The Interview Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

The Interview Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Here we are providing The Interview Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo, Extra Questions for Class 12 English was designed by subject expert teachers.

The Interview Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

The Interview Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

The Interview Class 12 Extra Questions And Answers Question 1.
Other than celebrities, what do some people think about an interview?
Answer:
Other than celebrities, mostly common persons think that an interview is the only and best source of truth. It according to them, is an art.

The Interview Class 12 Questions And Answers Question 2.
In which way do the celebrities take an inter-view?
Answer:
Celebrities find themselves as victims, they take interview as an unwarranted intrusion into their lives which somehow diminishes them.

The Interview Chapter Questions And Answers Question 3.
What did ‘Caroline’, the wife of ‘Rudyard Kipling’ write in her diary?
Answer:
Caroline wrote that two reporters from Boston destroyed their whole day on 14 October, 1892.

The Interview Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 4.
Who described interview like thumbprints on his windpipe and why?
Answer:
‘Saul Bellow’ once described interviews as being like thumbprints on his windpipe because he became exhausted by the interviewes.

Interview Questions Class 12 Question 5.
How Umberto Eco managed to write too much in his life?
Answer:
Umberto Eco started to utilize interstices: the empty space which according to him is enough with everyone.

The Interview Class 12 Questions And Answers Pdf Question 6.
How can we say that Umberto Eco had a wide range of writing?
Answer:
Umberto Eco was an expertise in semiotics and other than this he started to write fiction, literary fiction, academic texts, essays, children’s books, newspaper articles etc. So his versatility in writings can be easily understood.

Interview Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 7.
What made ‘The Name of the Rose’ a hugely successful novel?
Answer:
According to Umberto Eco, the most possible reason about the success of the novel was a time’s mystery and actually nobody could predict the exact reason of it.

Interview Questions English 12th Class Question 8.
What is Umberto Eco’s theory of interstices?
Answer:
Umberto Eco says about the elimination of empty spaces from the universe, from all the atoms and then the universe would become as big as his fist.

Class 12 Interview Questions And Answers Question 9.
How many copies of the novel ‘The Name of the Rose’ were sold?
Answer:
More than 10 million copies of the novel ‘The Name of the Rose’ were sold.

The Interview Question Answers Class 12 Question 10.
How and when did Umberto Eco start to write novels?
Answer:
Umberto Eco started to write novels accidently at the age of 50. Then only on Sundays, he used to write the content of the novels.

Interview Questions For Class 12 Question 11.
Umberto Eco does many things, but says, “I am always doing the same thing but that is more difficult to explain”. What does he mean to say?
Answer:
Umberto Eco says that he has philosophical interests which reflect in all his writings : fiction and non-fiction. In this way, he does the same thing, though he seems to pursue various activities : writing notes for newspapers, novels, teaching, writing essays, children’s books etc.

The Interview Ncert Solutions Question 12.
Despite the drawbacks, the interview is a ‘supremely serviceable medium of communication’. Explain.
Answer:
Despite its drawbacks, the interview has its own advantages. Though, interview is an intrusion into the personal life of the interviewee, it is always a supremely serviceable medium of communication. Through the interviews only, we get vivid impressions of our contemporary celebrities. We get a glance of their way of working.

Class 12 The Interview Questions And Answers Question 13.
What are some of the positive views on inter-views?
Answer:
Interview is considered as a reliable source of truth. Contemporaries and their success can be read through the interviews. A very important part of journalism is interview now a days.

The Interview Class 12 Important Questions Question 14.
Why do most celebrity writers despise being interviewed ?
Answers :
Most celebrity writers despise being interviewed because they have faced the fright of interview. Among them, interview is regarded as an unwarranted entrance into their privacy.

Interview Writing For Class 12 Question 15.
What is the belief in some primitive cultures about being photographed?
Answer:
Some primitive cultures believe that a person’s soul is stolen if he or she is photographed.

Question 16.
What do you understand by the expression “thumbprints on his windpipe”?
Answer:
“Thumbprints on his windpipe” expresses the block,age to any person’s freedom and privacy. It can be \ considered as a suffocation felt by the interviewes.

Question 17.
What in today’s world, is our chief source of information about personalities?
Answer:
In today’s world, our chief source of information about personalities is an interview.

Question 18.
Do you think Umberto Eco like, being Inter viewed? Give reasons for your opinion.
Answer:
Umberto Eco surely likes being interviewed as a part of his interview is presented in this chapter. He answers every question asked by Mukund and never frustrates and criticizes the interview like many other celebrity writers.

Question 19.
How does Eco find the time to write so much?
Answer:
Umberto Eco uses each and every moment of time. Even he is capable to utilize the little space between different act.s. So he calls it as usage of interstices; the management of time.

Question 20.
What was distinctive about Eco’s academic writing style?
Answer:
Eco’s academic writing style can be said as narrative which is personalised and interesting. Ecos writing style is not dull and boring; different from others.

Question 21.
Did Umberto Eco consider himself a novelist first or an academic scholar?
Answer:
Umberto Eco firstly considered himself as an academic scholar because he was a professor and wrote many academic texts while he wrote his first novel at the age of 50 accidenty.

Question 22.
What is the reason for the huge success of the novel, The Name of the Rose?
Answer:
The Name of the Rose is a serious detective story but delved into metaphysics, theology and medieval history. The novel got a huge success and the reason Umberto Eco assesses is its favourable publication time.

The Interview Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Give a character sketch of Umberto Eco on the basis of the chapter ‘The Interview’.
Answer:
Umberto Eco, a university professor at the university of Bologna in Italy, is an academician and a famous novelist. He, through various interview discloses his secret of success in life and never hates the interviewers. He has his taste in various fields of writings as academic texts, fiction and non-fiction, literary fiction, essays, children’s books, newspaper articles etc.

He always wanted to be called as an academician not a novelist. He used to participate in academic conferences, on the other hand, he avoided the meetings of writers and Pen Club Members. He has written forty scholarly works and novels only five. He used to denote time for writing novels on only ‘Sundays’. He discovered a magical trick of working in interstices.

He used to use even the seconds of his time. He captured the empty spaces for writing notes or any content. He had an expertise in ‘Semiotics’: the study of signs. He never became a slave of proud as he openely admitted that his novel ‘The Name of the Rose’ got success accidently and the time was in his favour. He didn’t have any attitude of the celebrity though his novel was bought by more than the 10 million of the readers.

Question 2.
‘Mukund Padmanabhan’ was a reporter from ‘The Hindu’. In the context of the chapter, re-veal his traits as an interviewer.
Answer:
Mukund Padmanabhan was surely a successful and well thought-out reporter who always used to ask answerable and dexterous questions to his interviewees. He used to plan and prepare to con-duct an interview of a celebrity. He never asked ugly or embarrasing questions and on the other hand, the celebrity whom he interviewed always seemed to be comfortable with his questions. Through the inteviews, readers not only got the informations

about the celebrities but many other important aspects of Mukund’s personality also came in their knowledge. He asked brief and quality questions to his interviewees scrupulously. He let the interviewees spoke in their own manner and never tried to interrupt or cross-questioned them.

His interviewees used to be free and frank with him. He was always a prepared interviewer. Mukund, in advance arranged the informations and personality traits of his interviewees and then with full preparations, started his sessions. In all we can say that Mukund Padmanabhan was a disciplined and dedicated interviewer.

Question 3.
Several celebrities despise being interviewed. Is this justified? Why? Why not?
Answer:
There are several celebrities mentioned in this chapter like Rudyard Kipling, V.S. Naipaul, H.G. Wells, Saul Bellow and etc. who dislike interviews very strongly. They never became ready to be interviewed. Most of them considered interviews as an unwarranted intrusion into their lives. They did not want to reveal the secrets of their personal lives.

Even an interview is considered as an immoral activity, as a crime or sometimes as an assault. They feel that the interviewers waste their precious time which can be used by them for more creativity. On the other hand, common mass take interviewes very positively as they come to know about the inner and hidden things of their ideals. But interviewes have their drawbacks also.

Celebrities feel shy and disappointed when they are asked for interviewes but they forget that they become famous and wealthy through the successful interviewes. General mass become their fan and devotee by knowing more and more about their ideals. Celebrities are even worshipped. In this regard, it can be said that interview cannot be termed as an immoral activity.

The Interview Extra Questions and Answers Extract Based

Read the following paragraph and answer the questions that follow:

(Para-1)

Since its invention a little over 130 years ago, the interview has become a commonplace of journalism. Today, almost everybody who is literate will have read an interview at some point in their lives, while from the other point of view, several thousand celebrities have been interviewed over the years, some of them repeatedly. So it is hardly supervising that opinions of the interview of its functions, methods and meritsvery considerably.

Questions :
(a) What is an interview ? What’s its place in journalism ?
(b) What is the relation of an interview with a celebrity ?
(c) What is an interview for a literate person ?
(d) Name the chapter and the writer.
Answers:
(a) An interview is a one-on-one conservation between an interviewer and an interviewee. It has a commonplace in journalism.
(b) Though, according to the text, most of the celebrities despise from interview but several thousand times, celebrities have been interviewed over the years, some of them repeatedly.
(c) For a literate person, an interview is an exciting content through which he comes to know about their idols.
(d) The chapter is ‘The Interview’ by ‘Christopher Silvester’.

(Para-2)

‘Yet despite the drawbacks of the interview, it is a supremely serviceable medium of communication. “These days, more than at any other time, our most vivid impressions of our contemporaries are through interviews.” Denis Brian has written. “Almost everything of moment reaches us through one man asking questions of another. Because of this, the interviewer holds a position of unprecedented power and influence.”

Questions :
(a) Despite the drawbacks, what is an interview ?
(b) Through which medium, how do we get most vivid impressions of our contemporaries ?
(c) How, according to Denis Brian, almost everything of moment reaches us ?
(d) Because of interviews, what position does the inter-viewer hold ?
Answers :
(a) Despite the drawbacks, an interview is a supremely serviceable medium of communication.
(b) Through interviews, we get most vivid impressions of our contemporaries.
(c) According to Denis Brian, almost everything of moment reaches us through one man asking questions to another.
(d) Because of interviews the interviewer holds a position of unprecedented power and influence.

(Para-3)

And then I have a secret. Did you know what will hap¬pen if you eliminate the empty spaces in all the atoms ? The universe will become as big as my fist. Similarly, we have a lot of empty space in our lives. I call them interstices. Say you are coming over to my place. You are in an elevator and while you are coming up, I am waiting for you. This is an interstice, an empty space.
Questions :
(a) What secret did Umberto Eco had ?
(b) What did Umberto Eco tell about the universe as well as fist ?
(c) What, according to the interviewee an ‘interstice’ ?
(d) What example did Umberto quote about an empty space ?

(Para-4)

That’s possible. But let me tell you another story, because I often tell stories like a Chinese wise man. My American publisher said while she loved my book, she did n’t expect to sell more than 3,000 copies in a country where nobody has seen a cathedral or studies Latin. So I was given an advance for 3,000 copies, but in the end it sold two or three million in the U.S.

A lot of books have been written about the medieval past for before mine. I think the success of the book is a mystery. Nobody can predict it. I think if I had written ‘The Name of the Rose’ ten year earlier or ten years later, it wouldn’t have been the same. Why it worked at that time is a mystery.

Questions :
(a) What does the American publisher say to Umberto Eco ?
(b) How many copies of that book were sold ?
(c) What Umberto Eco says about the success of the book?
(d) What is a mystery according to Umberto Eco ?
Answers :
(a) American publisher says that in a country where nobody has seen a cathedral or studies Latin, sale will not more than 3,000 copies of the book.
(b) Two or three million copies of that book were sold.
(c) Umberto Eco says that the success of the book is a mystery.
(d) According to Umberto Eco, ‘why it worked at that time is a mystery’. The sale and success of the book was a mystery.

My Mother At Sixty-six Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

My Mother At Sixty-six Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Here we are providing My Mother At Sixty-six Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo, Extra Questions for Class 12 English was designed by subject expert teachers. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-12-english/

My Mother At Sixty-six Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

My Mother At Sixty-six Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

My Mother At Sixty Six Question Answers Question 1.
What is the kind of pain and ache that the poet her mother might not live long with her. Therefore, feels ?
Answer:
The poet feels that her mother has grown so old that she couldnt grow older. She means to say that her mother might not live long with her. Therefore, the poet feels pain and ache,

My Mother At Sixty-Six Question Answers Question 2.
Why are the young trees described as sprinting’?
Answer:
The young trees are described as sprinting since the car is moving fast in the forward direction. The trees appear to move in the backward direction. In fact it is the car that moves not the trees.

My Mother At Sixty Six Question Answer Question 3.
Why has the poet brought in the image of the children ‘spilling out of their homes’?
Answer:
The image of children spilling out of their homes has been brought to show the contrast between the old age and the childhood. In childhood, one is full of energy. In one’s old age the person becomes pale and lifeless.

My Mother At Sixty-Six Extra Question Answers Question 4.
Why has the mother been compared to the Tate winter’s moon’?
Answer:
Winter is considered as the season of death and life lessness. All the activities come to a standstill. The old age is often compared with the winter season. A person in old age looks as pale as a late winter’s moon. Therefore the poet has compared her mother to the late winter’s moon.

My Mother At Sixty Six Extra Questions Question 5.
What do the parting words of the poet and her smile signify ?
Answer:
The parting words of the poet were, ‘See you soon, Amma.’ And then she smiled and smiled only. These words show that the poet do feel for her mother but she could not express her feelings properly in words. Her smile signifies that she wants to hide her feelings for her mother under the garb of artificial smile.

My Mother At Sixty Six Questions And Answers Question 6.
Having looked at her mother the poet looked at her mother, why does Kamala Das look at the children ?
Answer:
The poet is full of pain and ache when she looks at her ageing mother. She has grown so old that she might not grow older. This means her days on this earth are numbered. The poet looks at the children outside to divert her attention from the sad thoughts she has about her old mother.

My Mother At Sixty Six Long Question Answers Question 7.
What was Kamala Das’s childhood fear ?
Answer:
In her childhood, the poet’s heart was filled with fear whenever her mother was not with her. The poet now feels similar kind of fear since she senses that her mother has grown very old and perhaps she might not live long.

My Mother At Sixty Six Questions Question 8.
In the last line of the poem, ‘My Mother at Sixty-Six’, why does the poet use the word ‘smile’repeatedly ?
Answer:
The repetition of the smile indicates that the poet does feel for her mother, but she is unable to ex-press her feelings openly. She tries to hide her true feelings under the garb of repeated smile.

My Mother At Sixty Six Important Questions Question 9.
How does Kamala Das try to put away the thoughts of her ageing mother ?
Answer:
When the poet sees her ageing mother, she becomes full of pain and agony. She thinks that her mother might not live long. To put away the thoughts of her ageing mother, the poet starts looking out of the car. She starts looking at the children rushing out of their homes and the trees that appear to sprinting.

My Mother At Sixty Six Question And Answer Question 10.
What were the poet’s feelings at the airport ? How did she hide them ?
Answer:
The poet would become afraid when she did not find her mother with her. Her childhood’s fear now again, came to surface when she reached the airport. But she only said, ‘See you soon, Amma.’ And the poet could do nothing but smile and smile. The poet wants to convey the idea that the young ones do feel for their elders but they couldn’t express their feelings.

My Mother At Sixty Six Short Question Answer Question 11.
What were Kamala Das’s fears as a child ? Why do they surface when she is going to the airport ?
Answer:
In her childhood, the poet would become afraid when she could not find her mother with her. During her drive to the airport, the poet looked at her mother. The mother looked quite old and her face was white as a corpse. She felt that her mother was going to leave her for ever. In this way, the poet’s childhood fear surfaced when she was going to the airport.

My Mother At Sixty-six Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Extra Questions Of My Mother At Sixty Six Question 1.
Ageing is a natural process; have you ever thought what our elderly parents expect from us ?
Answer:
Ageing is a natural process. When the person be-comes old he becomes weak, he needs support .both emotional and physical. Thus, it becomes our duty to provide our old parents the love-, emotional support and respect they deserve. Our parents usually give us their best period of life to bring us up. Therefore it becomes our moral duty to reciprocate the same when they become old.

But unfortunately, due to rank materialism and nuclear family system the old people are treated as an unnecessary commodity. They are harassed and sometimes even beaten up. Many a time the old people are sent to old age homes, where they lack emotional support which the family can provide. It is very shameful for the younger generation. Our parents do not deserve such shabby treatment in their old age.

Question Answer Of My Mother At Sixty Six Question 2.
Write in brief the summary of the poem.
Answer:
One Friday morning the poet was driving in her car to the Cochin Airport from her parent’s home. Her old mother was sitting beside her. She had a glance at her mother. Her heart was full of pain to realize that her mother had grown very old. The poet’s mother was dozing, her mouth was opened and her face was as white as of a dead body. The poet realised

My Mother At Sixty-six Extra Questions and Answers Stanza For Comprehension

Stanza 1

Driving from my parent’s
home to Cochin last Friday
morning, I saw my mother,
beside me,
doze, open mouthed, her face
ashen like that
of a corpse and realized with pain
that she was as old as she
looked…

Questions
(a) Name the poem and the poet.
(b) Where was the poet driving to- ?
(c) Who was sitting beside her ?
(d) What did the poet realise with pain ?
Answers
(a) The name of the poem is ‘My Mother at Sixty-six’ and its poet is Kamala Das.
(b) She was driving to Cochin.
(c) Her mother was sitting beside her.
(d) She realised with pain that her mother had grown very old.

Stanza 2

… saw my mother,
beside me,
doze, open mouthed, her face
ashen like that
of a corpse and realized with pain

Questions
(a) Who is T ?
(b) What did ‘I’ realized with pain ?
(c) Why was the realization painful ?
(d) Identify and name the figure of speech used in these lines.
Answers
(a) The word T in these lines refers to the poet or the narrator.
(b) She realized with pain that her mother had grown very old and she might not live long.
(c) The realization was painful because the poet felt that she had to bear the separation from her mother soon.
(d) The figure of speech used here is simile … ashen like that of a corpse.

Stanza 3

Put that thought away, and
looked out at young trees
sprinting, the merry children
spilling
out of their homes, but
after the airport’s
security check, standing
a few yards away,I 
looked again at her,
wan, pale
as a late winter’s moon.

Questions
(a) Name the poem and the poet.
(b) Which thought did the poet put away ?
(c) What do the ‘sprinting trees’ signify ?
(d) What are ‘the merry children spilling out of their homes’ symbolic of ?
Answers
(a) The name of the poem is ‘My Mother at Sixty-six’ and its poet is Kamala Das.
(b) The thought that her mother had grown very old and might not live long.
(c) The ‘sprinting trees’ signify the childhood and youth.
(d) They are symbolic of carefree childhood.

Stanza 4

and felt that old
familiar ache, my
childhood’s fear,
but all I said was,
see you soon,
Amma,
all I did was smile and smile and smile…

Questions
(a) Name the poem and the poet.
(b) What was the poet’s childhood fear that now troubled her ?
(c) What do the poet’s parting words suggest ?
(d) Why did the poet smile and smile ?
Answers
(a) frie name of the poem is ‘My Mother at Sixty-six’ and its poet is Kamala Das.
(b) When the poet was a child she became frightened when her mother was not with her. Now the same fear troubled her.
(c) These words show that the poet do love her mother but she couldn’t find appropriate words to express her love.
(d) The poet could not find any words to express her feelings. Therefore, she did nothing but smile.

Stanza 5

… old
familiar ache,
my childhood’s fear,
but all I said was,
see you soon,
Amma,
All I did was smile and smile and smile…

Questions
(a) What does the phrase, ‘familiar ache’ mean ?
(b) What was the poet’s childhood fear ?
(c) What do the first two lines tell us about the poet’s feeling for her mother ?
(d) What does the repeated use of the word ‘smile’ mean ?
Answers
(a) This was the pain and agony that the poet often felt that one or the other day she had to suffer due to the separation from her mother.
(b) In her childhood, the poet’s heart was filled with fear whenever her mother was not with her.
(c) The first two lines tell us that the poet was deeply attached with her mother. Whenever she was not with her, her heart was filled with fear.
(d) It signifies that the poet tried to hide her true feelings under the garb of false smile.

Lost Spring Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Lost Spring Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Here we are providing Lost Spring Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo, Extra Questions for Class 12 English was designed by subject expert teachers. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-12-english/

Lost Spring Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Lost Spring Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

Lost Spring Important Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 1.
Who is Saheb? How can you say his name is ironic?
Answer:
Saheb lives at Seemapuri, an area situated at the periphery of Delhi. He is a poor ragpicker. His full name is Saheb-e-Alam. It means lord of the universe. But ironically Saheb is so poor that he can’t even afford buying footwear.

Lost Spring Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 2.
Whom did the author meet every day? Where had that person come from and why?
Answer:
Every day the author met a ragpicker young boy named Saheb, He had come from Bangladesh. There were many storms. These storms swept away their fields and homes. Tliat is why he, along with his parents, left his country

Lost Spring Extract Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 3.
What did Saheb find sometimes in the garbage? What did he do then?
Answer:
Sometimes, Saheb found a rupee or a ten rupee note. When he found a silver coin in a heap of garbage, he ’ didn’t stop scrounging. He always hoped to find more. He had entirely different meaning of garbage.

Lost Spring Extract Questions Class 12 Question 4.
What does the reference to chappals in “Lost Spring” tell us about the economic condition of the rag pickers?
Answer:
The rag pickers of the Seemapuri area , situated at the periphery of Delhi, are living a in very miser-able condition. They lack all the basic facilities of life. They are so poor that they can’t even afford to buy chappals. But to conceal their poverty they say that it is their tradition to walk bare-footed.

Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Extra Questions Question 5.
What promise did the author make with Saheb? Why had she to feel small?
Answer:
Saheb used to roam here and there. The author ad-vised him to go to school. But he said that there was no school in the neighbourhood. At this the author said that she would start school. But she had made this promise half-jokingly and was not at all serious about it. After a few days Saheb came to her to ask if her school was ready. She had to feel small. She never wanted to start a school. She said that promises like hers are frequently made but hardly ever kept.

Lost Spring Extra Questions Class 12 Question 6.
How does the author describe the area of Seemapuri?
Answer:
Seemapuri is situated at the periphery of Delhi. It is a sort of wilderness. Most of the people living here are Bangladeshi immigrants. They live in structures made of mud, with roofs of tin and tarpaulin, devoid of sewage, drainage or running water. They are about 1000 in number and most of these are rag pickers.

Lost Spring Question Answer Class 12 Question 7.
What was the full name of Saheb? What did it mean? If he came to know the meaning of his meaning what would be his reaction?
Answer:
The full name of Saheb was Saheb-e-Alam. It meant lord of the universe. It would be difficult to believe about the meaning of his name. He was not a lord at all. He was a poor ragpicker.

Lost Spring Question Answers Class 12 Question 8.
Why did the children not wear any footwear? What explanation did they give for it?
Answer:
The children were too poor to afford any footwear. They had become used to roam bare-footed. Different boys gave different reasons for not wearing foot wear. Some admitted that they couldn’t afford them while the others said that it was their tradition to move bare-footed.

Lost Spring Class 12 Question Answers Question 9.
Where have the people living in Seemapuri come from? Why don’t they go back?
Answer:
The people living in Seemapuri have come from Bangladesh. It is a place of green fields. Their land is very beautiful. But it is frequently swept by the storms. They had to starve there. Therefore they immigrated to India and do not want to go back.

Lost Spring Important Questions And Answers Pdf Question 10.
What was Saheb wearing one morning? Where did he get it?
Answer:
Saheb was wearing tennis shoes one morning. They were the discarded shoes of a rich boy. There was a hole in one of the shoes and thus that rich boy discarded it. But for Saheb who always walked bare footed even these shoes were like a dream come true.

The Lost Spring Question Answers Class 12 Question 11.
Where did the author see Saheb one morning? What was he doing there?
Answer:
One winter morning, the author saw Saheb standing by the fence gate of the neighbourhood club, watching young men playing tennis. He would go inside when no one is around. The gatekeeper allowed him to use the swing. But the game which he was watching so intently was beyond his reach.

Lost Spring Short Question Answer Class 12 Question 12.
The author says that Seemapuri is a place on the periphery of Delhi yet miles away from it, metaphorically. What is the meaning of her statement?
Answer:
Seemapuri is situated on the periphery of Delhi. But it is devoid of all basic amenities. Unlike Delhi it is not developed at all. Though it is quite near Delhi, it does not have any effect of the city. Therefore the author is quite right in saying that Seemapuri is a place on the periphery of Delhi yet miles away from it.

Lost Spring Question And Answer Class 12 Question 13.
What does garbage mean for the elders and the children in Seemapuri?
Answer:
Garbage to the elders is gold. It is their daily bread, a roof over their heads, even if it is a leaking roof. But for children, it is something wrapped in wonder.

Lost Spring Class 12 Extract Based Questions Question 14.
Is Saheb happy working at the tea stall? Why/ Why not?
Answer:
Saheb did not feel happy working at the tea stall. Now he is not his own master. He has lost his previous carefree look. He is no longer his own master. He now belongs to the owner of the tea stall.

Lost Spring Extra Question Answers Class 12 Question 15.
Who is Mukesh? What does he want to become and why?
Answer:
Mukesh is a young boy who belongs to a family of the bangle makers in Firozabad. He doesn’t want to adopt his family profession. He wants to become a car mechanic. He has seen that bangle making has given his family nothing but perpetual poverty. Therefore he wants to break away from his family tradition of bangle making.

Question 16.
What makes the city of Firozabad famous?
Answer:
The city of Firozabad is a hub of bangle making. Every other family is engaged in making bangles. Bangles are supplied to every comer of the country.

Question 17.
Under what kind of environment are the children forced to work in the glass blowing industry?
Answer:
There are about 20000 children working in the glass blowing industry. They are forced to work for long hours in very hot temperatures. They have to work sin dingy cells without air and light. They often lose the brightness of their eyes.

Question 18.
What kind of locality does Mukesh live in?
Answer:
Mukesh lives in a very dirty locality. The lanes there are stinking and choked with garbage. The homes in the locality are no better than hovels. Their walls are crumbling, doors are wobbly and there are no windows. There humans and animals live together.

Question 19.
What does the author say about Mukesh’s house?
Answer:
The author says that Mukesh’s house was like a half- built shack. In part of, thatched with dead grass, was a firewood stove. The author saw Mukesh’s sister-in-law cooking food for the whole family.

Question 20.
What is the opinion of Mukesh’s grandmother about her husband?
Answer:
Mukesh’s grandmother says that it is his (her husband’s) destiny that he was born in the family of bangle makers. She calls it a god-given lineage which can’t be broken. This shows that she has accepted her fate silently.

Question 21.
What does the writer say about Savita?
Answer:
Savita was a young girl. When the writer saw her she was wearing pink dress. She was sitting with an elderly woman. She was soldering pieces of glass. But she didn’t know the sanctity of bangles she was weilding.

Question 22.
Why can’t the bangle makers organise themselves into a co-operative?
Answer:
The bangle makers can’t organise themselves into co-operative because they have fallen into a vicious circle of middlemen who had trapped their fathers and forefathers. If they get organised, they are beaten and dragged to jail for doing something wrong.

Question 23.
What is Saheb looking for in the garbage dumps? Where is he and where has he come from?
Answer:
Saheb is looking for a coin or even a ten-rupee note from the garbage dump. He lives in Seemapuri (Delhi). His parents came from Bangladesh in 1971.

Question 24.
What expectations does the author offer for the children not wearing footwear?
Answer:
Most of the rag pickers roam about bare-footed in the streets. These children are so poor that they can’t afford to buy any footwear. But they told the author that it was their tradition to move about bare footed.

Question 25.
Is it Saheb happy working at the tea stall? Explain.
Answer:
Saheb starts working at a tea stall. He is paid 800 rupees per month and he is provided all his meals. Even then Saheb is not happy working at the tea stall. He no longer remains his own master.

Question 26.
What makes the city of Firozabad famous?
Answer:
The city of Firozabad is the centre of India’s glass-blowing industry. In this city almost every family is engaged in making bangles. These bangles are sent to every part of India.

Question 27.
Mention the hazards of working in the glass bangles industry?
Answer:
Working in the glass bangle industry has both mental and physical hazards. Mostly children are engaged in this industry. When they grow up, working in the industry for years, they lose the ability to dream. There are many physical hazards of working in this industry. The children have a very bad effect on their eyes. Their eyes are more adjusted to the dark than light outside. That is why they often end up losing their eyesight before they become adults.

Question 28.
How is Mukesh’s attitude to his situation different from that of his family?
Answer:
Mukesh doesn’t want to adopt his family’s profession of bangle making. This profession has in no way helped them to live a comfortable life. Therefore he has decided to become a car mechanic. He will go to a garage and learn.

Question 29.
What could be some of the reasons for the mi-gration of people from villages to cities?
Answer:
The villagers migrate to the cities because of the economic reasons; They come to cities to find better employment opportunities. In the given text Saheb’s ancestors migrated to Delhi from Bangladesh. Their fields and homes were frequently swept by storms. They had nothing to eat. That’s why they left their beautiful land.

Question 30.
Would you agree that promises made to poor children are rarely kept? Why do you think this happens in the incidents narrated in the text?
Answer:
It is true that promises made to poor children are rarely kept. The narrator, who is an affluent lady, promised Saheb that she would build a school. But she herself admits that she had made this promise half-jokingly. Thus we can well imagine that promises made to poor children are seldom or never kept.

Question 31.
What forces conspire to keep the workers in the bangle industry of Firozabad in poverty?
Answer:
There are many forces that conspire to keep the workers in the bangle industry in perpetual poverty. They are caught in the vicious circle of the sahukars, the middlemen, the policemen, the keepers of law, the bureaucrats and the politicians. The bangle makers are trapped by these forces and they are not allowed to organise themselves and form a co-operative.

Question 32.
How, in your opinion, can Mukesh realise his dream?
Answer:
Mukesh has decided to become a car mechanic. He doesn’t want to adopt his family’s profession. He wants to become a car mechanic. He says that he will go to a garage and learn. The garage is quite far away from his home. But he is firm in determination. “I will walk,” says he.

Question 33.
Why should child labour be eliminated and how?
Answer:
Child labour is a slur on the fair face of our society. It is a very cruel practice. Every child has the right to education. By educating children this evil practice can be stopped. The government has already framed the law that every child between the age of 6 —14 must attend school. However this law is not strictly followed. Social awareness can play a very effective role in this direction.

Lost Spring Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Where had the rag pickers come from? What value of life had been conveyed through their condition?
Answer:
The rag pickers had come from Dhaka. There they had green fields. But there were many storms that swept away their homes and fields. Therefore they had to leave their country and come to Delhi. In Delhi they are living a very hard life. They are living in Seemapuri, a place at the periphery of Delhi. There they are living in the structures of mud, with roofs of tin and tarpaulin, devoid of sewage, drainage or running water.

The value of life conveyed through their condition is that every government should take care of their people. They should be provided better employment opportunities so that they are not compelled to migrate to other country. In this lesson it been shown that the indifferent attitude of the Bangladeshi government has compelled its citizens to migrate to India.

Question 2.
What does the writer want Saheb to do? She has to feel embarrassed later. Why?
Answer:
Saheb is a rag picker. The writer sees him every morning. One day, the writer advised him to go to school. Saheb told her that there was no school in the neighbourhood. He further said that when one would be constructed, he would definitely go. The writer asked him, half-jokingly, if she started a school would he come.

Saheb replied in affirmative. After some days Saheb came running to her and said to her, “Is your school ready?” the Writer had to feel embarrassed at this because she had made a promise that was not meant.The writer wants to say promises are made to the poor but they are never fulfilled. She shows this fact by giving her own example.

Question 3.
Give a brief account of the life and activities of the people like Saheb-e-Alam settled in Seemapuri.
Answer:
Seemapuri is located on the periphery of Delhi. It is a slum area. About 10,000 people live there. They all are ragpickers and have come from Bangladesh in 1971. They are living in structures of mud, with roofs of tin and tarpaulin, devoid of sewage, drainage or running water. They have lived there for many years without permits but with ration cards that get their names placed on voter lists and enable them to buy grain. Food is more important for survival than an identity.

Wherever they find food they pitch their tents that become their transit homes. They are involved in ragpicking. It has acquired the proportions of a fine art. Garbage to them is gold. It is their daily bread, a roof over their heads, even if it is a leaking roof. For children, garbage is a thing wrapped in wonder. They often scrounge it to find some coins. On the whole we can say that the people living there are living a very hard life.

Question 4.
Where did the writer see Saheb one winter morning? What was he doing? What was he wearing in his feet?
Answer:
The writer saw Saheb standing at the fenced gate of the neighbourhood club, watching two young men dressed in white, playing tennis. Saheb liked tennis but he knew that game was beyond his reach. However he used to go inside when no one was around. The gatekeeper allowed him to use the swing.

The writer saw Saheb wearing tennis shoes . That looked strange over his discoloured shirt and shorts. Someone had given them to Saheb. In fact they were the discarded shoes of some rich boy. He had stopped them wearing because of a hole in one of them. But Saheb who always walked barefoot, even shoes with a hole was a dream come true.

Question 5.
“For the children it is wrapped in wonder, for the elders it is a means of survival.” What kind of life do the ragpickers of Seemapuri lived?
Answer:
The ragpickers lived in the area of Seemapuri located at the periphery of Delhi. Those who live here are the Bangladeshi immigrants. They came here way back in 1971. Seemapuri was then a wilderness. It still is but it is no longer empty. In structures of mud, with roofs of tin and tarpaulin, devoid of sewage, drainage or running water, live 10,000 rag pickers. They have been living here without any identity. They have their names in the voter lists and they have got their ration cards. It enables to buy them grain.

Survival in Seemapuri is ragpicking. For the elders ragpicking is their profession and means of livelihood. But for the children it is even more. For them it is a sort of wonder. They would sometimes get a coin or even a ten-rupee note in the garbage. They consider ragpicking an activity full of fun and excitement.

Question 6.
‘Garbage to them is gold; How do the rag pickers of Seemapuri survive?
Answer:
About 10,000 Bangladeshi immigrants live in the Seemapuri area of Delhi. Seemapuri is located at the periphery of Delhi. It is a wilderness. The rag pickers live in the structures of mud, with roofs of tin and tarpaulin, devoid of sewage, drainage or running water. They have been living here without any identity. They have their names in the voter lists and they have got their ration cards.

It enables to buy them grain. Survival in Seemapuri is ragpicking. They do not know no other profession but rag picking. They left their beautiful land of green fields because there were frequent storms and as a result their houses and fields would swept away due to them. As a result they had to starve. They pitched their tents wherever they find food. They could earn their food only by ragpicking.

Question 7.
What do you know about the city of Firozabad?
Answer:
Firozabad is the centre of,bangle making industry in India. All over in India the bangles are supplied from this city. But there is a dark side of this city also. Firozabad is a very dirty city. Every other family in Firozabad is engaged in making bangles. They have been engaged in this profession for many generations. Even then these people always remain poor. The children are also involved in making bangles. They are forced to work for long hours in very hot temperatures. They have to work in dingy cells without air and light. They often lose the brightness of their eyes.

The bangle makers are caught in the vicious circle of sahukars, the middlemen, the policemen, the keepers of law, the bureaucrats and the politicians. They are beaten and put to jails if they try to organise themselves. Also the bangle makers are very poor. The young men are forced to adopt their elders’ profession. Years of mind-numbing toil have killed all initiative and the ability to dream.In this extract the writer has depicted that picture of Firozabad which perhaps is not known to many other parts of India.

Question 8.
How in your views can Mukesh realise his dream?
Answer:
Mukesh is very different from the other members of his family. All the members of his family have subsided themselves to the profession of bangle making and considered it their destiny. But Mukesh wants to break these shackles of bangle making. He knows that the profession of bangle making has given them nothing but poverty. Therefore he wanted to become a car mechanic.

He hoped to alleviate the poverty of his family in this way. The garage is quite far away from his home. But he is determined to fulfil his dream. He says that he will walk all the way to the garage. This shows that Mukesh is quite a rebellious and determined boy. He wants to break away with his family profession of bangle making.

Question 9.
It is illegal to employ children in the bangle industry. Even then many children are employed in this industry in Firozabad. How?
Answer:
It is illegal to employ children in any industry in India. It is a punishable offence. But it is seen that this law is not followed or rarely followed. The children work for very less wages. They are very submissive and agile. They give almost the same or even more production as compared to adult workers. Therefore most of the factory owners prefer to employ children in their factories.

They are often able to deceive law. The reason is very clear. The vicious circle follows. There are policemen, middlemen, keepers of law, bureaucrats and also politicians. They all are mixed up to keep tender souls in the quagmire of hard labour. They kill all the initiative and zeal of the children. They become so. discouraged that they quietly accept all this a part of their destiny.

Question 10.
The bangle makers of Firozabad make beautiful bangles and make everyone happy but they themselves live and die in squalor. Explain.
Answer:
In Firozabad, almost every family is involved in the business of bangle making. Firozabad is the centre of India’s glass-blowing industry. The families here have spent generations working around furnaces, welding glass, making bangles for all the women in the land. But these bangle makers are very poor. They can’t earn enough to afford even two square of meals.

Even the children are forced to live in dingy cells without air and light. About 20,000 children work in the glass-blowing industry. They are forced to work for very long hours and also in very inhuman conditions. They often lose the brightness of their eyes. The bangle makers live a very miserable life. Though they make everyone happy by making beautiful bangles, they themselves live and die in very deplorable condition.

Lost Spring Extra Questions and Answers Extract Based

Read the following paragraph and answer the questions that follow:

(Para-1)

“It takes longer to build a school,” I say, embarrassed at having made a promise that was not meant. But prom¬ises like mine abound in every comer of his bleak world. After months of knowing him, I ask him his name. “Saheb- e-Alam”, he announces. He does not know what it means. If he knew its meaning lord of the universe he would have a hard time believing it. Unaware of what his name represents, he roams streets with his friends, an army of barefoot boys who appear like the morning birds and disappear at noon. Over the months, I have come to recognise each of them.

Questions :
(a) Why was the narrator embarrassed ?
(b) What was the meaning of the name of Saheb ?
(c) Why with his friends, Saheb roams the streets ?
(d) Name the chapter and the writer.
Answers :
(a) The narrator was embarrassed because she couldn’t fulfil her promise to start a school.
(b) Saheb’s name meant ‘Lord of the universe’.
(c) With his friends, Saheb roams the streets for ragpicking to scrounge for silver coin or some wonderful unex¬pected things.
(d) ‘Lost Spring’ is the chapter written by ‘Anees Jung

(Para-2)

Food is more important for survival than an identity. “If at the end of the day we can feed our families and go to bed without an aching stomach, we would rather live here than in the fields that gave us no grain,” say a group of women in tattered saris when I ask them why they left their beautiful land of green fields and rivers. Wherever they find food, they pitch their tents that become transit homes.

Questions :
(a) ‘Food is more important for survival than an identity’. Explain.
(b) Who said, “If at the end gave us no grain”?
(c) What did the writer ask to a group of women ?
(d) What are ‘transit homes’ ?
Answers:
(a) Food is more important for survival than an identity as for living a life, a person needs food continuously. Identity or any other thing is secondary, more important is food.
(b) A group of women in tattered saris said the aforesaid statement when the narrator asked them about their migration from Dhaka.
(c) The writer asked to group of women why they left their beautiful land of green fields and rivers.
(d) ‘Transit Homes’ are the homes which are not permanently constructed or settled, they are movable and mostly made with light materials as cloth, bamboos or dried grass.

(Para-3)

This morning, Saheb is on his way to the milk booth. In his hand is a steel canister. “I now work in a tea stall down the road,” he says, pointing in the distance. “I am paid 800 rupees and all my meals”. Does he like the job ? I ask, His face, I see, has lost the carefree look. The steel canister seems heavier than the plastic bag he would carry so lightly over his shoulder. The bag was his. The canister belongs to the man owns the tea shop. Saheb is no longer his own master!

Questions :
(a) What is paid to Saheb at tea stall ?
(b) Does Saheb like the job ?
(c) Why steel canister seemed heavier than the plastic ’ bag?
(d) ‘Saheb is no longer his own master !’ Explain.
Answers :
(a) At tea stall, Saheb is paid 800 rupees and ail his meals.
(b) No, Saheb does not like the job. He is a servant now.
(c) Steel canister seemed heavier than the plastic bag because the bag was his whereas the steel canister belonged to the man owned the tea shop.
(d) Saheb is no longer his own master means that now Saheb is working as a servant at tea stall, he has to obey the orders given by the owner of the tea shop. He is a slave now.

(Para-4)

Mukesh’s family is among them. None of them know that it is illigal for children like him to work in the glass furpaces with high temperatures, in dingy cells without air and light; that the law, if enforced, could get him and all those 20,000 children out of the hot furnaces where they slog their daylight hours, often loosing the brightness of their eyes.

Questions :
(a) What is illegal for children according to the writer ?
(b) Where do those children work ?
(c) What do you understand by ‘they slog their daylight hours’ ?
(d) What is the big loss they face working there?
Answers:
(a) According to the writer, it is illegal for children to work in the glass furnaces with high temperature, in dingy cells without air and light.
(b) Those children work in the glass furnaces with high temperature, in dingy cells without air and light.
(c) ‘They slog their daylight hours’ means that the children, during the day time, work very hard sitting there and waste their precious time which should be occupied in studies and various creative activities.
(d) The big loss they (Children) face working there is the loosing of brightness of their eyes.

(Para-5)

“It is his Karam, his destiny”, says Mukesh’s grand-mother, who has watched her own husband go blind with the dust from polishing the glass of bangles. “Can a god- given lineage over be broken ?” She implies born in the caste of bangle makers, they have seen nothing but bangles in the house, in the yard, in every other house, in every other yard, every street in Firozabad.

Questions :
(a) “It is his Karam, his destiny.” Explain.
(b) What does it mean : “Can a god-given lineage ever be broken ?”
(c) What happened to Mukesh’s grandfather ?
(d) What is the scene of Firozabad as per the above given description ?
Answers :
(a) “It is his Karam, his destiny” means that to work in bangle industries is their fate since birth and they have accepted it as natural.
(b) “Can a god-given lineage ever be broken” means that the grandmother in the form of the question declares that the descendency which they have got from their ancestors can never be changed.
(c) Mukesh’s grandfather had gone blind with the dust from polishing the glass of bangles.
(d) In Firozabad in every house, in every yard, in every other house, in every other yard, in even every street—only the bangles and glass prpducts are found and s6en everywhere.

(Para-6)

“Why not organise yourselves into a cooperative ?” I ask a group of young men who have fallen into the vicious circle of middlemen who trapped their fathers and forefathers. “Even if we get organised, we are the ones who will be hauled up by the police, beaten and dragged to jail for doing something illegal.” They say. There is no leader among them, no one who could help them see things differently.

