Child labour shall be eliminated. The principles of socialism and. Gandhian ideals are incorporated in these Directive Principles.

Question 44.
Who proposed the Objectives Resolution? For what did it stand?
Answer:
The Objectives Resolution was proposed by Pt Jawaharlal Nehru on 13th December 1946. It was passed on 22 January 1947. Objective Resolution was in fact a document which contained the main objectives of the framing of the new constitution for India.

The Objectives Resolution stood for the. following objectives-

  • The Objectives Resolution dealt with fundamentals which were commonly held and had been accepted by the people.
  • The Resolution states that it is our firm and solemn resolve to have a sovereign republic.
  • It stands for a free India that can be nothing but a republic.
  • It declared that the Union would be an “independent Sovereign Republic” and it would be comprised of the autonomic units of the British and the princely states with residuary powers.
  • It ensures that the ideas of social, political and economic democracy would be guaranteed to all the sections of the people.
  • It also ensures that an adequate safeguard would be provided for minorities and the backward communities and the areas.
  • It also guaranteed that the people of India would be given the freedom of thought, vocation, association, expression, belief, faith, worship and in law and morality.

Objective Type Questions

1. Fill up the following blanks with suitable words-

(i) The Constitution of our country has taken ……………………… years ……………………… months……………………… days in its making.
Answer:
2, 11,18.

(ii) In the Constituent Assembly, the Parsi community was being represented by ……………………… .
Answer:
H. P. Modi

(iii) In the Constituent Assembly, the total number of the members from the states of the British India were ……………………… .
Answer:
296

(iv) The Objective Resolution was proposed by ……………………… .
Answer:
Pt. Jawhar Lai Nehru.

Class 9 Civics Chapter 3 Extra Questions and Answers Constitutional Design

2. Put (✓) before the correct sentences and (✗) before incorrect ones.

(i) The Constituent Assembly was not directly elected by the people.
Answer:
(✓)

(ii) Shyama Prasad Mukerjee was not among the leaders who guided the discussion in the constituent Assembly.
Answer:
(✗)

(iii) Constitution is a fundamental legal document.
Answer:
(✓)

(iv) British India was an independent, Sovereign and Republic.
Answer:
(✗)

(v) The underlying philosophy of the constitution was set out by Jawaharlal Nehru in his Objective Resolution.
Answer:
(✓)

Class 9 Civics Chapter 3 Extra Questions and Answers Constitutional Design

(vi) Yanam was possessed by France.
Answer:
(✓)

(vii) The Drafting committee was known as the miniature of India.
Answer:
(✗)

3. Choose the correct answer from the alternatives given here:

(i) The following was the President of the Constituent Assembly:
(a) Dr. Ambedkar
(b) Dr. Rajendra Prasad
(c) Gandhiji
(d) Nehru
Answer:
(b) Dr. Rajendra Prasad

(ii) The following was the chairman of the Constitution Drafting Committee:
(a) Dr. Ambedkar
(b) Dr. Rajdendra Prasad
(c) Gandhiji
(d) Nehru
Answer:
(a) Dr. Ambedkar.

(iii) India had enacted its Constitution on:
(a) 26th January 1930
(b) 26th November 1949
(c) 15th August 1947
(d) 26th January 1950.
Answer:
(d) 26th January 1950.

Class 9 Civics Chapter 3 Extra Questions and Answers Constitutional Design

(iv) India’s Constitution is:
(a) Flexible
(b) Rigid
(c) Partly flexible, partly rigid
(d) Neither flexible nor rigid.
Answer:
(c) Partly flexible, partly rigid

(v) India’s federating units are:
(a) 25
(b) 26
(c) 27
(d) 28
Answer:
(d) 28.

Extra Questions for Class 9 Social Science

Iswaran the Storyteller Extra Questions and Answers Class 9 English Moments

Iswaran the Storyteller Extra Questions and Answers Class 9 English Moments

Here we are providing Iswaran the Storyteller Extra Questions and Answers Class 9 English Moments, Extra Questions for Class 9 English was designed by subject expert teachers. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-9-english/

Iswaran the Storyteller Extra Questions and Answers Class 9 English Moments

Iswaran the Storyteller Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

Iswaran The Storyteller Extra Questions Question 1.
In what way is Iswaran an asset to Mahendra?
Answer:
He is an asset because he not only cooks delicious meals for Mahendra, but also follows him around uncomplainingly to his various postings. He washes his clothes, tidies up his shed and entertained him with stories and anecdotes on varied subjects.