Questions :
(a) What do you understand by a cooperative ?
(b) What is the vicious circle of middlemen ?
(c) Why do they not get organised ?
(d) Why are they unable to see things differently ?
Answers :
(a) A cooperative is an independent association of persons united willingly to work combindly for the same goal.
(b) The vicious circle of middlemen is a never ending domain of middlemen like sahukars, the policemen, the keepers of law, the bureaucrats and the politicians. The sphere made by them can never be broken nor be crossed.
(c) They do not get organised bemuse if they got organised, they were the ones who would be hauled up by the police, beaten and dragged to jail for doing something illegal.
(d) They are unable to see things differently because there is no leader among them, who could help them see things differently for their benefit.

(Para-7)
To do anything else would mean to dare. And daring is not part of his growing up. When I sense a flash of it in Mukesh I am cheered. “I want to be a motor mechanic”, he repeats: He will go to a garage and learn. But the garage is a long way from his home. “I will walk”, he insists, “Do you also dream of flying a plane ?” He is suddenly silent. “No,” he says staring at the ground.

Questions:
(a) Why word ‘dare’ is used here for bangle makers ?
(b) Why did the writer cheer ?
(c) What does Mukesh want to be ?
(d) Why did the writer ask, “Do you also dream of flying a plane ?”
Answers:
(a) Bangle makers are very fearful from the middlemen. To do or think anything else except bangle making is a sign of revolt which was found only in Mukesh.
(b) The waiter cheered finding a flash of daring in Mukesh when he says, “I want to be a motor mechanic”.
(c) Mukesh wants to be a motor mechanic for which he is ready to take any pain as the garage is a long way from his home.
(d) The writer asked, “Do you also dream of flyingn plane” because she wanted to check Mukesh’s dedication and real desire,

Indigo Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Indigo Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Here we are providing Indigo Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo, Extra Questions for Class 12 English was designed by subject expert teachers. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-12-english/

Indigo Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Indigo Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

Indigo Class 12 Questions And Answers Question 1.
How did Rajkumar Shukla establish that he was resolute?
Answer:
Rajkumar Shukla was a peasant from Champaran. He wanted Gandhiji to come with him to accompany him to Champaran. At that time Gandhiji was very busy. But Shukla accompanied Gandhiji everywhere. Therefore, he had been described as resolute.

Indigo Questions And Answers Question 2.
How was Gandhiji treated at Rajendra Prasad’s house?
Answer:
The servants at Rajendra Prasad knew Shukla as a peasant who pestered their master to help the indigo sharecroppers. But they thought that Gandhiji belonged to some low caste. Therefore they didn’t allow him to draw water from the well.

Indigo Short Question Answer Question 3.
What were the terms of the indigo contract between the British landlords and the Indian peasants?
Answer:
The landlords compelled all tenahts to plant three twentieths or 15 per cent of their holdings with indigo and surrender the entire indigo harvest as rent. This was done by a long-term contract.

Indigo Extract Based Questions Question 4.
What did the landlords do when they know that Germany had developed synthetic indigo?
Answer:
The landlords came to know that Germany had developed synthetic indigo. Now producing natural indigo was not profitable for them. But very cunningly they hid that fact from the peasants. They instead obtained agreements from the sharecroppers to pay ‘ them compensation for being released from the 15 per cent arrangement.

Indigo Extra Question Answer Question 5.
Why did many sharecroppers sign the agreement letters willingly? What did the others do who had not signed the letters?
Answer:
The sharecropping system was irksome to the peas-ants. They signed the agreement letters willingly. Those who resisted engaged lawyers; the landlords hired thugs.

Indigo Important Questions And Answers Pdf Question 6.
Why did Gandhiji meet Secretary of the British landlord’s association? How was he treated by him?
Answer:
Gandhiji arrived Chamaparan to get the facts. Therefore he visited the Secretary of the British landlord’s association. The secretary told him that they could give no information to an outsider.

Indigo Class 12 Extra Questions Question 7.
Why did Gandhiji go to Muzzafarapur? Where did he stay there?
Answer:
Muzzafarpur was enroute to Champaran. To obtain more information about sharecropping system he went there. He decided to stay at Professor Malkani’s house. He was a teacher in a government school.

Indigo Question Answers Question 8.
Why did Gandhiji chide the lawyers of Muzza-farpur?
Answer:
Gandhiji chided the lawyers for collecting big fee from the peasants. He said that he had come to the conclusion that they should stop going to courts. Taking such cases to the courts did little good. Where the peasants were so crushed and fear-stricken, law courts were useless. The real relief for them was to be free from fear.

Indigo Extra Questions Question 9.
How did the peasants of Champaran react when they came to know about the arrival of Gandhiji?
Answer:
The news of Gandhiji’s advent and of the nature of his mission spread quickly through Muzzafarpur and to Champaran. Sharecroppers from Champaran began arriving on foot and by conveyance to see their champion.

Indigo Chapter Class 12 Questions And Answers Question 10.
Why did Gandhiji feel that taking the Champaran case to the court was useless?
Answer:
Gandhiji felt that taking the Champaran case to the court was useless. Where the peasants were so crushed and fear-stricken, law courts were useless. The real relief for them was to be free from fear.

Indigo Important Questions Question 11.
How did Champaran peasants react when they came to know that a Mahatma had come to help them?
Answer:
When the Champaran peasants came to know that a Mahatma had come to help them and he was in trouble with the authorities they came in large numbers to Motihari. Thousands of them hold demon¬strations around the courthouse. The officials felt themselves helpless.

Indigo Class 12 Extra Questions And Answers Question 12.
What made the lieutenant-governor drop the case against Gandhiji?
Answer:
Thousands of peasants came in support of Gandhiji. The authorities felt that they could not control them and the condition of law and order could deteriorate. The pressure of the peasants was increasing. On the other hand, Gandhiji refuse to have any bail. Therefore the lieutenant-general dropped the case against Gandhiji.

Class 12 English Indigo Extra Questions And Answers Question 13.
Why did Gandhiji tell the court that he was involved in a ‘conflict of duties’?
Answer:
Gandhiji said in the court he was involved in ‘conflict of duties’. On the one hand, he didn’t want to set a bad example as a lawbreaker; on the other hand, he wanted to render humanitarian and national service for which he had come to Champaran.

Indigo Important Questions And Answers Question 14.
How was civil disobedience won for the first time in India?
Answer:
The judge said that he could not deliver his judgement for several days because of the overwhelming support to Gandhiji. However, he was allowed to remain at liberty. Several days later, Gandhiji received a written communication from the magistrate informing him that the Lieutenant-General had decided to drop the case against him. In this way the civil disobedience won for the first time in India.

Indigo Class 12 Short Questions And Answers Question 15.
How much did the planters ready to refund to the peasants? How did Gandhiji react to it?
Answer:
The planters wanted to prolong the dispute in some way. Therefore, they offered to refund only 25 per cent of the money they extracted illegally from the peasants. Gandhiji at once agreed to it thus breaking the deadlock.

Indigo Class 12 Important Questions Question 16.
Why did Gandhiji agree for only 25 per cent refund?
Answer:
Gandhiji knew that the planters wanted to prolong the dispute in some way or the other. But he proved too smart for them. He at once agreed to their offer of 25 per cent refund. In this way the planters had to part with some of their money and also their prestige.

Indigo Chapter Question Answer Question 17.
What social work did Gandhiji do in the villages of Champaran?
Answer:
Gandhiji opened primary schools there. Many of his disciples came to volunteer their services. Health condition of the place was miserable. Gandhiji got a doctor to volunteer his services for six months.

Indigo Lesson Short Questions And Answers Question 18.
Why was Gandhiji against taking the help of Charles Freer Andrews?
Answer:
Charles Freer Andrews became Gandhiji’s disciple at Champaran. The lawyers thought that it would be good for them if they had an Englishman with them. But Gandhiji was deadly against it. He said taking help of an Englishman would show the weakness of their heart.

Indigo Extra Questions And Answers Question 19.
Why is Rajkumar Shukla described as being ‘resolute’?
Answer:
Rajkumar Shukla was a peasant from Champaran. He wanted Gandhiji to come with him to accompany him to Champaran. At that time Gandhiji was very busy. But Shukla accompanied Gandhiji everywhere. Therefore, he had been described as resolute.

Extra Questions Of Indigo Class 12 Question 20.
Why do you think that the servants thought Gandhiji to be another peasant?
Answer:
Gandhiji wore very simple clothes. His complexion was dark and he was thin. In this way, his appear-ance matched a peasant of that days. Therefore, the servants thought Gandhiji to be another peasant.

Extract Questions From Indigo Class 12 Question 21.
List the places that Gandhiji visited between his first meeting with Shukla and his arrival at Champaran.
Answer:
First of all Gandhiji went to Patna at Rajendra Prasad’s house. From there he went to Muzzafarpur to obtain more information about the sharecropping system. There he stayed at Professor Malkani’s house and from there he went to Champaran.

Indigo Short Questions And Answers Question 22.
What did the peasants pay the British land¬lords as rent? What did the British now want instead and why? What would be the impact of synthetic indigo on the prices of natural indigo?
Answer:
The peasants worked on large estates owned by the British planters. The landlords compelled all the peasants to crop three twentieths or 15 per cent of their holdings with indigo and surrender the entire indigo harvest as rent. The planters came to know that the Germany had developed synthetic indigo.

Producing natural indigo was not profitable. The price of the synthetic indigo would be much less than the natural indigo. But they hid this information from the share¬croppers. Instead they demanded compensation from the peasants to release them from this system.

Question 23.
The events in this part of the text illustrate Gandhiji’s method of working. Can you identify some instances of his method and link them to his ideas of satayagraha and non-violence?
Answer:
Gandhiji believed in the path of truth and non-vio-lence. He did nothing that is morally wrong. He fol- . lowed the path of non-violence against the British. Gandhiji’s path was the path of satayagraha, it means protest for truth by adopting non-violent methods. One of the biggest examples of it is the Dandi March.

Question 24.
Why did Gandhiji agree to a settlement of 25 per cent refund to the farmers?
Answer:
The British planters Wanted some excuse to prolong the dispute between them and the sharecroppers. They offered only 25 per cent refund. They thought that perhaps Gandhiji would ask for full refund. But Gandhiji agree to their offer and broke the dead lock. For him the amount of refund was not important. The landlords had been obliged to part with some of their money and also prestige. Before that they thought themselves above law. As a result, the planters abandoned their estates, which were reverted to the peasants.

Question 25.
How did the episode change the plight of the peasants?
Answer:
The episode of Chamapran had a great effect on the peasants. They saw they had rights and defenders. They learned courage. Also, the British planters abandoned their estates, which were reverted to the peasants.

Question 26.
Why do you think Gandhi considered the Champaran episode to be a turning-point in his life?
Answer:
The episode of Champaran proved that the Indians couldn’t be harassed in their own country. It gave courage to the normal Indians against the dreaded power of the British. Gandhiji thought that it to be a small problem. But due to this incident he decided to urge the departure of the British. It was here where the civil disobedience was first time succeeded. In this way the episode of Champaran proved to be a turning point in Gandhiji’s life.

Question 27.
What was the attitude of the average Indian 1 in smaller localities towards advocates of ‘home rule’?
Answer:
In smaller localities the people were afraid to show sympathy for advocates of home rule. They were so crushed and frightened by the dreaded power of the British that it was impossible for them to support even the idea of home rule.

Question 28.
How do we know that ordinary people too con-tributed to the freedom movement?
Answer:
In the given text it was only due to the support of ordinary people that the sharecroppers of Champaran could get justice. When Gandhiji was arrested in Motihari, the ordinary people flocked on the roads in large numbers, as a result, the government had to drop the case against Gandhiji. This Champaran episode was just a glimpse of the freedom movement. Thus, from this episode, we can gauge the role of ordinary people in the freedom movement.

Indigo Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Who was Rajkumar Shukla? What did he want from Gandhiji?
Answer:
Rajkumar Shukla was a peasant from Champaran. He visited Gandhiji in 1942 at his ashram in Sevagram, in Central India. He wanted that Gandhiji should accompany him to his village in Champaran district. He described to Gandhiji about himself and his district. He told Gandhiji the peasants of Champaran were sharecroppers. Rajkumar Shukla was illiterate but resolute.

He had came to the Congress session to complain about the injustice of the landlord system in Bihar, and somebody told him to speak to Gandhiji. At that time, Gandhiji was very busy. Shukla accompanied him everywhere in India. For weeks he never left Gandhiji’s side.

Impressed by the sharecropper’s tenacity and story Gandhiji said, “I have to be in Calcutta on such-and-such a date. Come and meet me and take me from there.” Shukla reached at the appointed spot in Calcutta when Gandhiji arrived. He waited till Gandhiji was free. Then Gandhiji went with him to Patna by train.

Question 2.
What information did Gandhiji get about the sharecropping system in Champaran?
Answer:
The chief commercial crop of Champaran was indigo. The British landlords compelled all the ten-ants to plant 15% of their holdings with indigo and surrender the entire indigo harvest as rent. This was done by a long-term contract. Then the land-lords came to know that the Germany had developed synthetic indigo. Now producing natural indigo was not at all profitable. Very cunningly the British landlords obtained agreements from the sharecroppers to pay them compensation for being released

from the 15% agreement. Many sharecroppers signed it willingly while the others engaged lawyers. The landlords hired thugs. Meanwhile, the information about synthetic indigo reached the illiterate peasants. Who had paid the compensation wanted their money back.

Question 3.
Describe Gandhiji’s visit at Muzzafarpur.
Answer:
Gandhiji decided to go to Muzzafarpur, which was en route to Champaran. He wanted to obtain more information about the conditions there. He stayed for two days in the home of Professor Malkani who was a teacher in a government school. It was not an ordinary thing those days for a government professor to harbour a man like him. In smaller localities, the Indians were afraid to show sympathy for the advocates of home-rule. The news of the advent of Gandhiji spread quickly to Champaran and Muzzafarpur. Sharecroppers in large number came to see their champion.

Gandhiji talked to the lawyers about the court cases of the sharecroppers. They brief him about the cases and also reported him about the size of their fees. Gandhiji chided the lawyers for collecting big fee from the sharecroppers. He said that it was useless to go to the courts when the peasants were so crushed and fear-stricken.

Question 4.
Describe the incident related to Motihari.
Or
How can you say that the civil disobedience was succeeded first time in modern India?
Answer:
Gandhiji visited British official commissioner of Trihut division. He tried to bully Gandhiji and ordered him to leave Trihut. Gandhiji proceeded to Motihari, the capital of Champaran. A large number of people greeted him at the railway station. A report came that a peasant had been maltreated in a nearby village. Gandhiji decided to go there. Gandhji was a given a notice to leave Champaran immediately. Gandhiji signed the receipt and wrote on it that he would disobey the order.

As a result Gandhiji was ordered to present in the court the next day. The next morning a lot of peasants had gathered in the town of Motihari to support Gandhiji. The officials had to seek Gandhiji’s help to control the crowd. However they got the clear message that the Indians couldn’t be ordered in their own country. The government was baffled. They wanted to postpone the trial.

Gandhiji protested against it. He told the court that he was not a lawbreaker, but he had duties towards his countrymen. In the end the judge said he would not deliver any judgement for several days. Gandhiji was allowed to remain at liberty. After a few days the case against him was dropped. The civil disobedience was suc¬ceeded first time in modern India.

Question 5.
Why is the Champaran episode considered to be the beginning of the Indian struggle for Independence?
Answer:
Gandhiji thought that the problem of the sharecroppers could be solved within a few days. But he stayed there for months. The landlords were compelled to refund some of the money they extracted from the peasants illegally and also they had to part with their prestige. Eventually they abandoned their estates which were reverted to the peasants.

The peasants came to know that they had rights and the defender of their rights. Before that the planters had behaved as lords above the law. The government was compelled to bow before Gandhiji and the case against him was dropped. The civil disobedience was succeeded for the first time in India. Therefore the Champaran episode is considered as the beginning of the Indian struggle for Independence.

Question 6.
Gandhiji’s loyality was not a loyalty to abstractions; it was loyalty to living human beings. Why did Gandhiji continue his stay in Champaran even after indigo sharecropping disappeared?
Answer:
Gandhiji was able to win the battle of Champaran for the poor sharecroppers. They got their land back from the British landlords. But Gandhiji continued his stay there. Gandhiji saw the cultural and social backwardness in the Champaran villages and wanted to do something about it. Many of his disciples joined him in this noble cause. His youngest son and his wife also arrived there from the ashram. Primary schools were opened in six villages.

Kasturbai taught the ashram rules on personal cleanliness and community sanitation.Health conditions were miserable. Gandhiji got a doctor volunteer. He offered his services for six months. Three medicines were available castor oil, quinine and sulphur ointment. Anybody who showed a coated tongue was given a dose of castor oil; anybody with malaria fever received quinine and castor oil; anybody with skin eruptions received ointment with castor oil.

Gandhiji’s loyalty was not a loyalty to abstractions; it was a loyalty towards human beings. His politics was intertwined with the practical day-to-day problems of the millions.

Question 7.
The Champaran episode was a turning point in Gandhiji’s life. Elucidate.
Answer:
Gandhiji considered the Champaran episode a turning point in his life. His revolutionary vision inspired many people. The episode was linked with day to day problems of the poor peasants of Champaran. They were compelled by the British landlords to crop Indigo in 15% of their total holdings and surrender the whole harvest as rent. When they discovered that synthetic Indigo had been developed by Germany, they no longer needed the harvest of the peasants. But they hid this fact from the peasants.

Instead they demanded compensation from the poor peasants to release them from the 15% agreement. Some signed willingly, while others engaged lawyers. The landlords hired thugs. Gandhiji helped the poor peasants by protesting and civil disobedience. At last, he was successful in freeing the peasants from the exploitation. Many other movements took place after t that. It also meant the victory of civil disobedience for the first time in India.

Question 8.
Why was Gandhiji against taking help from Charles Freer Andrews? What values of life are conveyed by this?
Answer:
Early in the Champaran action, Charles Freer Andrews, the English pacifist became Gandhiji’s devoted follower. He came to bid Gandhiji farewell before leaving for his duty to the Fiji Islands. Gandhiji’s lawyer friends thought it would be a good idea for Andrews to stay at Champaran and help them. Andrews was willing if Gandhiji agreed.

But Gandhiji strongly opposed it. He said to have Mr. Andrews on their side only because he happened to be an Englishman is wrong. It would show only the weakness of their spirit. They were fighting for a just cause and they should believe in their strength. This incident showed that self-reliance and self-help are most important to achieve any goal.

Question 9.
How was Gandhi able to influence lawyers? Give instances.
Answer:
Gandhiji was able to influence the lawyers in several ways. First he came to know about the size of fee they collected from the peasants to fight their cases in court. He chided them for that. He told them that taking such cases to courts were not good when the peasants were so crushed and fear-stricken. When it was feared that Gandhiji might be put to prison they consulted among themselves.

They realised that if Gandhiji who was totally stranger, and yet ready to go to prison for the sake of peasants; it would be shameful for them to go homes since they were not only the residents of the adjoining districts but also had claimed to help the peasants. Therefore they decided to follow Gandhiji in jail in pairs. In Champaran an Englishman, Charles Freer Andrews became Gandhiji’s disciple.

The lawyers throught that it would be of great help to them if Andrews supported them. But Gandhiji told that it would show only the weakness of their soul to seek help of Mr Andrews only because he happened to be an Englishman. They should learn to be self-reliant.

Question 10.
“Freedom from fear is more important than legal justice for the poor”. Do you think that the poor of India are free from fear after Independence?
Answer:
The episode of Champaran represents the exploitation of the poor Indian peasants by the British planters. At that time India was under British rule. But even after seventy years of Independence there is Champaran everywhere in India. The poor are still exploited by the bureaucrats, moneylenders and politicians. The moneylenders charge unimaginably high rates of interest from the farmers.

No wonder the incidents of suicides by the farmers are on the rise. Our constitution has given equal rights to all Indians. But in fact the poor can’t enjoy any of the rights given to them by the constitution. They are remembered only at the time of elections. Though they had got political freedom yet this freedom is shameful.

Indigo Extra Questions and Answers Extract Based

Read, the following paragraph and answer the questions that follow:

(Para-1)

Under an ancient arrangement, the Champaran peas-ants were sharecroppers. Rajkumar Shukla was one of them. He was illiterate but resolute. He has come to the Congress session to complain about the injustice of the landlord system in Bihar, and somebody had probably said, “Speak to Gandhi.”

Questions :
(a) What was an ancient arrangement ?
(b) Who was Rajkumar Shukla ?
(c) Why Rajkumar Shukla had come to Congress session ?
(d) What, somebody had said to Rajkumar Shukla ?
Answers:
(a) An ancient arrangement was sharecropping. The Champaran peasants were share croppers.
(b) Rajkumar Shukla was an illiterate but resolute peasant from Champaran, Bihar.
(c) Rajkumar Shukla had come to Congress session to complain about the injustice of the landlord system in Bihar.
(d) Somebody had said to Rajkumar Shukla, “Speak to Gandhi.”

(Para-2)

The news of Gandhi’s advent and of the nature of his mission spread quickly through Muzzafarpur and to Champaran. Sharecroppers from Champaran began arriv-ing on foot and by conveyance to see their Champion. Muzzafarpur lawyers called on Gandhi to brief him; they frequently represented peasant groups in court; they told him about their cases and reported the size of their fee.