Iswaran The Storyteller Question Answer Question 2.
How does Iswaran describe the uprooted tree on the highway?
Answer:
He describes it as an enormous bushy beast lying sprawled across the road.

Iswaran The Storyteller Short Question Answer Question 3.
How does Iswaran narrate the story of the tusker? Does it appear to be plausible?
Answer:
He narrates the story with a lot of drama and excitement, jumping about and stamping his feet in imitation of the mad elephant.
[The second part of the question is subjective, and either option is acceptable.]
If Yes: Yes, the story seems plausible because there are vulnerable points in the body that can be used to control a wild animal if one has knowledge of them.
If No: No, it seems to be a typical exaggerated story that Iswaran was fond of telling.

Iswaran The Storyteller Question Answer In Short Question 4.
Why does the author say that Iswaran seemed to more than make up for the absence of a TV in Mahendra’s living quarters?
Answer:
Iswaran’s stories were so dramatic and enthralling that Mahendra was completely captivated by them. As these stories were an everyday affair, he never missed the presence of a TV in his living quarters.

Extra Questions Of Iswaran The Storyteller Question 5.
Mahendra calls ghosts or spirits a figment of the imagination. What happens to him on a full moon night?
Answer:
Earlier, Mahendra would always look out of the window to admire the landscape on full moon nights. However, after hearing the ghost story, he avoided looking out of his window altogether in such nights.

Ishwaran And The Storyteller Question Answer Question 6.
Can you think of any other ending for the story?
Answer:
Instead of giving in to his fear, Mahendra could have decided to check on the ‘ghost’, and found out that it was Iswaran who had been acting as a ghost to justify his story.

Ishwaran And The Storyteller Extra Questions Question 7.
What work did Mahendra do?
Answer:
Mahendra was a junior supervisor in a firm that supplied supervisors on hire at various construction sites, factories, bridges, dams, etc. His work was to keep an eye on the activities at these sites.

Extra Questions For Class 9 English Moments Chapter 3 Question 8.
Do you think Mahendra was a fussy man? Give reasons for your answer.
Answer:
No, Mahendra wasn’t a fussy man, because it is written that his needs were simple and he was able to adjust to all kinds of odd conditions whether living in a tent in a stone quarry, or an ill-equipped circuit house.

Iswaran The Storyteller Question Answers Question 9.
Why has Iswaran been called an asset? Who was he an asset to?
Answer:
Iswaran has been called an asset to his master, Mahendra, because he took care of all his master’s needs, from cooking and cleaning, to washing his clothes. He also could cook the most delicious meals in the most desolate places where resources were difficult to get. Also, he entertained his master with wonderful stories and anecdotes at meal times.

Question Answer Of Iswaran The Storyteller Question 10.
How did Iswaran spend his day after his master left for work?
Answer:
Iswaran would tidy up the shed, wash the clothes, have a leisurely bath while muttering his prayers. After lunch, he .would read for a while before dozing off to sleep.

Iswaran The Storyteller Question And Answer Question 11.
Do you think his choice of literature had anything to do with his storytelling abilities? Give reasons for your answer.
Answer:
Yes, in my opinion the fact that his favourite crime thrillers in Tamil were filled with imaginative descriptions and narrative flourishes added to his narration, as he would try to work in suspense and a surprising ending into the account.

Iswaran The Storyteller Class 9 Extra Questions And Answers Question 12.
Why according to Iswaran, had the tusker escaped from the timber yard?
Answer:
According to Iswaran the tusker had escaped from the timber yard because it had gone mad.

Iswaran The Storyteller Extra Questions And Answers Question 13.
Why did Iswaran decide that the tusker had gone mad?
Answer:
Iswaran decided that the tusker had gone mad because it began to roam around, stamping on bushes, tearing up wild creepers and breaking branches at will.