Questions :
(a) What was the news at Muzzafarpur ?
(b) How and why did the sharecroppers reach from Champaran ?
(c) What was the role of Muzzafarpur’s lawyers ?
(d) Name the chapter and the writer.
Answers:
(a) The news of Gandhi’s advent and of the nature of his mission was the news at Muzzafarpur.
(b) Sharecroppers from Champaran reached on foot and by Conveyance to see their Champion.
(c) Muzzafarpur’s lawyers were frequently representating peasant groups in court.
(d) ‘Indigo’ is the chapter written by ‘Louis Fischer’.

(Para-3)

A report came in that a peasant had been maltreated in a nearby village. Gandhi decided to go and see; the next morning he started out on the back of an elephant. He had not proceeded far when the police supritendent’s messanger overtook him and ordered him to return to town in his carriage. Gandhi complied. The messenger drove Gandhi home where he served him with an official notice to quit Champaran immediately. Gandhi signed a receipt for the notice and wrote on it that he would disobey the order.
The consequence, Gandhi received a summons of appear in court the next day.

Questions :
(a) What report came and what did Gandhi decide ?
(b) What happened when Gandhi was on the way to the nearby village ?
(c) What did the messenger do with Gandhi ?
(d) What was Gandhi’s reaction to the notice and what consequence had he to face ?
Answers:
(a) A report came in that a peasant had been maltreated in a nearby village. Gandhi decided to go and see.
(b) When Gandhi was on the way to the nearby village, the police supertendent’s messenger overtook him and ordered him to return to town in his carriage.
(c) The messenger served Gandhi with an official notice to quit Champaran immediately.
(d) Gandhi signed a receipt for the notice and wrote on it that he would disobey the order. In consequence, Gandhi received a summons to appear in court the next day.

(Para-4)

What about the injustice to the sharecroppers, Gandhi demanded. The lawyers withdrew to consult. Rajendra Prasad has recorded the upshot of their consultations : “They thought, amongst themselves, that Gandhi was totally a stranger, and yet he was prepared to go to prision for the sake of the peasants : If they, on the other hand, being not only residents of the adjoining districts but also those who claimed to have served these peasants, should go home, it would be shameful desertion.”

Questions :
(a) What did Gandhi demand to the lawyers ?
(b) What was the reaction of the lawyers ?
(c) What was the conclusion of their consultations ?
(d) What would be- shameful desertion ?
Answers:
(a) Ghandi demanded the lawyers about the injustice to the sharecroppers.
(b) The lawyers withdrew to consult.
(c) According to their consultations : they, if would go home being local residents, would surely be shameful and a defeat to them in that war of injustice.
(d) If they should go home, claiming to have served those peasants, it would be shameful desertion.

(Para-5)

They thought he would demand repayment in full of the money which they had illegally and deceitfully extorted from the sharecroppers. He asked only 50 per cent. “There he seemed adamant,” writes Reverend J.Z. Hodge, a British missionary in Champaran who observed the entire episode at close range. “Thinking probably that he would not give way, the representative of the planters offered to refund to the extent of 25 per cent, and to his amazement Mr. Gandhi took him at his word, thus breaking the deadlock.”

Questions :
(a) What landlords had done with the sharecroppers ?
(b) Who was Reverend J. Z. Hodge ?
(c) What did the representative of the planters offer to refund ?
(d) How did Mr. Gandhi break the deadlock ?
Answers:
(a) Landlords had illegally and deceitfully extorted money from the sharecroppers.
(b) Reverend J. Z. Hodge was a British missionary in Champaran who observed the entire episode at close range.
(c) Representative of the planters offered to refund to the extent of 25 per cent only.
(d) Mr. Gandhi broke the deadlock by getting agree to the offer of 25 per cent refund by British planters.

(Para-6)

Gandhi never contented himself with large political or economic solutions. He saw the cultural and social backwardness in the Champaran villages and wanted to do something about it immediately. He appealed for teachers. Mahadev Desai and Narhari Parikh, two young men who had just joined Gandhi as disciples, and their wives, volunteered for the work. Several more came from Bombay, Poona and other distant parts of the land. Devdas, Gandhi’s youngest son, arrived from the ashram and so did Mrs. Gandhi. Primary schools were opened in six villages. Kasturbai taught the ashram rules on personal cleanliness and community sanitation.

Questions :
(a) What did Gandhi observe in the Champaran villages ?
(b) Whom did Gandhi appeal and why ?
(c) From Gandhi’s family, who came to Champaran ?
(d) What did Kasturbai do to the people of Champaran ?
Answers:
(a) Gandhi, in Champaran villages observed the cultural and social backwardness and wanted to do something immediately
(b) Gandhi appealed Mahadev Desal and Narhari Parikh, two young teachers, to volunteer for the work.
(c) Devdas, Gandhi’s youngest son and Mrs. Gandhi Casturbai came to Champaran.
(d) Kasturbal, Gandhi’s wife taught the ashram rules on personal cleanliness and community sanitation to the people of Champaran.

A Roadside Stand Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

A Roadside Stand Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Here we are providing A Roadside Stand Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo, Extra Questions for Class 12 English was designed by subject expert teachers. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-12-english/

A Roadside Stand Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

A Roadside Stand Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

A Roadside Stand Questions Answers Class 12  Question 1.
The city folk who drove through the countryside hardly paid any heed to the roadside stand or to the people who ran it. If at all they did, it was to complain, which lines bring this out? What was their complaint about?
Answer:
Lines which bring this are :
“The polished traffic passed with a mind ahead, or if ever aside a moment, then out of sorts; At having the landscape marred with the artless paint; Of signs that with N turned wrong and sturned wrong…” Their complaint was that the wrongly made signs had spoiled the natural beauty.

A Roadside Stand Question Answer Class 12 Question 2.
What was the plea of the folk who had put up the roadside stand?
Answer:
The plea of roadside stand sellers was the ignorance by the vehicles.They pleaed that nobody stopped there to buy their products.

A Roadside Stand Questions And Answers Pdf Class 12 Question 3.
The government and other social service agencies appear to help the poor rural people, but actually do them no good. Pick out the words and phrases that the poet uses to show their double standards.
Answer:
The words/phrases expressing their double standards are :

  • pitiful kin
  • mercifully gathered
  • they won’t have to think for themselves anymore.

A Roadside Stand Extra Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 4.
What is the ‘Childish longing’ that the poet refers to? Why is it vain?
Answer:
‘Childish longing’ seems through the desire of the poor farmer who sits near the open window all day and prays for the stopping of any car.

A Roadside Stand Poem Question Answer Class 12 Question 5.
Which lines tell us about the insufferable pain that the poet feels at the throught of the plight of the rural people?
Answer:
The lines about the insufferable pain that the poet feels are :
“Sometimes I feel myself I can hardly bear the thought of so much Childish longing in vain, the sadness that lurks near the open window there.” “I can’t help owning the great relief it would be to put these people at one stroke out of their pain.”

A Roadside Stand Stanza Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 6.
Where was a little new shed situated ?
Answer:
Out of the little old house in front at the edge of the road, was the place where ‘a little new shed’ was situated.

A Roadside Stand Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 7.
What is the demand of the roadside stand ?
Answer:
The roadside stand pleaded not for a dole of bread but demands for some of the money, some cash which supports cities from sinking and withering faint.

Roadside Stand Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 8.
What attitude does the polished traffic show ?
Answer:
The polished traffic passes with a mind ahead and does of pay little bit attention towards the roadside stands.

Roadside Stand Question Answers Class 12 Question 9.
What is sold by the roadside stand sellers ?
Answer:
They sell wild berries in wooden quarts and crook necked golden squash with silver warts.

The Roadside Stand Questions Answers Class 12 Question 10.
What is the complaint of the poet ?
Answer:
The complaint of the poet is about the city’s money which he also wants to feel in hand and to expand their life’s standard.

A Roadside Stand Solutions Class 12 Question 11.
What is in the news ?
Answer:
The news is about the settlement of the farmers mercifully near to the theatre and the store where they won’t have to think for themselves any-more.

A Roadside Stand Question Answers Class 12 Question 12.
What is the Childish longing of the poet ?
Answer:
The poet childishly longs for the betterment and growth of those unfortunate people but these desires and expectations would never be fulfilled by the greedy good-doers.

The Roadside Stand Question Answer Class 12 Question 13.
Why those cars are named as ‘selfish’ ?
Answer:
Cars (vehicles) continuously pass through that road but out of those thousand of cars, not a single stop there even to inquire about the prices of the products of the farmers.

A Roadside Stand Important Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 14.
Why do the cars stop there occasionally?
Answer:
Cars stop at roadside stand occasionally to ask about the route’s destination or for demanding the fuel (gas) for their vehicles.

A Roadside Stand Ncert Solutions Class 12 Question 15.
How does the poet feel himself helpless?
Answer:
The poet finally concludes that he is totally helpless to remove the pain of the farmers. He can’t put those people out of their pain at one stroke.

A Roadside Stand Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Write in brief the summary of the poem.
Answer:
Poet, Robert Frost experienced the pain of the poor formers who established their little shedded stalls to sell various products grown or manufactured by them but the poet observed that out of thousands of the visitors and vehicles, nobody is interested in their offerings. On the other hand, the selfish travellers criticized their presentations and passed throughly proudly.

Poet is hurt by their behaviour and attitude and has a complaint for their survival as they too want to be the part of the flow of economy; presently mainly run by the city dwellers only. They too have the right to live comfortably like their ideals. But they are always used for the self motives of the greedy good-doers. They enforce their benefits over the poor farmers, misguide them and destroy their ancient

culture and way of living by lullying them. They just want to grasp their fields and houses. Poet is tired and finds his expectations failed, too much disappointed by the financial condition and struggle V of the distressed peasants who for whole day sit, pray and wait for the cars to stop at least to inquire or to buy but the self-centred egoistic persons use the empty place to turn their vehicles or sometimes stop to ask about the path or fuel.

Anger of farmers is natural, they reply and ask’ irritatingly for the common sense of the proudy persons. Poet realizes that no miracle can be seen and he is unable to console the poverty-stricken farmers and it’s impossible to extricate the villagers out of their pain at one stroke. He realizes, when finds himself sensible, that his call is futile, to help them and no one is ready to help them.

Question 2.
Have you ever stopped at a roadside stand ? What have you observed ?
Answer:
Yes, I’ve stopped at a roadside stand on a highway twice or thrice and found that the villagers have too much expectations from us, who pass from those roads. They work hard for whole day and whole family members of them sit there to sell fresh vegetables, fruits, juices and other products.

Very few of us actually purchase something but only use them for general queries like asking about road map, gas or petrol for our vehicles or many a times to use that broad empty space to turn our vehicles. I also observed that those farmers are pitiful and facing very miserable condition and fighting for their existence and survival.

Those merciful poor farmers should be helped and treated like the human beings and dwellers of cities. They should not be cheated and used for the introversion purposes. They also contribute to the growth and economy of the country as they grow crops for whole mankind.

A Roadside Stand Extra Questions and Answers Stanza For Comprehension

Stanza 1

The little old house was out with a little new shed
In front at the edge of the road where the traffic sped,
A roadside stand that too pathetically pled,
It would not be fair to say for a dole of bread,
But for some of the money, the cash, whose flow supports
The flower of cities from sinking and withering faint.

Questions

(a) Why was the new shed put up by the villagers ?
(b) Why the word ‘pathetically1 was used ?
(c) What would not be fair and why ?
(d) How cash supports the cities ?
Answers
(a) The new shed was put up by the villagers to earn some money by selling their products.
(b) Word ‘pathetically’ was used to show the miserable and pitiful condition of the farmers.
(c) To say for a ‘dole of bread’ would not be fair because those farmers have their self-respect and they do not need begging.
(d) Cash escapes the cities from sinking and withering faint.

Stanza 2

The polished traffic passed with a mind ahead,
Or if ever aside a moment, then out of sorts
At having the landscape marred with the artless paint
Of signs that with N turned wrong and sturned wrong
Offered for sale wild berries in wooden quarts,
Or crook-necked golden squash with silver warts,
Or beauty rest in a beautiful mountain scene,

Questions
(a) What does ‘the polished traffic’ mean ?
(b) How the landscape was marred ?
(c) What was sold there at roadside stands ?
(d) What is meant by ‘out of sorts’ ?
Answers
(a) The polished traffic means the glossy, dexterous and proudy traffic.
(b) The landscape was marred with the artless paint of signs that with N turned wrong and S turned wrong.
(c) Wild berries in wooden quarts and crook-necked golden squash with silver warts are sold there.
(d) ‘Out of sorts’ means complaining, bad-tempered or unhappy.

Stanza 3

You have the money, but if you want to be mean,
Why keep your money (his crossly) and go along.
The hurt to the scenery wouldn’t be my complaint
So much as the trusting sorrow of what is unsaid :
Here far from the city we make our roadside stand
And ask for some city money to feel in hand
To try if it will not make our being expand,
And give us the life of the moving-pictures’ promise
That the party in power is said to be keeping from us.

Questions
(a) How are the city dwellers proved to be mean ?
(b) Where have they made their roadside stands ?
(c) Why do the farmers need some city money to feel in hand ?
(d) What is the promise of the ruling party ?
Answers
(a) City dwellers have enough money but they go along without spending it.
(b) ‘They have made their roadside stands far from the city.
(c) The farmers need some city money to feel in hand to make their being expand and to live life like their ideals/heroes.
(d) The party in power promises to give them a comfortable and luxury life without worry and economic problem.

Stanza 4

It is in the news that all these pitiful kin
Are to be bought out and mercifully gathered in
To live in villages, next to the theatre and the store,
Where they won’t have to think for themselves any more,
While greedy good-doers, beneficent beasts of prey,
Swarm over their lives enforcing benefits
That are calculated to soothe them out of their wits,
And by teaching them how to sleep they sleep all day,
Destroy their sleeping at night the ancient way.

Questions
(a) What is in the news?
(b) What, according to the greedy good-doers, is the benefit of the farmers?
(c) ‘Swarm over their lives enforcing benefits’, explain.
(d) How their sleeping would be destroyed?
Answers
(a) It is in the news that all these pitiful kin are to be brought out and gathered mercifully, these farmers would be settled in the villages near the theatre and the store.
(b) The farmers won’t have to think for themselves any-more.
(c) Aborie mentioned line means : Capturing the lives of the farmers by enforcing their own benefits; using them for purposes.
(d) By teaching them how to sleep, their ancient way of sleeping would be destroyed.

Stanza 5

Sometimes I feel myself I can hardly bear
The thought of so much childish longing in vain,
The sadness that lurks near the open window there,
That waits all day in almost open prayer
For the squeal of brakes, the sound of a stopping car,
Of all the thousand selfish cars that pass,
Just one to inquire what a farmer’s prices are.
And one did stop, but only to plow up grass
In using the yard to back and turn around;
And another to ask the way to where it was bound;
And another to ask could they sell it a gallon of gas
They couldn’t (this crossly); thy had none, didn’t it seel

Questions
(a) What can be hardly borne by the poet?
(b) What do they wait for?
(c) How cars are selfish?
(d) What is the reply of the farmers at last?
Answers
(a) The poet can hardly bear the thought of so much childish longing in vain: expectations that would never be fulfilled.
(b) They (farmers) wait for the squeal Of brakes, the sound of a stopping car; actually they wait for the real customers.
(c) Cars are said to be selfish because nobody stops there to buy anything but to inquire only or to plow up the grass by turning their heavy vehicles.
(d) The farmers angrily reply that they have nothing as per their demand, do they not see whatever they are selling.

Stanza 6

No, in country money, the country scale of gain,
The requisite lift of spirit has never been found,
Or so the voice of the country seems to complain,
I can’t help owning the great relief it would be
To put these people at one stroke out of their pain.
And then next day as I come back into the sane,
I wondor how I should like you to come to me
And offer to put me gently out of my pain.

Questions
(a) What is not found in country money?
(b) Who complains and why?
(c) How poet finds himself helpless?
(d) Why was poet wondeored?
Answers
(a) The requisite lift of spirit is never found in country money, at the country scale of gain.
(b) The voice (villagers) of the country complains because no relief is given to them from the government or greedy good-doers.
(c) The poet finds himself helpless as he is unable to put those people out of their pain at one stroke.
(d) The poet was wondeored because he was expecting them to come to him and put him gently out of his pain.

 

An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Here we are providing An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo, Extra Questions for Class 12 English was designed by subject expert teachers. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-12-english/

An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

An Elementary School Classroom In A Slum Questions And Answers Question 1.
What do you think is the colour of ‘sour cream’? Why do you think the poet has used this expression to describe the classroom walls ?
Answer:
The poet says that the colour of the walls is of‘sour cream’. The poet wants to convey the idea that the children living in the slum has no happiness in their life. It has become sour and the cream colour represents paleness. The children have no vitality in their lives, thus they have become pale due to malnutrition.

An Elementary School Classroom In A Slum Extra Questions And Answers Question 2.
The walls of the classroom are decorated with the pictures of ‘Shakespeare’, ‘buildings with domes’, ‘world maps’ and beautiful valleys. How do these contrast with the world of these children ?
Answer:
The world of the children living in slum is totally different from the pictures of Shakespeare, maps beautiful valleys and big buildings. Their world is confined to the slum in which they are living. The open joyful world is accessible to them.

Elementary School Classroom In A Slum Questions Question 3.
What does the poet want for the children of the slums ? How can their lives be made to change ?
Answer:
The poet wants that the children should be taken out of their slums. Their living conditions should be changed. The poet wants that the children should be shown green fields; they should be allowed to live a free and carefree life. Without any worry, they can concentrate well on their studies.

An Elementary School Classroom In A Slum Questions And Answers Extra Question 4.
What does Stephen Spender want for the children of the school in a slum ?
Answer:
The poet wants that the children should be shown green fields; they should be allowed to live a free and carefree life. Without any worry, they can concentrate well on their studies. The poet says only those people create history who are carefree.

An Elementary School Classroom In A Slum Short Questions And Answers Question 5.
How is ‘Shakespeare wicked and the map a bad example’ for the children of the school in a slum ?
Answer:
The poet says that it will be useless to talk about Shakespeare to the children in the classroom. He even says that Shakespeare is wicked. The big map with all its places, ships and so on tempts the children to steal. These children have to spend their lives in small homes. The poet means to say that for the children their world is only the slums not the big maps.

An Elementary School Classroom In A Slum Important Questions Question 6.
Which words/phrases in the poem ‘An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum’ show that the slum children are suffering from acute malnutrition ?
Answer:
There are many words and phrases in the poem that show the slum children are suffering from malnutrition. These words and phrases are hair torn round their pallor’, ‘tall girl with her weighed-down’ head, ‘the paper seeming boy’ and ‘the stunted heir of twisted bones’.

An Elementary School Classroom In A Slum Question Answer Question 7.
How does the poet describe the classroom walls ?
Answer:
The poet explains the classroom in detail. He says that the walls of the classroom have cream colour. They smell like sour cream. They are decorated with many pictures, maps of the world and the pictures of Shakespeare.

Extra Questions Of Elementary School Classroom In A Slum Question 8.
Whom does the poet appeal to change the life of the children for better ?
Answer:
The poet appeals to the governor, inspector and the visitors to do something for the poor children. The poet wants that the children should be shown green fields; they should be allowed to live a free and carefree life. Without any worry they can concentrate well on their studies. The poet says only those people create history who are carefree.

Elementary School Classroom In A Slum Extra Questions Question 9.
How does the poet describe the walls of the classroom wall ?
Answer:
The poet says that the walls of the classroom are cream. They smell like sour cream. There is a bust of Shakespeare in the classroom. There are pictures of big church and Tyrolese valley having bell-shaped flowers. There is an open-handed map, which shows all the places of the world.

Extra Questions Of An Elementary School Classroom In A Slum Question 10.
Why does the Stephen Spender say that the pictures and maps in the elementary school classroom are not meaningful ?
Answer:
The poet says that there is a bust of Shakespeare in the classroom. There are pictures of a big church and the Tyrolese valley having bell-shaped flowers. There is an open-handed map, which shows all the places of the world. But ironically for the children living in the slum their world is not that map but only the scene that can be seen outside the window of their classroom. Therefore, the pictures and maps on the wall are meaningless.

An Elementary School Classroom In A Slum Extra Questions Question 11.
How does the world depicted on the classroom walls differ from the world of the slum children ?
Answer:
There are many pictures and maps on the walls of the classroom walls. They present a very rosy picture of the world. But ironically the lives of the children living in the slum are very gloomy. They live a very miserable life.

Question Answer Of An Elementary School Classroom In A Slum Question 12.
What message does Stephen Spender convey through the poem ‘An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum’ ?
Answer:
The message conveyed in this poem is that the children living in the slum should be given better facilities. They should be taken out of their slums. Only then they can become useful citizens.

An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Write in brief the summary of the poem.
Answer:
The poet describes some children sitting in an elementary school. This school is situated in a slum. The children sitting here present a very miserable view. Their hair are like weeds and scattered on their pale face. Then the poet describes a tall girl. She is sitting with her head bent. There is a small and thin looking boy. His eyes are like that of a rat’s eyes. Then there is an another boy who has disease of swollen and twisted bones and joints. He has got his disease from his father.

The poet notices a young and sweet boy sitting at the back of the class. He is perhaps dreaming about the squirrel’s game. He is perhaps dreaming of having such tree-room for him¬self also. The poet says that the walls of the classroom are cream. They smell like sour cream. There is a bust of Shakespeare in the classroom. There are pictures of big church and the Tyrolese valley having bell-shaped flowers. There is an open-handed map, which shows all the places of the world. But ironically for the children living in the slum their world is not that map but only the scene that can be seen outside the window of their classroom.