Iswaran The Storyteller Questions And Answers Question 14.
How had Iswaran controlled the elephant?
Answer:
He did so by hitting him hard on the third toenail, which had temporarily paralysed its nervous system. He called it the Japanese art of karate or ju-jitsu.

Iswaran The Storyteller Extra Question Answer Question 15.
What were the types of stories that Iswaran liked to recount? Why did Mahendra like them so much?
Answer:
He recounted stories packed with adventure, horror and suspense, and Mahendra enjoyed them because of the way in which they were told.

Question 16.
Why did Iswaran prepare a special dinner one night?
Answer:
He did so because according to him it was the auspicious day on which traditionally delicacies were prepared to feed the spirits of one’s ancestors.

Question 17.
How had Iswaran stumbled upon the fact that the entire factory area that they were occupying had been a burial ground?
Answer:
He had seen a human skull lying on the path and came across a number of skulls and bones in that area. He claimed that he had also seen ghosts at night.

Question 18.
Do you think Mahendra was fearful of ghosts? Give reasons for your answer.
Answer:
Yes, Mahendra seems to be fearful of ghosts for several reasons. Firstly, he shivered in response to Iswaran’s description of the woman ghost, and then started feeling a sense of unease at night. He kept peering into the darkness outside the window to make sure there was no movement of dark shapes. He also lost his fascination for looking out at the milky-white landscape on moonlit nights.

Question 19.
What made Mahendra look out of his window even though he had started avoiding doing so?
Answer:
The low, guttural moaning sound coming from just outside his window woke him up from his sleep, and as the sound became louder he could not resist the temptation of looking out of the window.

Question 20.
What did Mahendra see outside his window one dark night when he was woken up by a moaning sound? How did it affect him?
Answer:
He saw a dark, cloudy form clutching a bundle. He broke into a cold sweat and fell back on his pillow, panting. However, on reasoning with himself, he calmed himself and concluded that it had probably been some kind of auto-suggestion or a trick played by his subconscious mind.

Question 21.
How did Iswaran remind Mahendra of the supernatural experience he had had the previous night?
Answer:
He told Mahendra that he had seen the ghost the previous night, when he had come running after hearing the moaning coming from his master’s room.

Question 22.
How did Mahendra react to his ghostly misadventure?
Answer:
He handed in his papers at the office and resolved to leave the haunted place the very next day.

Question 23.
How did Mahendra react to Iswaran’s comment about the factory being built on a burial ground?
Answer:
Mahendra shivered with fear, called him crazy and scolded him for talking nonsense.

Question 24.
Why was Mahendra surprised at Iswaran’s behaviour the morning after he had scolded him?
Answer:
Mahendra was surprised to see that instead of sulking, Iswaran was his usual cheerful self, and did not show any sign of anger or resentment at having been scolded the previous night.

Question 25.
Do you think Iswaran had started the supernatural drama outside Mahendra’s window? Give reasons for your answer. [Subjective answer]
Answer:
Yes, it appears to have been staged, because he probably wanted to teach Mahendra a lesson for having scolded him for making up the story about the woman and the ghosts the previous night.
No, he couldn’t have staged it because had seen skulls and bones in the area and had found out that it had been a burial ground in the past. He truly believed in these facts, and would not stage such a drama since he actually believed in the ghosts.

Iswaran the Storyteller Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Do you think the title ‘Iswaran the Storyteller’ is appropriate?
Answer:
Yes, I feel the title is appropriate for the story as the story revolves around the anecdotes and stories told by the mainhero or protagonist of the story, Iswaran. Iswaran works for his master Mahendra, a bachelor who is a junior supervisor working in remote construction sites. The only source of entertainment for him is the stories that Iswaran tells him every day at dinnertime.

Not only are his stories exciting, thrilling and dramatic—heavily influenced by the Tamil thrillers Iswaran loves to read—his method of presenting his stories is also unique. He expresses himself with a lot of drama and often leaves the listener wanting more at crucial moments, thereby increasing their interest in the story. Even recounting simple, everyday occurrences like seeing a fallen tree on the road is an occasion for him to create stories where the tree is described as a fallen animal.