The poet says that it will be useless to talk about Shakespeare to the children in the classroom. He even says that Shakespeare is wicked. The big map with all its places, ships and so on tempts the children to steal. These children have to spend their lives in small homes. Their lives are nothing but an endless night. The children have grown so weak that their bones could be seen from their skin. Many of these wear spectacles, and these spectacles have mended glass.

The poet appeals to the governor, inspector and the visitors to do something for the poor children. The poet wants that the children should be shown green fields; they should be allowed to live a free and carefree life. Without any worry they can concentrate well on their studies. The poet says only those people create history who are carefree.

Question 2.
Write the central idea of the poem in detail.
Answer:
This poem is about the children who are living in a slum. They are mostly suffering from malnutrition. In their classroom, there are many beautiful pictures. There is an open handed map and the bust of . Shakespeare. The poet wants that these children should be taken out of their slum and they should be shown green fields and be allowed to run freely. Therefore, he appeals to the officials to do some thing for the children.

The poet says that only those people can create history who can enjoy anything under the sun. Therefore, the poet wants that these children should also be provided proper facilities so that they can grow into useful citizens.

An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum Extra Questions and Answers Stanza For  Comprehension

Stanza 1

Far far from gusty waves these children’s faces.
Like rootless weeds, the hair torn round their pallor :
The tall girl with her weighed-down head.

Questions
(a) Who are these children ?
(b) Which figure of speech has been used in the first two lines ?
(c) Why is the tall girl’s head weighed-down ?
(d) What does the word ‘pallor’ mean ?
Answers
(a) These children are very poor children who live in a slum and sitting in a school classroom of the slum.
(b) The figure of speech used in the first two lines ‘simile’ A. like rootless weeds.
(c) The tall girl appears to be very sad with the condition of life. She might have many responsibilities. Therefore, her head is weighed-down.
(d) The word ‘pallor’ means the pale faces of the children due to malnutrition.

Stanza 2

At back of the dim class
One unnoted, sweet and young. His eyes live in a dream,
Of squirrel’s game, in tree room, other than this.

Questions
(a) Why is the class dim ?
(b) How is the young child different from others ?
(c) What is he doing ?
(d) What is a tree room ?
Answers
(a) The class is dim because no one takes care of its paint as a result it has become dark and dingy. Possibly, the poet here also wants to indicate the poor class of society and their dark and dim future.
(b) All the other children look gloomy. But the young child is quite different from them. He is full of bright dreams of his future.
(c) He is possibly dreaming about the squirrel’s game in the tree room.
(d) A tree room is a type of hole in the trunk of a tree where the little animals or birds make their homes.

Stanza 3

On sour cream walls, donations.  Shakespeare’s head,
Cloudless at dawn, civilized dome riding all cities.
Belled, flowery, Tyrolese valley. Open-handed map
Awarding the world its world.

Questions
(a) Name the poem and its poet.
(b) What is meant by ‘sour cream walls’ ?
(c) What donations are displayed on the walls ?
(d) Why does the poet call the map ‘open-handed’ ?
Answers
(a) The name of the poem is ‘An Elementary School Class¬room in a Slum’ and the name of the poet is Stephen Spender.
(b) Sour cream walls mean damp and faded walls of the classroom that give foul smell.
(c) There are many things donated by people are displayed
on the walls. They include pictures, map and Shakespeare’s bust. .
(d) The map has been called ‘open-handed’ because all the places of the world are shown in it and it is big.

Stanza 4

And yet, for these
Children, these windows, not this map, their world,
Where all their future’s painted with a fog,
A narrow street sealed in with a lead sky Far far from rivers,
capes, and stars of words.

Questions
(a) Who are the children referred to here ?
(b) Which is their world ?
(c) How is their life different from that of other children ?
(d) Why is the future of these children ‘painted with a fog ?
Answers
(a) The children referred to here are the children living in the slum.
(b) Their world is confined to the slum in which they are living.
(c) The other children of well-to-do families have all basic facilities of life. They are free to go anywhere. But the children living in the slum are confined to their little dark world.
(d) The future of these children is very dark. Therefore the poet calls it ‘painted with a fog’.

Stanza 5

With ships and sun and love tempting them to steal
For lives that slyly turn in their cramped holes
From fog to endless night ?

Questions
(a) Who are ‘them’ referred to in the first line ?
(b) What tempts them ?
(c) What does the poet say about ‘their’ lives ?
(d) What do you understand ‘from fog to endless night’ ?
Answers
(a) The word ‘them’ in these lines referred to the children living in the slum.
(b) The beautiful places shown in the map tempt them.
(c) The poet says that ‘their’ lives are like a life of a mouse. The children are compelled to live in very small rooms as the mice live in holes.
(d) This phrase means that the children living in the slum have a very miserable existence. They have to suffer a lot from dawn till night and would never overcome.

Stanza 6

On their slag heap, these children Wear skins peeped through by bones and spectacles of steel
With mended glass, like bottle bits on stones.
All of their time and space are foggy slum.
So blot their maps with slums as big as doom.

Questions
(a) Name the poem and the poet.
(b) Which two images are used to describe these slums ?
(c) What sort of life do these children lead ?
(d) Which figure of speech is used in the last line ?
Answers
(a) The name of the poem is ‘An Elementary School Class¬room in a Slum’. The name of the poet is Stephen Spender.
(b) The sickly bodies of the children has been compared to a slag heap. Their mended spectacles have been compared to the bottle bits on stones.
(c) These children live a very poor and miserable life.
(d) The poetic device simile is used in the last line – slums as big as doom.

Stanza 7

Unless, governor, inspector, visitor,
This map becomes their window and these windows
That shut upon their lives like catacombs,
Break O break open till they break the town.

Questions
(a) Name the poem and the poet.
Ob) What does the poet want from the governor, inspector and visitors ?
(c) What are ‘these windows’ which the poet talks of ?
(d) ‘That shut upon their lives like catacombs’. Which figure of speech has been used in this line ?
Answers
(a) The name of the poem is ‘An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum’ and the name of the poet is Stephen Spender.
(b) The poet wants that they should come and do something for the betterment of the children living in a slum.
(c) They are the classroom windows from where the children can see the narrow street of their slum.
(d) The figure of speech used here is simile

Class 12 English Important Extra Questions with Answers | English Important Questions Class 12

Class 12 English Important Extra Questions with Answers | English Important Questions Class 12

Class 12 English Important Extra Questions: Here we are providing NCERT Important Extra Questions for Class 12 English Flamingo and Vistas with Answers Pdf Download. Students can get Class 12 English NCERT Solutions, Important Questions of English Class 12 were designed by subject expert teachers.

CBSE NCERT English Class 12 Important Questions with Answers aid students in preparing for their sophomore years start by developing a strong foundation in English subject. This Class 12 English Extra Questions will not only support CBSE Board, UP, MP, Gujarat Board students to score good marks in their internal exams, board exams but also helps to crack the hardest competitive exams like NEET, JEE Main, JEE Advanced, AIIMS, etc. Read on to find out everything regarding CBSE NCERT Extra Questions And Answers for Class 12 English.

English Core Class 12 Important Questions with Answers Pdf Download

Students can check out the Higher Secondary/ 12th Class CBSE NCERT English Important Extra Questions Class 12 subject for all lessons from the quick links provided over here.

Important Questions for Class 12 English Flamingo

Important Questions for Class 12 English Flamingo Prose

  1. The Last Lesson Extra Questions
  2. Lost Spring Extra Questions
  3. Deep Water Extra Questions
  4. The Rattrap Extra Questions
  5. Indigo Extra Questions
  6. Poets and Pancakes Extra Questions
  7. The Interview Extra Questions
  8. Going Places Extra Questions

Important Questions for Class 12 English Flamingo Poetry

  1. My Mother At Sixty-six Extra Questions
  2. An Elementary School Classroom in a Slum Extra Questions
  3. Keeping Quiet Extra Questions
  4. A Thing of Beauty Extra Questions
  5. A Roadside Stand Extra Questions
  6. Aunt Jennifer’s Tigers Extra Questions

Important Questions for Class 12 English Vistas

  1. The Third Level Extra Questions
  2. The Tiger King Extra Questions
  3. Journey to the end of the Earth Extra Questions
  4. The Enemy Extra Questions
  5. Should Wizard hit Mommy Extra Questions
  6. On the face of It Extra Questions
  7. Evans Tries an O-level Extra Questions
  8. Memories of Childhood Extra Questions

We hope the given Chapter Wise Class 12 English Important Extra Questions of Flamingo and Vistas will help you. If you have any queries regarding CBSE English Core Class 12 Important Questions with Answers, drop a comment below and we will get back to you at the earliest.

FAQ’s on Extra Questions for Class 12 English

Question 1.
How to access unit-wise class 12 English extra questions and answers?

Answer:
Just by referring to this page, you all can easily access and collect the unit-wise extra questions for class 12 English for better preparation.

Question 2.
Is there an online portal that provides extra questions for the 12th English board exams?

Answer:
Yes, there are many online portals in this internet world that provide extra questions to prepare effectively and score better marks in the 12th-grade English board exams.

Question 3.
Which is the best website to find the list of class 12 English extra questions?

Answer:
Learninsta.com is the best & trusted website to discover the list of extra questions for 12th class English board exams.

Question 4.
Which question bank is best for the English board exam and includes some extra questions for class 12 English CBSE?

Answer:
Our provided Ncert Solutions for Class 12 English is the best question bank & study material for preparing all the topics included in the 12th English subject. Also, it holds unit-wise extra questions for class 12 English board exams.

The Last Lesson Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

The Last Lesson Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Here we are providing The Last Lesson Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo, Extra Questions for Class 12 English was designed by subject expert teachers. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-12-english/

The Last Lesson Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

The Last Lesson Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

The Last Lesson Extract Based Questions Class 12 Question 1.
Why did Franz not go to school that day?
Answer:
Franz had started very late for school on that day. He had also not learnt the rules for the participles and M.Hamel was going to ask questions on participles. He was dread of M.Hamel’s scolding. Therefore Franz didn’t want to go to school on that day.

The Last Lesson Question Answers Class 12 Question 2.
What sights did Franz see on his way to school?
Answer:
On his way to school, Franz found that the day was warm and bright. The birds were chirping at the edge of woods; and in the open woods, the Prussian soldiers were drilling. When he passed the town hall there was a crowd in front of the bulletin board. Franz wondered what the matter could be. But he didn’t stop to read it.

The Last Lesson Extra Questions Class 12  Question 3.
What tempted Franz to stay away from school?
Answer:
The day was bright and warm. The Prussian soldiers were drilling in the woods. The birds were chirping and M.Hafnel was going to ask questions on participles and Franz had not learnt anything about it. Franz was dreaded of his scolding. All this tempted Franz to stay away from school.

The Last Lesson Important Questions Class 12 Question 4.
What had been put up on the bulletin board?
Answer:
A war was going on between France and Prussia. The French districts of Alsace and Lorraine had fallen into the hands of Prussia. The teaching and studying of French had been banned in these districts. The notice for the same had been put up on the bulletin board.

The Last Lesson Short Question Answer Class 12 Question 5.
What did Franz wonder about when he entered the class that day?
Answer:
On that day there was no noise outside the class. Then he saw that M.Hamel was wearing his beautiful green coat, his frilled shirt and the little black coat. He wore this dress on inspection and prize distribution days. Then he saw the elderly people sitting on the back desks. All these sights wondered Franz.

The Last Lesson Question Answer Class 12 Question 6.
What usual noises could be heard in the street when the school began ? How was the scene in the school in the morning of the last lesson different from that on other days?
Answer:
Usually, when school began, there was a great bustle, which could be heard in the street. There would be noise of opening and closing of desks and the lessons repeated in a loud voice. But on that particular day it was all very quiet. It was as quiet as Sunday morning.

The Last Lesson Class 12 Extra Questions Question 7.
Why were some elderly persons occupying the back benches that day? (2017 Delhi)
Answer:
The French districts of Alsace and Lorraine had-fallen into the hands of Prussians. The studying and teaching of French had been banned there. M.Hamel was a teacher of the French language. He had been teaching in that school for the last forty years. Next morning he was leaving the school for good. Therefore, the old men were sitting on the back benches. It was their way of thanking M.Hamel for his faithful service.

The Last Lesson Class 12 Questions And Answers Question 8.
Who were the elderly persons sitting at the back benches ?
Answer:
The elderly persons sitting at the back benches were the old Hauser who was wearing his three cornered hat, the former mayor, the former postmaster, and several others besides. Everybody was looking sad. Hauser had brought an old primer and he held it open on his knees with his spectacles lying across the pages.

The Last Lesson Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 9.
“What a thunderclap these words were to me!” What were those words and what was their effect on Franz?
Answer:
M.Hamel announced in the class that was his last class. The orders from Berlin had come to teach the German language in Alsace and Lorraine. These words came as a thunderclap to Franz. Now he started liking his books and M.Hamel in spite of his cranky nature.

The Last Lesson Very Short Question Answers Class 12 Question 10.
How did Franz react to the declaration that it was their last lesson?
Answer:
These words were like a thunderclap to Franz. He hardly knew reading and writing French. He used to waste his time on useless activities. He always considered his books a nuisance. Now he thought they were his best friends whom he couldn’t leave.

The Last Lesson Question And Answer Class 12 Question 11.
What had the narrator counted on to enter the school?
Answer:
Usually, when the school began, there was a great bustle, which could be heard in the street. There would be noise of opening and closing of desks and the lessons repeated in a loud voice, the teacher’s ruler would be rapping on the table. The narrator had counted on the commotion to get on his seat.

Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 1 Extra Questions Question 12.
What was the mood in the classroom when M.Hamel gave his last French lesson?
Answer:
The mood in the classroom was that of sadness. There was a pin drop silence in the class. Even the old people of the village had come to attend the class. They had come there to thank M.Hamel for his forty years of service.

The Last Lesson Extra Question Answer Class 12 Question 13.
How were the parents and M.Hamel responsible for the children’s neglect of the French language?
Answer:
Not only the children themselves but also their par-ents and M.Hamel were to some extent responsible for the children’s neglect of the French language. The parents would send their children to work on a farm or at a mill so that they could get some extra money. M. Hamel would often ask them to water his plants instead of teaching them. And when he wanted to go fishing, he would give them a holiday.

Extra Questions Of The Last Lesson Class 12 Question 14.
What did M.Hamel ask Franz to recite and how did Franz fare in it?
Answer:
M. Hamel asked Franz to recite the rules on participles. He wanted to recite it without any mistakes. But he mixed up on the very first words and stood there, holding on to his desk. His heart was beating and he didn’t dare to look up.

Last Lesson Question Answers Class 12 Question 15.
What happened when Franz heard his name called?
Answer:
Franz heard his name called. It was his turn to recite the rules for participles. But Franz had not learnt those. But he wanted that he could recite it in a clear and loud voice. But he got mixed up on the first words and stood there, holding on to his desk, his heart was beating, and he dared not look up.

Question 16.
What was the trouble with the people of Alsace according to M. Hamel ? Now what, he thought, would give the Germans to mock at them?
Answer:
According to M.Hamel, the people of Alsace used to shirk work. They often thought they had plenty of time. But now due to this attitude, they couldn’t learn their language any more. He said now the Germans would mock at them saying that they pretended to be the French. They couldn’t even speak or write their language.

Question 17.
What does M.Hamel say about the French language?
Answer:
M.Hamel says that French is the most beautiful language in the world the clearest, the most logical. He asks his students to guard their language and never forget it. According to him when people are enslaved, they have the key to their prison as long as they hold fast to their language.

Question 18.
What did M.Hamel teach his students on the last day of school?
Answer:
First of all, he taught his students grammar. After grammar, the students had a lesson in writing. Each student was given a new notebook. On each note-book, the words ‘France, Alsace, France, Alsace’ were written in beautiful handwriting. After the writing, the children had a lesson in history.

Question 19.
Franz was able to understand everything that day. Why?
Answer:
On that day Franz was able to understand quite well. All that M.Hamel said seemed to him so easy. Franz thought he had never listened so carefully and also M. Hamel had never explained everything with so much patience.

Question 20.
What happened when the clock struck twelve?
Answer:
When the clock struck twelve, the sound of Angelus (a prayer) could be heard. At the same moment, the trumpets of the Prussians returning from drill, sounded the windows. M.Hamel got up and wrote on the blackboard in very large letters ‘Long Live France!’.

Question 21.
What did M.Hamel do when the church-clock struck twelve?
Answer:
M. Hamel now knew it was the time to dismiss the school. He stood up. He was looking very pale. He wanted to say something but he was so full of emotions that he couldn’t speak anything. He took a piece of chalk and wrote on the blackboard‘Long Live France!’

Question 22.
What was Franz expected to be prepared with for school that day?
Answer:
He was expected to be prepared with rule of participles on that day.

Question 23.
What did Franz notice that was unusual?
Answer:
Usually, when school began, there was a great bustle, which could be heard out in the street. The opening and closing of desks could be heard and the children repeating their lesson in unison. But on that day, it was as quiet as Sunday morning.

Question 24.
What had been put on the bulletin board?
Answer:
On the bulletin board, it was put from the next day only the German language would be taught in the schools of Alsace. The teaching of French was totally banned and the teachers teaching French were asked to leave the place.

Question 25.
What changes did the orders from Beilin cause in school that day?
Answer:
Due to the orders from Berlin there was complete silence everywhere in the village school. Even the old people of the village had come there to thank M.Hamel for his faithful service of forty years.

Question 26.
How did Franz’s feelings about M.Hamel and school change?
Answer:
Franz always hated M. Hamel because he would often scold him and give him corporal punishment also. He didn’t like his school also. But now his feelings about M. Hamel and his school completely changed. He felt sorry for M.Hamel that now he had to leave the place where he had spent forty years.

Question 27.
The people in this story suddenly realise how precious their language is to them. What shows you this? Why does this happen?
Answer:
This story is set in the year 1870 in Alsace district of France. In the FrancoPrussian war (1870-71)France was defeated by Prussia and the French districts of Alsace and Lorraine went into the hands of Prussia. The Prussians there banned the teaching and study ing of the French language. The people of the village caine to attend the Last lesson by M.Hamel who had been teaching French there for the last forty years. In this way they pay their respect to their language French and also to their teacher MHamel.

Question 28.
Franz thinks, “Will they make them sing in German, even the pigeons?” what does this mean?
Answer:
This means that Prussians may thrust their language on the French people. They can also ban the studying and teaching of French. But they can never take away from them their love for the French language.

The Last Lesson Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Write the substance of this lesson.
Answer:
This lesson teaches us two very important values of life. First, a person should have knowledge of his language and culture and second, he should never shirk his work. Franz is a young school going boy. But he hates his school and teacher. He doesn’t have . knowledge of even his mother tongue-French. His teacher M.Hamel would often scold him and punish him for not doing his homework, but all in vain.

And when the Prussians invade their country and ban the teaching and studying of the French language, Franz comes to know the value of his language. He curses himself for not learning his language. M.Hamel thinks most of the people of his village shirk work. They think they have plenty of time to do any work. The students often put off learning till tomorrow. According to M.Hamel when people are enslaved, as long as they hold fast to their language it is as if they have the key to their prison. In this way it is M.Hamel brings to light the values of life that this story teaches us.

Question 2.
What changes did Franz find in school when the orders from Berlin came?
Answer:
The teaching and studying of the French language was banned in Alsace and Lorraine districts of France according to the orders from Berlin. Now Franz found that the whole atmosphere of the school was changed. Usually, when the school began, there was a great bustle, which could be heard out in the street. The opening and closing of the desks could be heard.

The children would repeat their lessons loudly in unison, and the teacher could be seen rapping his ruler on the table. But now it was quite still. That day everything was as quiet as on Sunday morning. M.Hamel was wearing his best dress that he never wore except on inspection and prize days. But the most surprising thing for Franz was that the old people of village were sitting on back benches.

Question 3.
What did M.Hamel tell the class before starting his lesson? What effect did it have on Franz?
Answer:
M.Hamel told his students that it was the last lesson he was going to give the children. The orders had come from Berlin to teach only German in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine. He further said that the new teacher would come the next day. He wanted his students to be very attentive.

These words were like a thunderclap to Franz. It was going to be his last French lesson. But he hardly knew how to write it. Also, he would not be able to learn it any more. He was feeling sorry for not learning his lessons. His books that seemed such a nuisance to him were now his old friends that he could not give up. The idea that M.Hamel was going away for good made him forget all about his ruler and how cranky he was.

Question 4.
What did M. Hamel ask Franz to recite and what was the result? How did 1VL Hamel react to it?
Answer:
M. Hamel asked Franz to recite the rule for participles. But Franz hadn’t learnt it. However, he wished he could recite the rule in a loud and clear voice, and without mistake. But he got mixed up on the first words and stood there, holding on to his desk and not looking up.

M.Hamel told him that he would not scold him. He further said his parents and he himself was responsible to some extent for all that. His parents were anxious to put him to some work to have some money and he would give his students a holiday when he wanted to go for fishing and sometimes instead of teaching, he would ask them to water his plants.

Question 5.
Give a brief character-sketch of M.Hamel.
Answer:
M.Hamel was a teacher of the French language in a village of Alsace district of France. He had been teaching French for the last forty years in that village. Everyone in the village had a great respect for him. His students thought he was cranky, but we didn’t find him cranky in any part of this story.

He was very honest. When Franz failed to recite the rule for participles, he blamed himself for giving children unnecessary holidays.
He had great passion for his subject. He knew that it was now the last day of his school and he had to leave the district the next day for good. Even then he taught his students so well that they understood everything he had taught.

He had great love for the French language. He called it the most beautiful, the clearest and the most logical language of the world. Indeed M.Hamel was a. great patriot.

Question 6.
Our native language is a part of culture and we are proud of it. How does the presence of village elders in the classroom and M.Hamel’s last lesson show their love for French?
Answer:
According to Hindi poet Methlisharan Gupt . The person who does not take pride in his language, culture and nation is like an animal and he is like a dead person. Every community has a natural attachment to its culture and language. It is our native language that we naturally learn from the lap of our mother . We can communicate in our native language more effectively and proficiently than in some other foreign language.

In this story, the Prussians invaded the French districts of Alsace and Lorraine. They banned the teaching and studying of the French language in these districts. All the teachers of the French language were asked to leave the districts of Alsace and Lorraine. M.Hamel is a teacher of the French language in a village in the district of Alsace. He had been teaching in a school the French language for the last forty years. The next day, he was leaving the village and school for good.

The elderly persons sitting at the back benches were the old Hauser who was wearing his three cornered hat, the former mayor, the former postmaster, and several others. Everybody was looking sad. Hauser had brought an old primer and he held it open on his knees with his spectacles lying across the pages. All these elderly persons had come to the school to pay their tribute to the selfless service of M.Hamel for forty years.

Question 7.
Is it possible to carry pride in one’s language too far? Explain ‘linguistic chauvinism’:
Answer:
‘Linguistic chauvinism’ is a feeling of strong dislike or hatred that seduces person to believe that his language is better than others in every term. This wrong belief leads a person, a race and even a country to dislike the language of others. Powerful nations want to impose their languages onto the weaker nations. As language is the sole preserver of history, culture and arts of any nation or society, therefore attack comes first on language. To defend their act of linguistic aggression, powerful ones air the theory of linguistic unity. But their hidden sinister motive is not to bring unity and winning over others as friends.

They just want to display their superiority complex and bring disintegration and friction among different communities. The linguistic community whose language is under threat mounts a strong challenge to preserve their own language. But it should be kept in mind that every language 1 has its own beauty and we should be ready to em-brace other languages also. Linguistic chauvinism means taking too much pride in one’s language and hatred towards the others’ languages. It should be discouraged in every possible way.

Question 8.
What do you think is the theme of the story ‘The Last Lesson’? What is the reason behind its universal appeal?
Answer:
Though the story discussed is located in a particular village of Alsace district of France which had passed into Prussian hands; the story definitely has a universal appeal. It highlights the invader’s desire to thrust forcefully his language and culture on the’ subjugated community and taking away their language and also their identity. Taking away . mother tongue and forcing others to accept a foreign tongue is the first step of any colonial aggression.

To resist any such advancement, one needs to embrace his own language firmly. M. Hamel, the French teacher of the school while giving his last lesson to the class advises them to love their language and keep it alive. He says that when the people are enslaved, as long as they hold fast to language it is as if they had the key to their prison.

The Prussians has banned the teaching and studying of French but they can never take away the love for the French language from the people. In this way the French people can retain their identity even before such constant pressure from new rulers. The theme definitely does not remain confined to the classroom of a school in Alsace district; rather it gathers a universal significance; as a roadmap to counter foreign aggression.

Question 9.
Everybody during the last lesson is filled with regret. Comment.
Answer:
In the year 1870, during the Franco-Prussian war the French districts of Alsace and Lorraine fell into the hands of Prussians. They harmed the teaching and studying of the French language in these districts. All the teachers of the French language were ordered to leave these districts. M.Hamel is one such teacher who teaches French in one of the villages of Alsace district. He has to leave his village the next day for good. Now he is delivering his last lesson of the French language.

Not only the students but also the village elders have come to attend the last class of French. Everybody in the class is full of regret. M.Hamel blames himself for giving too much holidays to his students and in this way not teaching them properly. The students like Franz blames themselves not learning their language properly. The village elders are also full of regret. They have not learnt their language prop¬erly when they were young. Now they have come there to pay their tribute to M.Hamel’s for forty years of selfless service.

Question 10.
The people in this story suddenly realise how precious their language is to them? What shows you this? Why does this happen?
Answer:
The people in this story didn’t take the study of their language seriously. They always used to think that they have ample time to learn their language. But in the Franco-Prussian war in 1870, the French districts of Alsace and Lorraine came into the hands of Prussians. They imposed a ban on the teaching and studying of French. They ordered all the teachers of the French languages to leave these districts. They wanted that the people there study only the Ger¬man language.

Now the people in the story realise how precious their language is to them. Now they regret that they haven’t learnt their language well. They realise that they can’t no more learn their language. M.Hamel is a teacher of the French language in of the villages of Alsace. He is delivering his last lesson of the French language. Not only the students but also the elders of the village come there to attend his class. It shows the people’s love for their language.

The Last Lesson Extra Questions and Answers Extract Based

Read the following paragraph and answer the questions that follow :

(Para 1)
Usually, when school began, there was a great bustle, which could be heard out in the street, the opening and closing of desks, lessons repeated in unison, very loud, with our hands over our ears to understand better, and the teacher’s great ruler rapping on the table. But now it was all so still! I had counted on the commotion to get to my desk without being seen; but, of course, that day everything had to be as quiet as Sunday morning.
Questions :
(a) What was the great bustle when school began usually?
(b) What do you understand by ‘Counted on the commotion?
(c) What was the scene of the classroom that day?
(d) Name the chapter and the writer.
Answers:
(a) When school began usually, there was a great bustle, which could be heard out in the street, the opening and closing of desks, lessons repeated in unison, very loud and teacher’s great ruler rapping on the table.

(b) Counted on the commotion’ means getting an advantage of hubbub, various heavy noises : disturbances spread out there.

(c) That day, there was no noise in the classroom, everything had to be as quiet as Sunday morning.

(d) The chapter is ‘The Last Lesson’ written by ‘Alphonse Daudet’.

(Para 2)

My last French lesson ! Why, I hardly knew how to write ! I should never learn any more ! I must stop there, then! Oh, how sorry I was for not learning my lessons, for seeking birds’ eggs, or going sliding on the Saar! My books, that had seemed such a nuisance while ago, so heavy to carry, my grammar and my history of the saints, were old friends now that I couldn’t give up. And M. Hamel, too; the idea that he was going away, that I should never see him again, made me forget all about his ruler and how cranky he was. \
Questions :
(a) How did Franz come to know that it was his last French lesson ?
(b) What did Franz usually do in place of learning his lessons ?
(c) Whom did Franz not give up then ?
(d) What feelings were appeared in Franz’s heart about M. Hamel ?
Answers:
(a) M. Hamel himself announced, “My Children, this is the last lesson I shall give you. The order has come from Berlin to teach only German in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine.” In this way, Franz came to know that it was his last French lesson.

(b) Franz usually went for seeking birds’ eggs or going sliding on the Saar ! Thus, he used to waste his time in place of learning his lessons.

(c) Franz couldn’t give up then his books, his grammar and his history of the saints. These were his old friends then after the announcement.

(d) Franz became very sad thinking that he should never see him again, he was going away. This made him forget all about his ruler and how cranky he was.

(Para 3)

Then, from one thing to another,’ M. Hamel went on to talk of the French language, saying that it was the most beautiful language in the world the clearest, the most logical; that we must guard it among us and never forget it, because when a people are enslaved, as long as they hold fast to their language it is as if they had the key to their prison. Then he opened a grammar and read us our lesson. I was amazed to see how well I understood it. All he said seemed so easy, so easy !

Questions:
(a) What did M. Hamel say about the French language ?
(b) What advise did M. Hamel give about the language ?
(c) ‘Key to their prison’, explain the phrase.
(d) Why Franz was amazed to see how well he understood.it ?
Answers:
(a) M. Hamel told about the French language that it was the most beautiful language in the world—the clearest, the most logical; that we must guard it among us and never forget it.

(b) M. Hamel advised to guard the language among us and never forget it, because when a people are enslaved, as long as they hold fast to their language it is as if they had the key to their prison.

(c) ‘Key to their prison’ means ‘an escape from the sla very/boundation’. This was referred by M. Hamel to the villagers.

(d) Franz was amazed to see how well he understood it because before that day, he was unable to understand anything regarding studies, actually he was careless then.

(Para 4)
All at once the churchclock struck twelve. Then the Angelus. At the same moment the trumpets of the Prassians, returning from drill, sounded under our windows. Mi Hamel stood up, very pale, in his chair. I never saw him look so tall. “My friends”, said he, “I—I—” But something choked him. He could not go on.

Questions :
(a) What is an ‘Angelus’ ?
(b) What did Franz listen under their windows ?
(c) ‘I never saw him look so tali’. What does this mean ?
(d) Why M. Hamel couldn’t speak ? What choked him ?
Answers :
(a) An ‘Angelus’ is a Catholic denotion/prayers memorializing the incarnation. (Prayer for the honour of the God).

(b) Franz noticed the trumpets of the Prussians, returning from the drill, sounded under their windows.

(c) ‘I never saw him look so tall’ means that Franz never saw M. Hamel so tired, depressed and disappointed. He (M. Hamel) was looking very pale and apathetic and lifeless.

(d) M. Hamel couldn’t speak due to extensive sorrow and the wheeze (cough) choked his throat as he was internally agonized.

Poets and Pancakes Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Poets and Pancakes Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Here we are providing Poets and Pancakes Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo, Extra Questions for Class 12 English was designed by subject expert teachers. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-12-english/

Poets and Pancakes Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Poets and Pancakes Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

Poets And Pancakes Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 1.
Why did the legal adviser lose his job in the Gemini Studios?
Answer:
The legal adviser worked in the story department of the Gemini Studios which was later closed by the boss. So, in this way, the legal adviser lost his job.

Poets And Pancakes Extra Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 2.
What do you understand by ‘the fiery misery’ of those subjected to make up?
Answer:
The makeup room was glowed by many incandescent lights which produced very fiery heat. Artists had to face that extreme heat as they had to sit there for makeup. They were pitiful and could not do anything in this regard.

Poet And Pancakes Question Answer Class 12 Question 3.
What was the poet’s preconceived idea about communism?
Answer:
The poet opined that the communists were heart-less and godless persons. They did not love their wife, children as well as relatives. They were always ready for violence and to tease the innocent people.

Poets And Pancakes Question Answers Class 12 Question 4.
Who was Greta Garbo?
Answer:
Greta Garbo was a Swedish actress who received honorary Oscar for her unforgettable screen performances. Guiness Book of World Records named her the most beautiful woman who ever lived and she was also voted Best Silent Actress of the country.

Poets And Pancakes Question Answer Class 12 Question 5.
What do you infer of Robert Clive from the text?
Answer:
Robert Clive was Commander-in-Chief of British India who owned many buildings in Madras and fought many battles and married a maiden in St. Mary’s Church in Fort St. George in Madras.

Question Answer Of Poets And Pancakes Class 12 Question 6.
What do you understand by national integration?
Answer:
The national integration is a combination which consists of each and every, many castes, tribes and communities in it. National Integration is above than any of the religion or thinking and it unites various people from various places and cultures.

Poets And Pancakes Textual Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 7.
What is a hierarchy?
Answer:
Hierarchy is a process in which members of any of the organigation or society are ranked according to relatives their, their status and authorities.

Poets And Pancakes Solutions Class 12 Question 8.
What is the designation‘a office boy’ signify?
Answer:
The office boy is a person of no age limit who works in various offices and departments. He simply does the ordinary or menial tasks as fetching the coffee or drinks, filing, introducing visitors to the office etc.

Poets And Pancakes Important Questions Class 12 Question 9.
What happened with Subbu’s literary achieve-ments? ‘
Answer:
Though, Subbu was a tailor made for films but he had a talent of poetry and writing novels. Later, as his filmy career grew higher, his literary talent and achievements were overshadowed and dwarfed by his own success.

Poets And Pancakes Class 12 Questions And Answers Question 10.
What could be the reason of the shut of the story department?
Answer:
The story department was comprised of many poets and writers and also a lawyer with them. But later, it was closed. The possible reason for the shutting down of the story department may be its uselessness or unbearable expenses or regular salary of the members and less output in return.

Poets And Pancakes Questions And Answers Pdf Question 11.
Which poets from England were known to the Gemini Studios’ staff ?
Answer:
The ordinary staff of the Gemini Studios knew or heard about Wordsworth and Tennyson; and the more literate ones knew of Keats, Shelly and Byron or about Eliot. But they didn’t know about Stephen Spender, who was invited at the Gemini Studios.

Question 12.
‘The God That Failed’ was the composition of six eminent men of letters. Describe.
Answer:
The God That Failed’ contained six separate essays of six renowned essayists about their journeys into communism and their disillusioned return. Those six distinguished writers were : Andre Gide, Richard Wright, Ignazio Silone, Arthur Koestler, Louis Fischer and Stephen Spender.

Question 13.
What does the writer mean by ‘the fiery misery’ of those subjected to make-up?
Answer:
The writer means that the artists who were subjected to make-up had to bear very intense heat due to the multiple incandescent lights and reflecting big mirrors.

Question 14.
What is the example of national integration that the author refers to?
Answer:
Make-up department is the fine example of national integration that the author refers to as people from various and distinct parts of India used to work there together.

Question 15.
What work did the ‘office boy’ do in the Gemini Studios? Why did he join the studios? Why was he disappointed?
Answer:
During the crowd shooting in the Gemini Studios, the office boy used to paint their faces slapping with heavy paint. Thinking that he would become a top star, screen writer or a director or lyrics writer; he joined the Gemini Studios. He couldn’t succeed and was disappointed due to his faliure and thought that his talent was going to be wasted.

Question 16.
Why did the author appear to be doing nothing at the studios?
Answer:
The author’s duty was to cut the newspaper clip-pings for the subject, arrange them in a file and some-times writing by hand and this work appeared to be ^useless or valueless in others’ view.

Question 17.
Why was the office boy frustrated? Who did he show his anger on?
Answer:
The office boy was frustrated because he assumed that his talent was being wasted working in a department that was suitable only for barbers and perverts. He showed his anger on Kothamangalam Subbu for his negligence and dishonour.

Question 18.
Who was Subbu’s principal?
Answer:
Mr. S.S. Vasan, the owner of the Gemini Studios, was the principal of Subbu.

Question 19.
Subbu is described as a many-sided genius. List four of his special abilities.
Answer:
Though Subbu was a versatile character having many qualities, nevertheless his main four abilites can be counted as following: he was tailor-made for films, could solve any of the problem; he, being a poet could write any type of poetry; he was always joyful and having very sound relationship with his relatives and acquaintances; and lastly he was also having a talent of writing novels.

Question 20.
Why was the legal advisor referred to as the opposite by others?
Answer:
Instead of solving the legal problems of the people, the legal advisor himself used to create problems for them. Once, when a talented heroine heard her own voice, she was disappointed and her growth and career became steady and unfruitful.

Question 21.
What made the lawyer stand out from the others at Gemini Studios?
Answer:
The lawyer, in comparision with other members of story department, used to wear trousers, shirts and tie whereas others wore dhotis and especially khadi. So, sometimes wearing a coat also, the lawyer stood out different from others.

Question 22.
Did the people at Gemini Studios have any particular political affiliations?
Answer:
No, the people at Gemini Studios had no political affiliations. They wore khadi and were devotees of Gandhiji. They didn’t have any opinion about any political party or even with communism.

Question 23.
Why was the Moral Re-armament Army welcomed at the Studios?
Answer:
The Moral Rearmement Army was welcomed at the Gemini Studios as they staged two successful plays many a times and the army was invited by the owner of the Gemini Studios. They were also appreciated for their sense of costumes and arrangements.

Question 24.
Give one example to show that Gemini Studios was influenced by the plays staged by MRA.
Answer:
The Gemini Studios was actually influenced by the sunset and sunrise scenes presented by MRA through their play ‘Jotham Valley’, The scene seemed to be unique with white background and a tune played on the flute.

Question 25.
Who was the boss of Gemini Studios?
Answer:
Mr. S.S. Vasan was the boss of Gemini Studios.

Question 26.
What caused the lack of communication between the Englishman and the people at Gemini Studios?
Answer:
People at the Gemini Studios were totally unknown about the strange accent of the Englishman and couldn’t understand his wordings so this was the cause of lack of communication.

Question 27.
Why is the Englishman’s visit referred to as unexplained mystery?
Answer:
Englishman’s visit is referred to as unexplained mystery because nobody could understand the purpose of his visit as studio’s people made Tamil films for the simplest sort of people and they had no taste for English poetry.

Question 28.
Who was the English visitor to the studios?
Answer:
Stephen Spender, an English poet and editor was the English visitor to the Gemini Studios.

Question 29.
How did the author discover who the English visitor to the studio was?
Answer:
The author was interested in a contest organised by a British periodical ‘The Encounter’. So for periodicals, he went to British council library where he saw the prints of ‘The Encounter’. He discovered the editor’s name which was ‘Stephen Spender’ an Englishman who visited the Gemini Studios.

Question 30.
What does ‘The God That Failed’ refer to?
Answer:
‘The God That Failed’ refers to a collection of six essays by six eminent men of letters. It was their journey to enter into the communism and their dis-illusioned return.

Question 32.
Why was Kothamangalam Subbu considered No.2 in Gemini Studios?
Answer:
Kothammangalam Subbu, a Brahmin was a multi-talented personality. He used to solve each and every problem of Gemini Studios. He was very close to the boss and was always seemed with him. He commanded all the activities of all the persons related to the Gemini Studios. So we can say that Subbu was the next boss of the Gemini Studios.

Poets and Pancakes Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Write a brief note on what you have learnt about Subbu’s Character?
Answer:
Subbu, Kothamangalam Subbu was a Brahmin by caste and placed at no. 2 position at the Gemini Studios. He always remained cheerful and satisfied. Though he was very generous to all people of the Gemini Studios as well as all the relatives and acquaintances, yet he too was having his woes. People disliked him because of his closeness to the boss. He was very loyal to his boss.

At Gemini Studios, he had the solution of all problems at one place. He seemed to be indulged in every important affair of the company. He also had the artistic talent as he was a poet and novelist also. He used to write in a simple way for common mass as he composed several folk dictions and deftly created characters for novel. He was an amazing actor though never acted for a lead role but got more praise than the main character. He was a tailor-made actor with unmatchable capacities.

Question 2.
What was Moral Re-armament Army? Describe about their journey to the Gemini Studios?
Answer:
Frank Buchman’s Moral Re-armament Army came to the Gemini Studios in 1952. It was a drama company with 200 strong and expert artists named as international cricus. All those persons belonged to twenty different countries. They performed two different plays successfully representing simple homilies with fine dressings and an effective set.

Plays played by the players were ‘Jotham Valley’ and ‘The Forgotten Factor’ which were widely appreciated by the members of the studios. The scenes of sunrise and sunset were hugely copied by the audience for many years. Those scenes were played on a bare stage with a white background and a tune was played on the flute. Thus MRA influenced the spectators in a very impressive manner.

Question 3.
Describe the make-up department of Gemini Studios?
Answer:
The make-up department of the Gemini Studios was established on the upstairs of a building that was believed to have been Robert Clive’s stables. The make-up room had the look of a hair-cutting salon with lights at all angles. The lights were incandescent which produced the extreme heat and about half dozen big mirrors reflected the light, that was totally unbearable for the artists to be made-up.

The make-up department was first headed by a Bengali who when left, a Maharashtrian headed it with an assistant Dharwar Kannadiga, an Andhra, a Madras Indian Christian, an Anglo-Burmese and the usual local Tamils. In this way, there was a great deal of national integration. A strict hierarchy could be noticed at make-up department. The chief make-up man attended to the chief actors and actresses. His senior assistant looked to the ‘second’ hero and heroine, the junior assistant the main comedian and so forth.

The players who played the crowd were the responsibility of the office boy. He used to mix his paint in a giant vessel and slap it on the crowd players. So, the gang of nationally integrated make-up men could turn any decent-looking person into a hideous crimson hued monster with the help of truck-loads of Pancake and a number of other locally made potions and lotions. Thus, the make-up room was not less than a torcher room for the artists who were to be prepared for the shoot.

Question 4.
How does the author describe the incongruity of an English poet addressing the audience at Gemini Studios?
Answer:
Only Tamil films were made in the Gemini Studios and the peoples of the Gemini Studios had nothing to do with the English poetry. Not any of the English visitor could generate any point of interest among Gemini Studios’ peoples regarding English poetry and they were also unable to understand the strange and different accent of the Englishmen. So it was surely the incongruity of an English poet ad-dressing the audience at Gemini Studios and the anthor found no productivity of any talent or knowledge through the visits of Englishmen.

Question 5.
What do you understand about the author’s literary inclinations from the account?
Answer:
Author, though had a work of newspaper cutting collection in the Gemini Studios but undoubtedly this belonged to his literary taste which also required the sound knowledge of literature.

He needed be aware about different papers and periodicals also. After his retirement, he continued reading habit so once when he found a low priced edition of‘The God That Failed’, he immediately bought it. This account reveals his literary taste that made him a successful writer also.

Question 6.
The author has used gentle humour to point out human problems. Pick out instances of this to show how this serves to make the piece interesting.
Answer:
Many instances of humour are used by the author in this piece. Scenes of makeup department and usage of Pancakes is very humorous. It was more a hair cutting saloon than the makeup room containing too much lights and mirrors. Makeup team could easily convert an ordinary man into a hideous crimson hued monster.