Question 2.
Describe the incident with the tusker. What does it reveal about Iswaran’s character?
Answer:
The story about the tusker was one of the real life incidents that Iswaran recounted to entertain his master. According to Iswaran, the tusker had escaped from the timber yard where he worked, and began roaming around stomping on bushes, breaking branches and tearing up creepers. Upon reaching town, it had broken down fences, smashed all the fruit stalls, mud pots and clothes. People ran helter-skelter in panic, when finally it entered the school ground where children were playing. All the children ran into the classrooms and shut the door tightly.

The elephant pulled out the football goalpost, tore down the volleyball net and kicked and flattened the drum kept for water, before uprooting the shrubs growing around the ground. There was no one to be seen on the roads, when young Iswaran jumped up, grabbed a cane from one ofthis teachers and ran down to face the rampaging elephant. The elephant looked at the approaching boy, lifted its trunk and trumpeted loudly.

At that moment, the boy moved forward and mustering all his force, whacked him on its third toenail. The beast looked stunned for a moment, shivered from head to foot and then collapsed. This story revealed Iswaran’s talent as a storyteller and the fanfare and drama with which he recounted his stories. It also reveals that Iswaran was fond of embellishing his stories.

Question 3.
Iswaran was a fantastic storyteller. Comment.
Answer:
Iswaran was definitely a fantastic storyteller and knew how to engage the complete attention and interest of his listeners. He knew how to make even an ordinary event like a fallen tree sound exciting by describing it as if it was an enormous bushy beast lying sprawled across the road. Moreover, he could weave endless stories and anecdotes on varied subjects. His vivid descriptions were greatly influenced by the Tamil thrillers that he liked to read. Even when narrating the most trivial incident, he would try to work in an element of suspense and a surprise ending.

At the most interesting points of the story, he would often stop, leaving the tale unfinished and thereby increasing the listener’s interest. Finally, he would take his own time to conclude the story, In fact, his vivid description of the supernatural was so realistic that it forced his master Mahendra to resign and move away from the place that he came to believe was haunted.

Question 4.
Discuss the character of Mahendra.
Answer:
He was a bachelor who earned his living as a junior supervisor working at construction sites. He worked for a firm that supplied supervisors to remote sites. He was a simple man with simple tastes, and did not even feel the need to own a TV, even though he spent most of his time in remote areas far from sources of entertainment. He was very adjusting and accommodating, and could live wherever he was posted, whether in a tent or a dilapidated building. He was a kind and caring master, and his servant Iswaran was happy to follow him around wherever he was posted.

Mahendra seems to have enjoyed listening to stories, and would spend his evenings listening to the tales recounted by Iswaran. He was somewhat naive and gullible, and believed the stories Iswaran recounted. In fact, Iswaran’s stories about ghosts and spirits had such an effect on him that he even resigned from his job because he believed the area was haunted. He was convinced that he had seen the spirit of a woman with a foetus that Iswaran had told him about in one of his tales.

Question 5.
Describe the supernatural story recounted by Iswaran. What was its effect on Mahendra?
Answer:
Iswaran related a story about the supernatural on the day when, according to tradition, the spirits of one’s ancestors had to be fed. He started by informing his master Mahendra that the entire factory area had once been a burial ground. He added that he had seen a human skull lying on the path, and had come across a number of skulls and bones.

He further narrated how he had seen ghosts sometimes at night, and he described one particular ghost, an ugly creature with matted hair, shrivelled face like a skeleton, holding a foetus in its arms. Mahendra had shivered at the descriptions and had interrupted him sharply, calling him crazy and emphasising that ghosts did not exist. He insisted that ghosts were a figment of his imagination and that he was talking nonsense.