According to the strict hierarchy, people were fixed for various levels artists. A office boy, though a 40 years man he was, joined the Gemini Studios to become a star actor, a writer or a lyricist but failed and started to motivate others though he himself had as failed to achieve his aim.

Poets and Pancakes Extra Questions and Answers Extract Based

Read, the following paragraph and answer the questions that follow:

(Para-1)

A strict hierarchy was maintained in the make up department. The chief make up man made the chief actors and actresses ugly, his senior assistant the ‘second’ hero and heroine, the junior assistant the main comedian, and so forth. The players who played the crowd were the responsibility of the office boy. (Even the make up department of the Gemini Studios had on ‘office boy!) On the days when there was a crowd-shooting, You could see him mixing his paint in a giant vessel and slapping it on the crowd players.

Questions:
(a) What do you understand by ‘hierarchy’ ?
(b) Whose responsibility was to make up the crowd ?
(c) How the office boy used to prepare the make up paint?
(d) Name the chapter and the writer.
Answers :
(a) Hierarchy is a system in which members/ participants of any oragnisation/ company are ranked according to relation or their authority.
(b) The crowd was made-up by the office boy of Gemini Studios.
(c) The office boy used to prepare the make up paint by mixing it (paint) in a giant vessel.
(d) The chapter’s name is ‘Poets and Pancakes’ by ‘Asokamitran’.

(Para-2)

An extremely talented actress, who was also extremely temperamental, once blew over on the sets. While every¬one stood stunned, the lawyer quietly switched on the re¬cording equipment. When the actress paused for breath, the lawyer said to her, “One minute, please,” and played back the recording. There was nothing incriminating or unmentionably foul about the actress’s tirade against the producer. But when she heard her voice again through the sound equipment, she was struck dumb.

Questions :
(a) What happened to the actress once on the sets ?
(b) What did the lawyer said in the mid of the shot ?
(c) Was there something special about actress’s tirade ?
(d) Why was the actress struck dumb ?
Answers:
(a) Once on the sets, the actress with extremely tempera-mental blew over.
(b) In the mid of the shot, the lawyer said to the actress, “One minute, please,” and played back the recording.
(c) No, nothing was special and mentionable about the actress’s tirade.
(d) The actress struck dumb when she heard her own voice again through the sound equipment.

(Para-3)

Gemini Studios was the favourite haunt of poets like
S.D.S. Yogiar, Sangu Subramanyam, Krishna Sastry and Harindranath Chattopadhyaya. It had an excellent mess which supplied good coffee at all times of the day and for most part of the night. Those were the days when Congress rule meant Prohibition and meeting over a cup of coffee was rather satisfying entertainment. Barring the office boys and a couple of clerks, everybody else at the Studios radiated leisure, a pre-requisite for poerty.

Questions :
(a) Why all four poets mentioned above gathered at Gemini Studios ?
(b) What was the use of mess at Gemini Studios ?
(c) What was the meaning of Congress rule those days ?
(d) Why leisure, a pre-requisite for poetry was ?
Answers:
(a) All four poets mentioned above gathered at Gemini Studios because it was an excellent place for discussion and they felt relaxed gathering there.
(b) Mess at Gemini Studios supplied good coffee at all times of the day and for most part of the night.
(c) Congress rules, those days meant ‘Prohibition’.
(d) Leisure was a pre-requisite for poetry because poetry was liked by not only office boys or clerks but by everybody there.

(Para-4)

A few months later, the telephone lines of the big bosses of Madras buzzed and once again we at Gemini Studios cleared a whole shooting stage to welcome another visitor. All they said was that he was a poet from England. The only poets from England the simple Gemini staffknew or heared of were Word worth and Tennyson; the more literate ones knew of Keats, Shelly and Byron; and one or two might have faintly come to know of someone by the name Eliot. Who was the poet visiting the Gemini Studios now ?

Questions: .
(a) Why did they clear the whole shooting stage ?
(b) What did they come to know about the visitor ?
(c) Which poets were known among the more literate peoples of Gemini Studios ?
(d) Was they sure about the visitor that time ?
Answers:
(a) They cleared the whole shooting stage to welcome an another visitor at Gemini Studios.
(b) They came to know that the visitor might be a poet from England..
(c) Keats, Shelley and Byron were known among the more literatre peoples of Gemini Studios.
(d) No, they were not sure about the visitor that time.

(Para-5)

And years later, when I was out of Gemini Studios and I had much time but not much money, anything at a reduced price attracted my attention. On the footpath in front of the Madras Mount Road Post Office, there was a pile of brand new books for fifty paise each. Actually they were copies of the same book, an elegant paperback of American origin. ‘Special low-priced student edition, in connection with the 50th Anniversary of the Russian Revolution’.

Questions :
(a) What attracted the writer and why ?
(b) Where did the writer find new books ?
(c) What do you understand by ‘paper back’ ?
(d) Why those books on footpath were so cheap ?
Answers:
(a) Anything at a reduced price attracted the attention of the writer because his pockets were not full of money.
(b) On the footpath in front of the Madras Mount Road Post Office, the writer found new books.
(c) Paperback is a type of book characterized by a thick paper or paperboard cover, and stick together with glue rather than stitches or staples.
(d) Those books on footpath were so cheap because those were the books, special low-priced student edition, in connection with the 50th Anniversary of the Russian Revolution.

The Tiger King Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Vistas

The Tiger King Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Vistas

Here we are providing The Tiger King Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Vistas, Extra Questions for Class 12 English was designed by subject expert teachers. https://ncertmcq.com/extra-questions-for-class-12-english/

The Tiger King Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Vistas

The Tiger King Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

The Tiger King Extra Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 1.
What were the different names given to the King of Pratibandapuram?
Answer:
The king of Pratibandapuram was known as many different names. He may be identified as His Highness Jamedar-General, Khiledar-Major, Sata Vyaghra Samhari, Maharajdhiraj Visva Bhuvana Samrat, Sir Jilani Jung Jung Bahadur, M.A.D., A.C.T.C. or C.R.C.K.

The Tiger King Class 12 Question Answers Question 2.
How did the Tiger King acquire his name?
Answer:
The king of Pratibandapuram got the name of Tiger King as it was prophesized that his death would come from the hundredth tiger. Therefore he decided to kill hundred tigers before pursuing any other affairs. He killed so many tigers that he came to be known as the Tiger King.

The Tiger King Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 3.
When he was only ten days old, a prediction was made about the future of the Tiger King. What was ironic about it?
Answer:
When the Tiger King was born, the astrologers predicted that one day the royal infant had to die. They further said that the death would come from the hundredth tiger. The Tiger King did die because of the hundredth tiger. But ironically, the tiger was not the real tiger. It was a toy tiger made of wood.

The Tiger King Short Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 4.
Why did the Maharaja decide to get married?
Answer:
The Maharaja had killed all the tigers in his kingdom. But the number of killed tigers was only seventy. He still needed thirty more tigers to kill to fulfil his vow. Therefore, he decided to marry the princess from the kingdom which had a large number of tiger population.

The Tiger King Question Answers Class 12 Question 5.
When was the Tiger King stand in danger of losing his kingdom?
Answer:
A British officer wanted to hunt a tiger in the Tiger King’s kingdom. But the king denied him the per-mission. Then the officer sent the word that the actual killing could be done by the king himself, he only wanted to stand on the carcass of the tiger and be photographed. But the king even refused to do that. As a result the king was standing in danger of losing his kingdom.

Tiger King Question Answers Class 12 Question 6.
How did the Tiger King manage to retain his kingdom?
Answer:
The king ordered fifty diamond rings from a famous jeweller. He sent all the rings to the wife of the officer. He thought that the lady would keep one or two rings and send back the remaining. But she kept all the fifty rings. The king had to bear the expense of three lac rupees for it, but he managed to save his kingdom.

The Tiger King Class 12 Important Questions And Answers Question 7.
Why did the Maharaja ban tiger hunting in his state?
Answer:
The Maharaja had to fulfil his vow of killing hundred tigers. Therefore the tiger hunting was banned by anyone except the Maharaja. A proclamation was issued that if anyone dared to throw even a stone at a tiger, all his wealth and property would be confiscated.

The Tiger King Question Answer Class 12  Question 8.
What sort of hunt did the Maharaja offer to organise for the high-ranking British officer? What trait of the officer does it reveal?
Answer:
The Maharaja offered to organise a boar hunt, a mouse hunt, even a mosquito hunt for him, but not a tiger hunt. However, the officer sent word that he only wanted to stand on the carcass of the tiger and be photographed. But the king even refused to do that. This shows the vanity and shallowness of the officer.

Question Answer Of The Tiger King Class 12 Question 9.
How did the king ‘kill’ the tiger?
Answer:
In fact, the king did not kill the tiger. The bullet had missed it. It had fainted from the shock of the bullet whizzing past. One of the hunters took aim from a distance of one foot and shot the tiger.

The Tiger King Class 12 Question Answers Short Question 10.
Why did the king order the dewan to double the tax?
Answer:
The king could not find the hundredth tiger to hunt. As the days passed, his anxiety reached alarmingly. One day when his rage was at its height, the king called the dewan and ordered him to double the land tax.

Tiger King Questions And Answers Class 12  Question 11.
Why was the dewan not in favour of doubling the tax? What did the king then ordered him to do?
Answer:
The dewan told that in case the tax is doubled the people would become discontented. Then their state would fall a prey to the Indian National Congress. Then the king ordered the dewan to resign from his post.

The Tiger King Important Questions Class 12 Question 12.
How was the royal infant brought up?
Answer:
The royal infant drank the milk of an English cow, was brought up by an English nanny, tutored English by an Englishman, saw nothing but English films. His life was exactly like the other crown princes of the other Indian states.

The Tiger King Very Short Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 13.
Why did one of the hunters kill the hundredth tiger?
Answer:
When the hunters went near the tiger, they found that the tiger was not dead; the bullet had missed it. They decided that the king must not come to know that he had missed his target. They thought they would lose their jobs. Therefore, one of the hunters took aim from a distance of one foot and shot the tiger.

The Tiger King Class 12 Extra Question Answers Question 14.
Why did the dewan arrange the hundredth . tiger for the king?
Answer:
When the king could not find the hundredth tiger he ordered the dewan to resign from his post. To save his post, the dewan went to the People’s Park in Madras and brought a tiger from there. It was a very old tiger.

Tiger King Extra Questions Class 12 Question 15.
What happened to the tiger provided by the dewan?
Answer:
The tiger provided by the dewan was very old. The dewan left it in the forest where the king was hunting. The tiger wandered into the presence of the king. The king took a careful aim and shot at him. The tiger fell in a crumpled heap.

Question 16.
What present did the king brought for his son on his third birthday? How much did he pay for it?
Answer:
The king brought a wooden tiger on the third birth-day of his son. The shopkeeper quoted its price to be three hundred rupees. But the king did not pay him anything and took the tiger with him saying that it would be the offering to the crown prince from the shopkeeper.

Question 17.
How did the Tiger King meet his death?
Answer:
The king brought a wooden tiger as a birthday gift for his son. It was made by some unskilled carpenter. One of the slivers of its body pierced the king’s hand. Soon the infection developed. Three surgeons operated the king’s hand. But the king could not be saved.

Question 18.
Why was the Maharaja sunk in gloom even after having killed seventy tigers?
Answer:
The Maharaja had managed to kill seventy tigers, during ten years. As a result, the tiger population became extinct in his kingdom. This made the Maharaja gloomy because he thought he would not be able to achieve his target of killing a hundred tigers and so his life would be in danger.

Question 19.
How did the royal infant grew up?
Answer:
The royal infant grew taller and stronger day by day. He drank the milk of an English cow, was brought up by an English nanny, tutored English by an Englishman, saw nothing but English films. His life was exactly like the other crown princes of the other Indian states. When he came at the age of twenty, the state, which had been with the Court of Wards, came into his hands.

Question 20.
What did the Maharaja do to find the required number of tigers to kill?
Answer:
The Maharaja had killed all the tigers in his kingdom. But the number of killed tigers was only seventy. He still needed thirty more tigers to kill to fulfil his vow. Therefore, he married the princess from the kingdom which had a large number of tiger population.

Question 21.
How will the Maharaj a prepare himself for the hundredth tiger which was supposed to decide his fate?
Answer:
The Maharaja must be extra careful with the hundredth tiger. He still remembered the astrologer’s word, “Even after killing ninetymine tigers, the Maharaja should beware of the hundredth.” The Maharaja thought that after killing the hundredth tiger, he would leave tiger hunting for good.

The Tiger King Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
How did the Tiger King stand in danger of losing his kingdom? How was he able to avoid the danger? Explain.
Answer:
A British officer wanted to hunt tiger in the Tiger King’s kingdom. But the king denied him the per-mission. Then the officer sent the word that the actual killing can be done by the king himself, he only wanted to stand on the carcass of the tiger and be photographed. But the king even refused to do that. As a result the king was standing in danger of losing his kingdom.

The king ordered fifty diamond rings from a famous jeweller. He sent all the rings to the wife of the officer. He thought that the lady would keep one or two rings and sent back the remaining. But she kept all the fifty rings. The king had to bore the expense of three lac rupees for it, but he managed to save his kingdom.

Question 2.
What rumour was rife in Pratibandapuram about the crown prince Jung Jung Bahadur?
Answer:
When the king was born, the astrologers foretold that one day the Tiger King would actually would have to die. A great miracle took place. An astonishing phrase emerged from the lips of the tenday old Jilani Jung Jung Bahadur. He said, “All those who are born will one day have to die. There would be some sense if you could tell us the manner of that death.”

At this the chief astrologer said that the prince was born in the hour of Bull. The Tiger and the Bull are enemies, therefore, the death would come from the Tiger. At this the crown prince thundered, “Let tigers beware!” This rumour was quite rife in Pratibandapuram. When the crown prince came of age of twenty, the state came to his hands. Then he also heard about this rumour.

Question 3.
The astrologers predicted about the king, “The child will grow up to become the warrior of warriors, hero of heroes, champion of champions.” Do you think this prediction was right?
Ares.
The astrologers predicted about the king that he would grow into warrior of warriors, hero of heroes and champion of champions. However, this prediction was nothing but flattery. The second part of the prediction was that the death of the king would come from a tiger. The king do nothing in his life but killed tigers.

There is no bravery in killing innocent animals with the help of a gun. In fact, the king was not a warrior but a coward. To safeguard his life, he didn’t care about the ecology, about his people and the interests of his kingdom. Ironically, his death was also like his life. He didn’t die while fighting in the battlefield. But a wooden tiger became the cause of his death.

Question 4.
The astrologer’s prediction about the death of the Tiger King came to be true. Do you agree with this statement?
Answer:
To some extent, we can agree with the statement that the astrologer’s prediction about the death of the Tiger King came to be true. The astrologer had predicted that the death of the Tiger King would come from the hundredth tiger. The king started killing tigers recklessly. The hundredth tiger was not killed by the king himself but by the hunters, who found out that the old tiger had not died by the bullet of the king but only fainted by the bullet whizzing past him.

The hundredth tiger was a wooden toy tiger which the king had presented to his three- year old son. It killed the king merely by a sliver of wood protruding from it that pierced his right hand. The wound developed puss and it soon spread all over the arm. The best surgeons failed to save the king and thus, the astrologer’s prediction about the death of the Tiger King proved to be correct.

Question 5.
What values of life does the story “Tiger King” give us?
Answer:
This story tells us that there is a dire need to con-serve the wild life on this Earth. The protagonist of this story is a comical king whom the story writer calls the Tiger King. On the basis of a mere prediction he stared killing tigers recklessly in his kingdom. As a result the tigers in his state became extinct. Then he started killing tigers in the kingdom of his father-in-law and there also the tigers became extinct.

The story writer wants to tell us that there is need to maintain the ecological balance of this earth. In the absence of this balance the life can’t be sustained. The author also exposes the folly, cruelty and heartlessness of humans with regard to their attitude towards the wild animals.

Question 6.
How can you say that the dewan was a comical character?
Answer:
The dewan in this story is indeed a comical character. He is sycophant, hypocrite and flatterer. When the tigers became extinct in the Tiger King’s kingdom, the king decided to marry a princess of a kingdom where there was a large population of tigers. The king sent for his dewan and told him brandishing his gun that there remained thirty more tigers to be killed.

The dewan became frightened and told the king that he was not a tiger. He thought perhaps the king wanted to kill him. Then the king told him that he wanted to get married. The foolish dewan thought that perhaps the king wanted to marry with him. He replied, “Your Majesty, I have two wives already.” Then the king told him, “What I want is a …” The foolish dewan before completing the king’s statement said, “A Tiger King is more than enough for this state. It doesn’t need a Tiger Queen as well!” All these statements of the dewan indicate that he was a comical character.

Question 7.
Who was the Tiger King? Why did he get that name?
Answer:
The King of Pratibandapuram was known as the Tiger King. When he was born, the astrologers fore¬told that his death would come from a Tiger. When the king came of age at twenty years, he learnt about the prophesy. There were many forests in his state. The Maharaja started on a tiger hunt. He was thrilled beyond measure when he killed his first tiger. He showed it to the state astrologer. But the state astrologer replied, “Your majesty may kill ninety-nine tigers in exactly the same manner.

But, you must be very careful with the hundredth tiger.” The Maharaja decided to kill hundred tigers first before doing anything else. Tiger hunting was banned by anyone except the Maharaja. A proclamation was issued that if anyone dared to throw even a stone at a tiger, all his wealth and property would be confiscated. Maharaja faced many dangers also while hunting but he braved all the dangers. As a result the king came to be known as the Tiger King.

Question 8.
What happened to the astrologer? Do you think the prophecy was indisputably disproved?
Answer:
The astrologer had already died, therefore he could neither be awarded nor punished. His prophesy was true but not indisputably. The astrologer had said that the king must be careful with the hundredth tiger. But the king was not careful about it. He didn’t stop to ascertain whether the hundredth tiger had been killed or not.

In fact the hundredth tiger was killed by a hunter not the king. We can say that for the king, the hundredth tiger was the wooden tiger and he died because of it. The king didn’t die because of any real tiger.

Question 9.
The story is a satire on the conceit of those in power. How does the author employ the literary device of dramatic irony in the story?
Answer:
This story on the surface level appears to be a very simple story of a cranky king, who just on the basis of a prophesy starts killing tigers ruthlessly. This story is a bit comical and also has an element of suspense in it.But on the deeper level, this story is in fact a satire on the conceit of those in power. As a king, Jilani Jung Jung Bahadur has a lot of responsibilities. But he focuses his whole attention on the killing of tigers.

For his personal purposes, he proclaims that anybody in his kingdom is not allowed even to throw a stone at a tiger. All his activities are centred on the tiger hunting. The astrologer has told him that his death would come from the hundredth tiger. The king died but ironically the cause of his death is not a real tiger but only a wooden king. Thus, in this story, the writer satirised those in power by using the device of irony.

Question 10.
What is the author’s indirect comment on subjecting innocent animals to the willfulness of human beings?
Answer:
In this story, the author brings out the cruelty of human beings towards the wild animals. On the basis of a mere prophesy, the king starts killing tigers ruthlessly in his kingdom. He has killed so many that the tigers became extinct in his state. Then he killed all the tigers in his father-in-law’s state also. When he has killed ninety-nine tigers, he could not find the hundredth one to complete his vow.

His dewan arranges an old tiger from Madras People’s Park. This tiger is so weak and old that it could not cause any harm to the king. But even then the king shows no mercy and aims at it. Though the tiger couldn’t be killed by him, a hunter later kills him. In this story, we are also told about the cruelty and conceit of a British officer who is quite fond of tiger hunting. Thus, in this story, the author exposes the cruelty and folly of human beings regarding their behaviour towards the wild animals.

Question 11.
How would you describe the behaviour of the ‘ Maharaja’s minions towards him? Do you find them truly sincere towards him or are they driven by fear when they obey him? Do we find a similarity in today’s political order?
Answer:
The Maharaja’s minions are very selfish, hypocrite and flatterers. They are not at all sincere towards him. They are just yes men. No one among those tried to tell the king that his ruthless hunting of tigers was not good. Rather his dewan brings for him an old tiger from the People’s Park in Madras. They are all driven by fear. They obey him only because of fear.

And fear can never bring sincerity. We can find the same position in modern political system also. Though in our country there is democracy, political parties rule the country. In almost every politics, the power is centralized and the normal workers follow their leaders blindly. We can say that they are just like copies of the king’s minions.

Question 12.
Can you relate instances of game-hunting among the rich and the powerful in the present times that illustrate the callousness of human beings towards wildlife?
Answer:
There have been a number of examples in the present times that show the rich and the powerful people drive pleasure in game-hunting. These people think that they are above law and with the help of high class lawyers they can’t be punished. A former nawab and cricketer was found indulged in gamehunting. A case against a Bollywood star is still pending in the court. This shows the callousness of human beings towards wild life.

Question 13.
We need a new system for the age of ecology a system which is embedded in the care of all people and also in the care of the Earth and all life upon it. Discuss.
Answer:
Our present system of ecology is badly distorted. The nature has provided us an ecosystem to maintain the perfect balance between human beings and animals. This system provides us the best way to sustain our life on this Earth. It is an excellent system. But man in his greed has disturbed this cycle or ecosystem.

Due to deforestation, poaching and other development activities of man, the species of wild animals are becoming extinct. The forests are turning to concrete jungles. This is very harmful for us and for our coming generations. Therefore, the time has come to evolve a new system that can help to sustain life on this Earth.

Going Places Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Going Places Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Here we are providing Going Places Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo, Extra Questions for Class 12 English was designed by subject expert teachers.