Extra Questions for Class 9 Maths with Solutions Chapter Wise

Extra Questions for Class 9 Maths with Solutions Chapter Wise

Extra Questions for Class 9 Maths: Here we are providing NCERT Extra Questions for Class 9 Maths with Solutions Answers Chapter Wise Pdf free download. Students can get Class 9 Maths NCERT Solutions, CBSE Class 9 Maths Important Extra Questions and Answers designed by subject expert teachers. https://ncertmcq.com/ncert-solutions-for-class-9-maths/

CBSE Class 9 Maths Extra Questions and Answers is an ultimate revision tool for students who are preparing for board exams. We have already compiled NCERT solutions for class 9 maths on our site. Apart from this important exam resource, CBSE Extra Questions of Maths Class 9 prepared by subjects experts based on the latest NCERT syllabus is essential for efficient preparation. So, we have listed chapter-wise NCERT Class 9 Maths Important Extra Questions with Answers in pdf formats.

Class 9 Maths Extra Questions with Solutions Answers

The NCERT Maths Extra Questions Class 9 with solutions and answers can be accessed from the available chapter-wise pdf links for free of cost.

  1. Number Systems Class 9 Extra Questions
  2. Polynomials Class 9 Extra Questions
  3. Coordinate Geometry Class 9 Extra Questions
  4. Linear Equations for Two Variables Class 9 Extra Questions
  5. Introduction to Euclid’s Geometry Class 9 Extra Questions
  6. Lines and Angles Class 9 Extra Questions
  7. Triangles Class 9 Extra Questions
  8. Quadrilaterals Class 9 Extra Questions
  9. Areas of Parallelograms and Triangles Class 9 Extra Questions
  10. Circles Class 9 Extra Questions
  11. Constructions Class 9 Extra Questions
  12. Heron’s Formula Class 9 Extra Questions
  13. Surface Areas and Volumes Class 9 Extra Questions
  14. Statistics Class 9 Extra Questions
  15. Probability Class 9 Extra Questions

We hope the given NCERT Extra Questions for Class 9 Maths with Solutions Answers Chapter Wise Pdf free download will help you. If you have any queries regarding CBSE Class 9 Maths Important Extra Questions and Answers, drop a comment below and we will get back to you at the earliest.

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 (2020-2021 Edition)

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9

Latest RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 PDF Download is available here 2020-2021 Edition. So, students can refer here to get RS Aggarwal Maths Class 9 Solutions Free PDF Download. With the help of uploaded Class 9 RS Aggarwal Solutions, CBSE Class 9 students can achieve good marks in Class 9 Maths. By preparing RS Aggarwal Maths Book Class 9 Solutions PDF Free Download, students can score more marks in Class 9 Maths.

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 (2020-2021 Edition)

Get Latest Edition of Class 9 Maths RS Aggarwal Solutions Pdf Download on LearnInsta.com. It provides step by step solutions Maths RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Pdf Download. You can download the RS Aggarwal Class 9 Maths Solutions with Free PDF download option, which contains chapter wise solutions. In Maths Class 9 RS Aggarwal Solutions all questions are solved and explained by expert Mathematic teachers as per CBSE board guidelines. By studying these RS Aggarwal Maths Solutions Class 9 you can easily get good marks in CBSE Class 9 Examinations.

RS Aggarwal Class 9 Solutions 2020 Edition for 2021 Examinations

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 1 Real Numbers

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 2 Polynomials

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 3 Introduction to Euclid’s Geometry

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 4 Angles, Lines and Triangles

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 5 Congruence of Triangles and Inequalities in a Triangle

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 6 Coordinate Geometry

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 7 Areas

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 8 Linear Equations in Two Variables

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 9 Quadrilaterals and Parallelograms

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 10 Area

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 11 Circle

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 12 Geometrical Constructions

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 13 Volume and Surface Area

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 14 Statistics

RS Aggarwal Solutions Class 9 Chapter 15 Probability

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions and Answers Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions and Answers Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution

Check the below NCERT MCQ Questions for Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions and Answers Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution Pdf free download. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-9-social-science/

Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution Class 9 Extra Questions History Chapter 2

Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution Extra Questions And Answers Question 1.
Who was Derozio ?
Answer:
Derozio (1809-1831) was a great advocate of rationalisnt. He too was impressed by the ideas of liberty, equality and fraternity of the French revolution.