Going Places Extra Questions and Answers Important Questions Class 12 English Flamingo

Going Places Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

Going Places Short Question Answer Class 12 Question 1.
Who was Jansie and Sophie? Where were they likely to find work?
Answer:
Jansie and Sophie were two school-going girls. They belonged to low middle class families. After completing their school, they both were earmarked to work in a biscuit factory.

Going Places Question Answers Class 12 Question 2.
Why did Jansie discourage Sophie from having dreams?
Answer:
Jansie and Sophie both belonged to low middle class families. They did not have any means to fulfil their ambitions and dreams. Jansie had calmly accepted her fate. But Sophie was a very ambitious girl. She had very unrealistic dreams and fantasies. Jansie knew that her friend had to meet disappointment in the end. Therefore she discouraged Sophie from having dreams.

Going Places Class 12 Questions And Answers Question 3.
What did Sophie think of doing after her school?
Answer:
Sophie was a highly ambitious girl. First she decided to open a boutique, then she thought of becoming a manager to start with. She also thought of becoming an actress.

Going Places Class 12 Extra Questions And Answers Question 4.
Why did Sophie long for her brother’s affection?
Answer:
Sophie liked her brother more than any other person. But he was very introvert. He would not tell any of his secrets. However he was the only person who listened to Sophie’s wild stories. Therefore, Sophie longed for her brother’s affection.

Going Places Question Answer  Question 5.
Why didn’t Sophie want Jansie to know about her meeting with Danny?
Answer:
Sophie thought if Jansie came to know about her meeting with Danny, she would tell everyone. Then thousands of people would come to her house. It would make her father very angry. She thought that her father could then possibly murder her.

Going Places Extra Questions Class 12 Question 6.
Why did Jansie discourage Sophie from entertaining thoughts about the sports-star Danny Casey? .
Answer:
Jansie knew her friend Sophie well. She knew that  Sophie’s meeting with Danny Casey was just her imagination. She wanted Sophie to be practical. She a Juiew such thoughts would create troubles for Sophie. Therefore she discouraged Sophie from entertaining thoughts about the sports-star Danny Casey.

Going Places Question Answer Class 12 Question 7.
It is natural for teenagers to have unrealistic dreams. What would you say are benefits and disadvantages of such fantasising?
Answer:
Teenage is considered the best period in person’s life. In this age, the person has maximum energy and he is free from every responsibility. But it is also the age when the person has dreams and fantasies. Every teenager has some role model also. It would be beneficial for the person if he goes into the direction of his/her dreams diligently. But mere fantasising and dreaming bring nothing but disappointment.

Going Places Important Questions Class 12 Question 8.
‘Damn that Geoff, this was a Geoff thing not a Jansie thing.’ Why did Sophie say so?
Answer:
Sophie told her brother, Geoff about her meeting with Danny Casey. She was sure that that he would not tell anybody her secret. But on the other hand, Geoff told that secret to Jansie’s brother and Jansie asked Sophie about it. Sophie became very angry with her brother and said, ‘Damn that Geoff, this was a Geoff thing not a Jansie thing.’

Going Places Questions And Answers Class 12 Question 9.
How did Sophie’s father react when Geoff told him about her meeting with Danny Casey?
Answer:
Sophie’s father turned his head on his thick neck to look at her. His expression was one of disdain. Sophie told him that Danny Casey was going to buy a shop. At this her father muttered, “This is another of your wild stories. One of these days you’re going to talk yourself into a load of trouble.” This shows that the old man knew his daughter very well.

Going Places Class 12 Questions And Answers Pdf Question 10.
What is the profession of Geoff ? How is he different from his sister?
Answer:
Geoff left his school three years ago. Now he works as an apprentice mechanic. He has to travel to his work to the far end of the city. But he is very introvert. He is not a daydreamer like Sophie. But he loves his sister very much so he listens her wild stories patiently.

Question 11.
Who was Danny Casey? How can you say that the members of Sophie’s family were great fan of his?
Answer:
Danny Casey was a young football player. He played for the United. Sophie and the members of her family were a great fan of his. Sophie even started dreaming to have a date with him. Her family went to see a football match in which Danny was playing.

Question 12.
Where did Sophie meet Danny Casey as she claimed?
Answer:
Sophie met Danny for the first time in the arcade. It was she who spoke first. She wanted an autograph for her little brother Derek. But neither of them had any pen. Therefore, they just talked a bit.

Question 13.
Do you think that Sophie’s meeting with Danny actually happened or it was just a part of her imagination?
Answer:
It appeared possible that Danny might have met with Sophie at the arcade. It also appeared possible they might have talked a bit. But it didn’t appear to be I possible that Danny would have called her to meet i the next week. The last part of her story is highly improbable. It was just a part of her imagination.

Question 14.
What thoughts come to Sophie’s mind as she sit by the canal?
Answer:
Sitting by the side of the canal Sophie waits for Danny Casey to come. The time keeps on passing. She starts feeling pangs of doubt inside her. Then she remembers Geoff saying he would never come. She thinks that she will never be able prove that the others were wrong to doubt her.

Question 15.
Did Geoff keep his promise to Sophie? How do you know?
Answer:
No, Geoff didn’t keep his promise to Sophie. He told Jansie’s brother about Soiphie’s meeting with Danny Casey. Jansie asked Sophie about that. Sophie felt a kind of shock. She had never expected that from Geoff.

Question 16.
What kind of a girl Jansie is?
Answer:
Jansie is a very practical girl. She belongs to a low middle class family. But she is contented with her life. She has accepted the reality calmly that she has to work as a petty employee in a biscuit factory.

Question 17.
Write a few lines about Sophie’s father?
Answer:
Sophie’s father belonged to labour class. He belonged to a low middle class. He had rough eating manners. He was quite a carefree person and didn’t take much interest in the activities of his children.

Question 18.
Where was it most likely that the two girls would find work after school?
Answer:
Both the girls belonged to low middle class. They had been earmarked for a biscuit factory.

Question 19.
Why did Sophie wriggle when Geoff told her father that she had met Danny Casey?
Answer:
Sophie knew that her father would become angry when he came to know about her meeting with Danny Casey. She knew he would scold her badly and severely. Therefore, she wriggled when Geoff told her father that she had met Danny Casey.

Question 20.
Does Geoff believe what Sophie says about her meeting with Danny Casey?
Answer:
Geoff doesn’t believe Sophie when the latter tells him about her meeting with Danny Casey. He knows his sister well and knows she lives in the world of dreams.

Question 21.
Does her father believe her story?
Answer:
Her father doesn’t believe in her story. He knows her daughter well. He turns his head to look at her. He looks at her in disdain.

Question 22.
How does Sophie include her brother Geoff in her fantasy of her future?
Answer:
Sophie has complete confidence in her brother. She knows that he won’t let her down and support her in every situation. Therefore she includes Geoff in her fantasies.

Question 23.
Which country did Danny Casey play for?
Answer:
Danny Casey played for Ireland. However, the English wanted him to play for them.

Question 24.
Why didn’t Sophie want Jansie to know about her story with Danny?
Answer:
Sophie didn’t want Jansie to know her story about Danny Casey. She thought that Jansie would tell everyone about it. Then the people would come in large numbers to know about it in detail. Sophie was very afraid of her father. She feared that her father would become’ furious. He could also murder her.

Question 25.
Did Sophie really meet Danny Casey?
Answer:
It is very difficult to say whether Sophie met with Danny Casey. She might have seen him from distance and then she weaved the whole story about her meeting with him in her mind.

Question 26.
Which was the only occasion when she got to see Danny Casey in person?
Answer:
One Saturday, Sophie went with her family to watch a football match. Danny Casey was playing in this match for the United. He also scored a brilliant goal for his team. That was the only occasion when she saw Danny Casey in person.

Question 27.
How would you describe the character and temperament of Sophie’s father?
Answer:
Sophie’s father belonged to labour class. He belonged to a low middle class. He had rough eating manners. He was quite a carefree person and didn’t take much interest in the activities of his children.

Question 28.
Why did Sophie like her brother Geoff more than any other person? From her perspective, what did he symbolise?
Answer:
Sophie liked her brother because she had full faith in him. She thought that he would never let her secrets out. Therefore, she used to share her secrets with her. Sophie’s brother spoke very little. Sophie thought he was a symbol of some exotic and interesting world.

Going Places Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Sophie lives in a world full of dreams which she does not know she cannot realise. Comment.
Answer:
Sophie belongs to a low middle class family. She has no means to gain name and fame.Therefore, she starts weaving in her mind the unrealistic dreams and fantasies. First of all she thinks that she would open a fine boutique in the city. When her friend Jansie tells her that it would take a lot of money to open a boutique, she says that she would become a manager to begin with. She does not realise that no one would make her a manager straight off.

Then she thinks of becoming an actress. She takes a chance meeting with Danny Casey as a beginning of love-affair with him. She dreams of meeting with him. But this and her other dreams are just a product of her imagination. She does not know how to realise them.

Question 2.
Describe the bond between Geoff and Sophie in spite of differences in their temperament and thinking.
Answer:
Geoff was Sophie’s elder brother. He was an apprentice mechanic and left his school three years ago. Unlike Sophie he was very introvert. Sophie was in fact jealous of his silence. But in spite of all this he loved his sister very much. Sophie would share all her secrets with her. Geoff knew that most of the stories Sophie told him were just a product of her imagination.

But even then he listened to her very patiently. He knew that Sophie’s story of meeting with Danny Casey was not true. But even then he promised her that he would not let her secret out to anybody. However, he warned Sophie that Danny Casey was a famous player. He must have a lot of girlfriends. He knew that Danny Casey would not turn up next week to meet her. He tried to persuade Sophie against her craziness for Danny. In fact Geoff was not only the elder brother of Sophie but also her friend and guide.

Question 3.
How different is Jansie from Sophie?
Or
Jansie is just as old as Sophie but she is very different from her. Bring out the contrast be-tween the two friends, citing relevant instances from the story, “Going Places”.
Answer:
Sophie and Jansie are classmates and friends. But they are poles apart as far as their character and temperament is concerned. Jansie is very down to earth girl. She knows that she belongs to a low middle class. She knows her limitations. She has accepted her fate that she has to work in a biscuit factory as a petty employee after her school education.

On one hand Sophie is an ambitious girl. She too belongs to a low middle class. But she has very unrealistic ambitions and dreams. First of all, she says that she will open a boutique, then she says she will become a manager. She also wants to become an actress. In fact she doesn’t know what she wants to become. She weaves a fantasy around a famous football player. She imagines that he would come and meet her. As a result of her unrealistic dreams and fantasies she has to face disappointment.

Question 4.
Describe the character of Sophie’s father and the role played by him?
Answer:
Sophie’s father belongs to labour class. He goes to his work on his bicycle. He is very careless and care¬free person. He has very rough eating manners. He likes to enjoy himself by going to a pub. He doesn’t care much even about his children. But this doesn’t mean that he knows nothing about the temperament of his children.

When Sophie keeps on saying that she has met Danny Casey, he looks at her disdain and says, “This another of your wild stories? One of these days you are going to talk yourself into a load of trouble.” In the end he proves true when Sophie has to meet disappointment regarding her supposed meeting with Danny Casey.

Question 5.
Write in brief the character-sketch of Geoff.
Answer:
Geoff was Sophie’s elder brother. He was three years out of school. He was an apprentice mechanic and he travelled to his work each day to the far side of the city. He was very introvert and spoke very little. Words had to be prized out of him like stones out of the ground. He was the only one with whom Sophie seemed to be close and she used to share all her secrets with him.

He also loved his sister very much. Sophie was jealous of his silence. She thought perhaps he knew many exotic and interesting people. However Geoff was so introvert that he didn’t make new friends easily. In fact, Geoff was a person who loved solitude.

Question 6.
Attempt a character-sketch of Sophie as a woman who lives in her dreams.
Answer:
Sophie belongs to a low middle class family. She has no means to gain name and fame. Therefore, she starts weaving in her mind the unrealistic dreams and fantasies. First of all, she thinks that she would open a fine boutique in the city. When her friend Jansie tells her that it would take a lot of money to open a boutique, she says that she would become a manager to begin with.

She does not realise that no one would make her a manager straight off. Then she thinks of becoming an actress. She takes a chance meeting with Danny Casey as a beginning of love-affair with them. She dreams of meeting with him. But this and her other dreams are just a product of her imagination. In fact, Sophie is a woman who lives in her dreams. She doesn’t know how to realise her dreams.

Question 7.
Sophie was a dreamer. This lesson, ‘Going Places’ reminds us that mere dreams will not help us to accomplish anything. What qualities, do you think, would help Sophie to realise her dreams?
Answer:
Sophie is shown as a girl who remains in the world of dreams. She always wants to gain name and fame. She wants to open a boutique or she wants to become a manager to begin with. She also wants to be an actress. But Sophie doesn’t have any means to fulfil her dreams.

She belongs to a low middle class family. To realise her dreams she has to work very hard. She has to start from a very humble position and then with constant hard work she can accomplish her dreams. But for that she must have a lot of patience and practical approach. By day-dreaming and unrealistic fantasies she cannot accomplish dreams.

Question 8.
Teachers always advise their students to dream big. Yet, the same teachers in the classroom find fault with Sophie when she dreams. What is wrong with Sophie’s dreams?
Answer:
It is always good to dream big. But the dreams should also be realistic. We can’t achieve great heights suddenly as if someone has turned a magical wand. Sophie belongs to a low middle class family. She has no means to gain name and fame. Therefore, she starts weaving in her mind the unrealistic dreams and fantasies. First of all, she thinks that she would open a fine boutique in the city. When her friend Jansie tells her that it would take a lot of money to open a boutique, she says that she would become a manager to begin with. She does not realise that no one would make her a manager straight off.

Then she thinks of becoming an actress. She takes a chance meeting with Danny Casey as a beginning of love- affair with him. She dreams of meeting with him. But this and her other dreams are just a product of her imagination. She does not know how to realise them. We should dream big but for that we should make constant efforts. Mere dreaming brings disappointment as it happens with Sophie.

Question 9.
Every teenager has a hero/heroine to admire. So many times they become role models for them. What is wrong if Sophie fantasies about Danny Casey and is ambitious in life?
Answer:
It is true that almost every teenager has a hero/heroine to admire. That person may be some film star or sports person. Teenagers try to copy them. For them, they become their role models. There is nothing wrong in this. But sometimes this likeness for their role models becomes obsession with them. Teenagers could think nothing but their role models.

Eventually, they have to face disappointment in the end. Exactly this thing happened with Sophie. She took a chance meeting with Danny Casey as a beginning of love affair with him. She kept on dreaming about him. But this dream was not based on reality. As a result, she had to face disappointment in the end.

Question 10.
What were the options that Sophie was dreaming of? Why does Jansie discourage her from having such dreams?
Answer:
Sophie was a very ambitious girl. She lived in the world of dreams and fantasies. She told Jansie that she would open a boutique after leaving the school. At this, Jansie informed her that it took a lot of money to open a boutique. At this Sophie said she would begin her career as a manager. Jansie informed her no one would appoint her as a manager straight off.

Then Sophie told Jansie that she would become an actress since actress had not to work for the whole day. She said when she had earned enough money then she would open her boutique. Jansie knew that she and Sophie were both ear-marked for a biscuit factory. She wished that Sophie should not say such unrealistic things. Jansie wanted Sophie to be sensible and she wanted to discourage her from such fantasies.

Question 11.
Sophie’s dreams and disappointments are all in her mind. Discuss.
Answer:
Sophie belonged to a low middle class family. She had no means to gain name and fame. Therefore she started weaving in her mind the unrealistic dreams and fantasies. First she thought that she would open a fine boutique in the city. When her friend Jansie told her that it would take a lot of money to open a boutique, she said that she would become a manager to begin with.

She did not realise that no one would make her a manager straight off. Then she thought she would become an actress. She took a chance meeting with Danny Casey as a beginning of love-affair with him. She dreamt of meeting with him. But this and her other dreams were just product of her mind and not based on any reality.

Question 12.
What socio-economic background did Sophie belong to? What are the indicators of her family’s financial status?
Answer:
Sophie belonged to a low middle class family. She was going to leave her school within a few months and was earmarked to work in a biscuit factory as a petty employee. This showed that she was not going to do high studies. She lived in a small house which remained smoky. Her father belonged to labour class and had only a bicycle to go to his work.

He had very rough eating manners. He used to enjoy himself in a pub. Her telder brother had left school about three years ago yet was just an apprentice mechanic. All these were the indicators that showed that Sophie’s family was not a well-to-do family.

Question 13.
Sophie and Jansie were class-mates and Mends. What were the differences between them that show up in the story?
Answer:
Sophie and Jansie were classmates and friends. But they were poles apart as far as their character and temperament is concerned. Jansie was very down to earth girl. She knew that she belonged to a low middle class. She knew her limitations. She had accepted her fate that she had to work in a biscuit factory as a petty employee after her school education.

On the other hand Sophie was an ambitious girl. She too belonged to a low middle class. But she had very unrealistic ambitions and dreams. First she said that she would open a boutique, then she said she would become a manager. She also wanted to become an actress. In fact she didn’t know what she wanted to become. She wove a fantasy around a famous football player. She imagined that he would come and meet her. As a result of her unrealistic dreams and fantasies she had to face disappointment.

Going Places Extra Questions and Answers Extract Based

Read, the following paragraph and answer the questions that follow:

(Para-1)

Sophie watched her back stooped over the sink and wondered at the inconguity of the delicate bow which fastened her apron strings. The delicate-seeming bow and the crooked back. The evening has already blacked in the windows and the small room was steady from the stone and cluttered with the heavy-breathing man in his vest at the table and the dirty washing piled up in the corner. Sophie felt a tightening in her throat. She went to look for her brother Geoff.

Questions :
(a) Whose bow did Sophie watched and what did she feel ?
(b) What was the condition of the small room ?
(c) What did Sophie feel and what did she do then ?
(d) Name the chapter and its writer.
Answers:
(a) Sophie watched the back bow of her own mother stooped over the sink and wondered at the inconguity of the delicate bow.
(b) The small room was steamy from the stove and cluttered with the heavy-breathing man in his vest at the table and the dirty washing piled up in the corner.
(c) Sophie felt a tightening in her throat and she went to look for her brother Geoff.
(d) The chapter’s name is ‘Going Places’ and its writter is ‘A. R. Barton’.

(Para-2)

“It was nothing like that, Geoff It was me spoke first. When I saw who it was, I said, “Excuse me, but aren’t you Danny Casey ?” And he looked sort of surprised. And he said, “Yes, that’s right.” And I knew it must be him because he had the accent, you know, like when they interviewed him on the television. So I asked him for an autograph for little Derek, but neither of us had any paper or a pen. So then we just talked a bit. About the clothes in Royce’s window. He seemed lonely. After all, it’s a long way from the west of Ireland. And then, just as he was going, he said, If I would care to meet him next week he would give me an autograph then. Of course, I said I would.”

Questions :
(a) Who looked sort of surprised and why ?
(b) How did Sophie confirm that he was Danny Casey ?
(c) What did Sophie ask him and what happened then ?
(d) While going, what did Danny Casey ask her ?
Answers :
(a) Danny Casey looked sort of surprised because Sophie asked him about his name (identity).
(b) By hearing his accent and remembering his interview on television, she confirmed that he was Danny Casey.
(c) Sophie asked him for an autograph for little Derek but neither of them had any paper or a pen.
(d) While going, Danny Casey asked her. If she would care to meet him next week he would give her an autograph then.

(Para-3)

After dark she walked by the canal, along a sheltered path lighted only by the glare of the lamps from the wharf across the water, and the unceasing drone of the city was muffled and distant. It was a place she had often played in when she was a child. There was a wooden bench beneath a solitary elm where lovers sometimes came. She sat down to wait. It was the perfect place, she had always thought so, for a meeting of this kind. For those who wished not to be observed. She knew he would approve.

Questions :
(a) After dark, where did she walk along ?
(b) Why that place was suitable for meeting ?
(c) Where and why did she sit ?
(d) Why it was a perfect place ?
Answers :
(a) After dark, she walked by the canal, along a sheltered path lighted only by the glare of the lamps from the wharf across the water.
(b) The unceasing drone of the city was muffled and distant, so that place was suitable for meeting.
(c) There was a wooden bench beneath a solitary elm where . lovers sometimes came, she sat down there to wait.
(d) It was a perfect place because lovers metting there could not be observed by anyone.

(Para-4)

And afterwards you wait there alone in the arcade for a long while, standing where he stood, remembering the soft melodious voice, the shimmer of green eyes. No taller than you. No bolder then you. The prodigy. The innocent genius, the great Danny Casey.
And she saw it all again, last Saturday saw him ghost past the lumbering defenders, heard the fifty thousand catch their breath as he hovored momentarily over the ball, and then the explosion of sound as he struck it crisply into the goal, the sudden thunderous eruption of exultant approbation.

Questions :
(a) What was she remembering about Danny Casey ?
(b) What titles did she use for Danny Casey ?
(c) When and what did she see last Saturday ?
(d) What explosion could be seen at the stadium ?
Answers :
(a) She was remembering about the scene of the arcade where he stood. She remembered the soft melodious voice and the shimmer of green eyes.
(b) She titled Danny Casey “No taller than you’, the prodigy, the innocent genius, the great Danny Casey.
(c) Last Saturday, she saw him ghost past the lumbering defenders, heard the fifty thousand catch their breath as he hovered momentarily over the balk
(d) The explosion of sound, the sudden thunderous eruption of exultant approbation could be seen at the stadium.