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions And Answers Question 2.
Mention the two main objectives of the liberals of the 19th century.
Answer:

  1. They wanted changes in the old order.
  2. They adocated the ideas of religious tolerance.

Russian Revolution Class 9 Extra Questions Question 3.
What did the radicals want ?
Answer:
The radicals of the 18th-19th centuries Europe were opposed to the system of privileges and had wanted government of the common man.

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Very Short Questions And Answers Question 4.
Why were the conserve lives against the liberals and the radicals ?
Answer:
The conservatives were against the liberals and the radicals because, unlike them, they were opposed to changes in the system.

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions and Answers Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Short Questions And Answers Question 5.
Who was Guiseppe Mazzini ?
Answer:
Guiseppe Mazzini was a great nationalist of early 19th century Italy.

Extra Questions For Class 9 History Chapter 2 Question 6.
What is the main thrust of socialism?
Answer:
Property to be collective and its benefits be shared by all equitably.

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Questions And Answers Question 7.
Who was Louis Blanc?
Answer:
Louis Blanc (1813-1882), a French who wanted that the government encouraged cooperatives. The cooperatives were to be associations of people which produced goods together and divided the profits according to the work done by them.

Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution Questions And Answers Question 8.
When was the Second International formed? ‘
Answer:
In 1889, the socialists formed an international socialist body, called the Second International.

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions Question 9.
When was the socialist revolution launched in Russia?
Answer:
In October 1917; according to the Russian calendar, in November 1917.

Class 9 History Ch 2 Extra Questions Question 10.
Who was the emperor in Russia on the eve of Revolution?
Answer:
Nicholas Ii, also known as Czar.

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions and Answers Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution

History Chapter 2 Class 9 Extra Questions Question 11.
What was the type of economy in Russia until 1917?
Answer:
Largely, the agricultural economy, with a low level of industrialisation.

Ncert Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions Question 12.
When was the Russian Social Democratic Workers Party founded?
Answer:
The party was founded in 1898.

Russian Revolution Questions And Answers Pdf Question 13.
When was the Socialist Revolutionary Party (SRP) in Russia formed?
Answer:
The Socialist Revolutionary Party was formed in 1900.

History Class 9 Chapter 2 Extra Questions Question 14.
What incident is called the Bloody Sunday?
Answer:
The incident in which about 100 workers were killed and about 300 wounded by an attack on the striking workers, on a day which was Sunday, is called the Bloody Sunday.

Russian Revolution Extra Questions Question 15.
What is Russian steam roller?
Answer:
The imperial Russian army, the largest aimed force in the world, was known as the Russian steam roller.

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions and Answers Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution

Socialism In Europe And The Russian Revolution Class 9 Extra Questions Question 16.
What were Lenin’s ‘April theses’?
Answer:
A group of demands such as

  • war to be brought close;
  • land be given to the peasants;
  • banks be nationalized.

Ch 2 History Class 9 Extra Questions Question 17.
Which type of calender the Russian followed and what did it mean?
Answer:
The Russian followed the Julian calendar which was 13 days ahead of the Gregorian calendar. So the February revolution took place on March 12 and the October revolution on 7th November according to the Julian calendar. Until February, the Russians ‘ followed the Julian calendar.

Class 9th History Chapter 2 Extra Questions Question 18.
What type of state was Russia after the October revolution?
Answer:
Russia (changed to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republic USSR in December, 1922) was a one-party state after the October revolution.

Class 9 Chapter 2 History Extra Questions Question 19.
Describe briefly the demands of the liberals of the 18th-19th centuries Europe.
Answer:
The liberals of the 18th-19th centuries Europe opposed

  • the uncontrolled power and absolutism of dynastic rulers;
  • they wanted to safeguard the rights of individuals against government;
  • they argued for a representative, elected parliamentary government, subject to laws interpreted by a well-trained judiciary that was independent of rulers and officials,
  • they felt men of property mainly should have the vote. They did not want the vote for women.

Chapter 2 History Class 9 Extra Questions Question 20.
Who were the radicals and what did they want?
Answer:
The radicals were those who wanted fundamental changes in the social and political systems of the 18th-19th centuries Europe.

In contrast, the radicals wanted a nation in which government was based on the majority of a country’s population. Unlike liberals, they opposed the privileges of great landowners and wealthy factory owners. They were not against the existence of private property but disliked concentration of property in the hands of a few.

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions and Answers Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution

Question 21.
Describe the major adverse effects of industrialisation.
Answer:
Industrialisation brought men, women and children to factories; Work. hours were often long and wages were poor, Unemployment was common, particularly during times of low demand for industrial goods.

Question 22.
Sum up the contribution of Marx and Engels.
Answer:
Karl Marx (1818-1883) and Friederich Engels (.1820-1895) were great socialists. They had argued that industrial society was capitalist. Capitalists owned the capital invested in factories and the profit of capitalists was produced by workers. The conditions of workers could not improve as long as this profit was accumulated by private capitalists.

Workers had to overthrow capitalism and the rule of private property. Marx believed that to free themselves from capitalist exploitation, workers had to construct a radically socialist society where all property was socially controlled. This would be a communist society.

Question 23.
What was Lenin’s perception of the Russian peasants?
Answer:
Lenin felt that the peasants were not one united group. Some were poor and others rich, some worked as labourers while others were capitalists who employed workers. Given this ‘differentiation’ within them) they could not all be part of a socialist movement. So he wanted to have the peasants in the second line of defence, workers being the first line.

Question 24.
What was the impact of World War I on Russian economy?
Answer:
The war also had a severe impact on industry. Russia’s own industries were few in number and the country was cut off from other supplies of industrial goods by German control of the Baltic Sea. Industrial equipment disintegrated more rapidly in Russia than elsewhere in Europe.

By 1916, railway lines began to break down. Able-bodied men were called up to “the war. As a result, there were labour shortages and small workshops producing essentials were shut down. Large supplies of grain were sent to feed the army. For the people in the cities, bread and flour became scarce. By the winter of 1916, riots at bread shops were common.

Question 25.
Give a brief account of the socialist society as was being envisaged in Russia after tire October 1.917 revolution:
Answer:
During the civil war, the Bolsheviks kept industries and banks nationalised. They permitted peasants to cultivate the land that had been socialised, the Bolsheviks used confiscated land to demonstrate what collective works could be, A process of centralised planning was introduced.

Officials assessed how the economy could work and set targets for a five-year period. On this basis, they made the Five Year Plans. The government fixed all prices to promote industrial growth during the first two ‘Plans’.

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions and Answers Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution

Question 26.
What were the economic, social and political- causes of the October 1917 Revolution in Russia.
Answer:
Politically, the people of Russia resented the autocracy of Czar Nicholas II. The losses that the Russian suffered during World War I further weakened Russia’s view of Nicholas. Socially, Czarist Russia stood well behind the rest of Europe in its industry and farming, resulting in few opportunities for fair advancement on the part of peasants and industrial workers. Economically, widespread inflation in Russia contributed to the revolution.

I. Economic courses

Russia’s outdated economy and the Tsar’s failure to modernise it constituted one great cause of the Russian Revolution. Its agricultural, economy still resembled that of medieval Europe, with peasants bound to an inefficiently managed village commune, and using outdated farming methods.

Factory workers also suffered due to Russia’s young industry that sought to catch up with the rest of Europe. They had to endure terrible working conditions, including twelve to fourteen hour days and low wages.

Peasant’s conditions constituted another cause. They led a miserable life with no infrastructure supporting them. By 1917, famine threatened many of the larger cities, Nicholas’s failure to solve his country’s economic suffering and communism’s promise to do just that comprised the core of the Revolution.

II. Social Causes

The social causes of the Russian Revolution mainly came from centuries of oppression towards the lower classes by the Czarist relgime and Nicholas’s failures in World War I- While rural agrarian peasants had been emancipated from serfdom in 1861, they still resented paying redemption payments to tire state, and demanded the land they Worked.

The rapid industrialisation of Russia also resulted in urban overcrowding and poor conditions for urban industrial workers. There was also no running water, and piles of human manure were a threat to the health of the workers.

The World War I then only added to the chads. Conscription swept up the unwilling in all parts of Russia. The vast demand for factory production of war supplies and workers caused many more labour riots and strikes.

III. Political Causes

Politically, most areas of Russian society had reason to be dissatisfied with the existing autocratic system. They had no representation in government, and the Tsar remained out of touch with the people’s problems.

Dissatisfaction with Russian autocracy culminated in the Bloody Sunday massacre, in which the Russian workers saw their pleas for justice rejected as protesters were shot by the Tsar’s troops. The response to the massacre crippled the nation with strikes, and Nicholas released his October Manifesto, promising a democratic parliament (the State Duma), to appease the people.

Question 27.
Give an account of the global influence of the Russian Revolution and the USSR.
Answer:
Existing socialist parties in Europe did not wholly approve of the way the Bolsheviks took power and kept it. However, the possibility of a workers state fired peoples imagination across the world. In many countries, communist parties were formed- like the Communist Party of Great Britain.

The Bolsheviks encouraged colonial peoples to follow their experiments. Many non-Russians from outside the USSR participated in the Conference of the Peoples of the East (1920) and the Bolshevik-founded Comintern (an international union of pro-Bolshevik socialist parties). By the 1950s it was acknowledged within the country that the style of government in the USSR was hot in keeping with the ideals of the Russian Revolution.

A backward country had become a great power. Its industries and agriculture had developed and the poor were being fed. But it had denied the essential freedoms to its citizens and carried out its developmental projects through repressive policies. By the end of the twentieth century, the international reputation of the USSR as a socialist country had declined though it was recognised that socialist ideals still, enjoyed respect among its people.

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions and Answers Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution

Objective Type Questions

1. Select the correct word given in the bracket and fill in the blanks:

Question 1.
……………… opposed the uncontrolled powers of the dynastic rulers. (Liberals, Conservatives)
Answer:
Liberals

Question 2.
………………… . was an English manufacture who believed in cooperative community called New Harmony. (Robert Owen, Charles Fourier)
Answer:
Robert Owen

Question 3.
Louis Blanc was ……………….. socialist. (Russian, French)
Answer:
French

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions and Answers Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution

Question 4.
………………. ruled Russia in 1914. (Nicholas I, Nicholas II)
Answer:
Nicholas II

Question 5.
……………….. was leader of the Bolshevik Party. (Lenin, Plekhanov)
Answer:
Lenin.

2. Choose true (✓ ) and false (✗) from the following:

Question 1.
During the World War I, Great Britain, France, Turkey formed one alliance.
Answer:
(✗)

Question 2.
Russia withdrew from the World War I in 1915.
Answer:
(✗)

Question 3.
Duma in Russian is a word which means parliament.
Answer:
(✓ )

Question 4.
Lenin had his demands in his May theses.
Answer:
(✗)

Question 5.
Lenin succeeded after Stalin’s death.
Answer:
(✗)

3. Choose the correct answer from the four alternatives given below:

Question 1.
Second International was convened in:
(a) 1864
(b) 1889
(c) 1914
(d) 1921
Answer:
(b) 1889

Class 9 History Chapter 2 Extra Questions and Answers Socialism in Europe and the Russian Revolution

Question 2.
Who led the government in Russia after the October 1917 Revolution?
(a) Stalin
(b) Kerensky
(c) Marx
(d) Lenin
Answer:
(d) Lenin

Question 3.
One the following is correct:
(a) The peasants were a satisfied lot in February 1916
(b) They were a contended lot in February 1917
(c) They had no complaint against the government in September 1917
(d) They wanted the land that they tilled.
Answer:
(d) They wanted the land that they tilled.

Question 4.
The February revolution in Russia is called:
(a) Nationalist revolution
(b) Capitalist revolution
(c) Socialist revolution
(d) None of the above
Answer:
(b) Capitalist revolution

Question 5.
The following followed the collectivization programme in 1929 in Russia:
(a) Lenin
(b) Kerensky
(c) Stalin
(d) Engels
Answer:
(c) Stalin.

Extra Questions for Class 9 Social Science